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Guide 
To Appeals 
Page 4 




urrenf Sauce 



Vol. LIV— No. 1 




Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



4- 



Cheerleaders — 
Campus Phenomena 
Page 2 

Thursday, June 15, 1967 



Perched atop the ladder of life are Leah Luckett (left) and Marcella 
McGlothen, twin daughters of "Mr. and Mrs. Chap," played by Bill 
Stratten and Myrna Schexnider. All are characters in the musical 
comedy, "Stop the World, I Want to Get Off opening Tuesday in 
the College Theatre. 



July Music Camp To Offer 
Twirling, Conducting Classes 



The annual July music camp 
sponsored by the music depart- 
ment will offer courses ranging 
from twirling to conducting to 
junior high and high school band 
students from all over the state. 

Professional instruction will 
also be provided in all band and 
orchestral instruments, piano, 
music appreciation, and music 
theory during the two week ses- 
sion. 

' Climaxing the camp will be a 
student concert at which camp 
awards will be presented. Pre- 
liminary recitals and concerts 
are also planned in preparation 
for the final program. 

In addition to their musical 
studies, the campers will partici- 
pate in a fully supervised rec- 
reational program which includes 
dances, swimming, stunt night, 
movies and games. 

Serving on the faculty with 

Fowler Announces 
Social Committee 

Bill Fowler, Student Govern- 
ment Association vice president, 
has announced the appointment 
of five students to the Student 
Entertainment Committee for the 
summer term. 

The primary responsibility of 
the committee is to plan dances 
and social events for the summer. 
In the fall, a new committee will 
be in charge of booking big-name 
entertainment for the semester. 

Named to the committee were 
Linda Bacon, president of the 
Purple Jackets; Sarah Grunwald, 
past president of the Associated 
Women Students; Shirley Grun- 
wald, former freshman associate 
on the SGA; Sandra Liberto, 
member of Delta Zeta social 
sorority, and Mike Armstrong, 
member of Kappa Sigma Fratern- 
ity. 

Fowler plans to hold weekly 
meetings with the group during 
the summer semester to organize 
and improve dances and social 
activities. 



band directors from the surround- 
ing area will be Robert Willis, 
associate professor of music, Mrs. 
Glenda Bates, piano teacher and 
Sharon Parker, twirling assistant. 

College Receives 
Scientific Grant 
For Equipment 

Northwestern has received a 
$7,000 matching grant from the 
National Science Foundation for 
the purchase of scientific equip- 
ment annd reference materials, 
according to Presdient Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick. 

The grant, which is the fifth 
consecutive one received by the 
college, will be under the direc- 
tion of Kenneth Williams, assis- 
tant professor of biological 
sciences. 

Plans call for increasing the 
equipment available for general 
biology laboratory instruction, in- 
creasing the scope of presentation 
and facilities for student experi- 
mentation in cell physiology, 
plant physiology improvement of 
facilities for field work, especially 
in limnology, biology of the 
fishes, herpetology and plant 
pathology, and augmentation of 
present instructional equipment 
in genetics and parasitology. 

Pool Hours Given 
For Summer Term 

Swimming recreation hours 
have been set at the Natatorium 
for men, women and families. 

Men will be allowed in the pool 
from 6-8 p.m. on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays and on Saturdays from 
3-5 p.m. 

Women will be permitted to 
swim on Mondays and Wednes- 
days from 6-8 p.m. and also on 
Sundays from 3-5 p.m. 

Family hours are from 6-8 p.m. 
on Fridays only. 



x Srop The World' Readies 
For Audiences Next Week 



By Jim O'Quinn 

The 1967 Summer Theatre Workshop graduates from 
preparation to performance Tuesday evening as the sounds 
and songs of ''Stop the World, I Want to Get Off!", the 1962 
hit musical comedy, comes to the Little Theatre stage. 
A remarkable set 



, unique per 
formances, and a celebrated music 
score combine to make "Stop the 
World" what Director Mark Pet- 
taway calls "the most unusual 
show ever done at Northwestern." 

The musical, scheduled to open 
Tuesday for a three-night ru,n 
will be the first of three summer 
workshop productions. 

Leading the cast are freshmen 
speech major Bill Stratton at 
Littlechap, a modern Everyman; 
and Mrs. Myrna Schexnider in a 
four-character role as Littlechap's 
international loves. 

Stratton has been active in Lake 
Charles Little Theatre and in the 
Artists' Civic Theatre and Studio 
of Lake Charles. He was featured 
as the March Hare in the recent 
ACTS production of Pettaway's 
"Alice!", a musical adaptation of 
Lewis Carroll's stories. 

Mrs. Schexnider, wife of Ray 
Schexnider, debate coach and 
speech instructor, attended USL 
in Lafayette and has been active 
in Baton Rouge Little Theatre. 

Pettaway, former speech in- 
structor at LaGrange High School, 
is a resident of Lake Charles 
and director of ACTS. His direc- 
torial and staging credits include 
Lake Charles productions of 
"Camelot," "The Sound of 
Music," and "Carnival." 

Leah Luckett, speech educa- 
tion major of Natchitoches, and 
Marcella McGlothen, speech ma- 
jor of Opelousas, will play Little- 
chap's look-alike daughters jn 
"Stop the World." 

Supporting chorus members in- 
clude Cathy Ashlock, Dorthy Mar- 
tin, Suzanne Evans, Virginia Gee, 



Shirley Rultedge, Barbara Tauzin, 
and Chris Keeler. 

The play, which ran on Broad- 
way for 593 performances, was 
written, scored and directed by 
Anthony Newley and Leslie Bri- 
cusse. Hit songs from the show in- 
clude "Gonna Build a Mountain," 
"Once in a Lifetime," and "What 
Kind of Fool Am I?" 
"Stop the World" production 



staff includes Susie Chancey, as- 
sistant to the director; Pam Clark, 
producer; Harvey Wilson, sound; 
Phyllis Jackson, props; Brenda 
Chandler and Mary Dell Ouzier, 
costumes; and Nancy Martin, 
Charles Burr, and Pam Clark, 
lights. The show entails a complex 
and ingenious lighting schedule, 
Pettaway noted, with over 70 
light cues. 

Music will be provided by an 
orchestral quintet including Ann 
Meyers and Jim O'Quinn, piano; 
Jimmy Green, bass, Dale Shaw, 
percussion; and G. T. Spence, 
baritone. 



Board Okays Names 
For New Buddings 



The State Board of Education 
in Baton Rouge has approved the 
names for two dormitories, a nwe 
dinning hall and the natatorium, 
according to President Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick. 

Called Northwestern Nata- 
torium since its completion in 
1939, the indoor swimming facil- 
ity has been named in honor of 
the former dean of education who 
died in 1965. 

President Kilpatrick said the 
tradition of naming buildings 
after Louisiana parishes was fol- 
lowed in the naming , of the resi- 
dence halls and the dinning facil- 
ity. 

The new women's dormitory, a 
S2 million structure which houses 
750 students, will become Sabine 
Hall. Rapides Hall was the name 
chosen for the $1.8 million men's 
dormitiry, which accommodates 
650 students. 

Iberville Hall is the name se- 



lected for the new $171,00 dining 
facility. The new residence halls 
and the dinning halls were open- 
ed in the fall of 1966, shortly 
after the beginning of Kilpatrick's 
administration. 

The natatorium was built at 
Northwestern while Dr. Nesom 
was head of the department of 
health, physical education and 
recreation, a position he held 
from 1939 until he was named 
dean of education in 1964. He 
died September 15, 1964. 

SMYL - A - MYTE 

Math isn't easy. Ask Charles 
Little, Math 106 instructor. While 
trying desperately to explain 
right triangles to his class, a stu- 
dent spoke up, "Yes, sir. We 
understand about right triangles. 
But tohat about left triangles?" 




Faces of pain, confusion, tolerance, hysteria and complacency are seen in a view of summer registration 
held early last week. Exact figures and facts on enrollment were unavailable by the Sauce deadline. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, June 15, 1967 



Funny Thing... 



By Alice Anne Conner 



A funny thing happened to me 
bright and early this past Monday 
on my way to the Student Union. 

Actually, it wasn't so funny, be- 
cause it was 7 a.m. and I wasn't 
quite awake to begin with. As I 
opened the door of the Union, my 
ears were bombarded with shouts 
of, "Hit em again, harder — 
harder," and "Rah, rah, yea, yea, 
rah," — things like that. 

At first I thought there must 
be a fight going on, but then, 
who has enough energy to fight 
at 7 in the morning? 

Then it hit me, and I do mean 
hit. No less than ten million brief- 
ly clad, hysterical children (not 
one over 16) swarmed out of the 
Student Union Ballroom. After I 
regained consciousness, I asked 
someone what, in the name of 
Dudley Fulton, was it. "Oh, 
them," my friend answered non- 
chalonantly. "Those are just high 
school cheerleaders." 

Cheerleaders. I let the word 
roll around in my smoky grey 
matter for a few moments. Oh, 
yes. I seem to remember. Some- 
thing about yelling, football 
games, pep rallies. It had been so 
long ago. 

I decided to observe them for a 
few minutes and gain a working 
knowledge of the breed, I mean 
as long as I was cutting English 
and all. 

Following a group of them out 
toward the parking lot, I noticed 
one similarity in all of them. 
They never shut up. If they were 
not yelling, they were screaming. 
If they weren't screaming they 
were talking a mile a minute. It 
was fantastic! 

After they reached the parking 
lot, they formed a line and began 
jumping and running and yelling 
and waving their arms ... all at 
the same time. I finally managed 
ot pull one of them to the side and 
ask her a few brief questions. 

"Would you mind telling me 
what you people are shoutking 
about?" I asked in a low tone. 

"Why, we're practicing our yell 
for the competition today," she 
answered, astonished that I 
should have to ask such a ques- 
tion. 

"You mean to tell me,'' I said 
(with equal astonishment) "That 
you people have contests to judge 
who can yell the loudest?" 

"Oh, we aren't judged only on 
how loud we yell, but on our 
form, our style, things like that." 

With that, she excused herself 
and ran back to the group and 
continued practicing whatever it 
was they were practicing. 

By this time, I was thoroughly 
intrigued. I began asking other 
people questions about these fan- 
tastic creatures. It seems that 
scores of high schools in the area 
send their cheerers to the "NSC 
Cheerleading Clinic" each sum- 
mer for a week during which time 
thev learn to yell. 

O.K. 

According to the college stu- 
dents who live in the same dormi- 
tory with the young ladies, the 
high schools are wasting their 
money. Observed one upperclass- 
man, "They might need lessons 
in some things, but it's certainly 



urre 



nt S 



auce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the faU and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription S3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegia' e 
Press 

Frances Toler Editor 

Alice Anne Conner Associate Editor 

Leah Luckett News Editor 

Mickey Pigg Business Manager 

Repoters; Susie Chancey, Jim O'Quinn, 
and Steve Gunn 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
memuers of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the ctudent body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



not yelling." 

It should also be noted that the 
bright-eyed youngesters have a 
fantastic ability to go forever 
without sleep. They hit the park- 
ing lots, the driveways, and the 
grassy slopes no later than 6 a.m. 
each and every day and can be 
heard walking the dormitory 
floors at 3 and 4 in the morning. 

I naturally assumed they were 
on pills, but it seems they have 
their own special diet. Meals 
usually consist of a Coke, a candy 
bar or bag of potato chips, and 
maybe an ice cream cone for a 
snack, and they are attractive to 
a fault. 

Their complexions are creamy, 
their hair is shiny and none of 
them wear over a size 10 dress. 
It's unbelievable. 

If any of us (female, college 



Davis Heads New 
Economics Dept. 

Dr. James N. Davis Jr., head of 
the Department of Business Ad- 
ministration, has been named 
head of the newly-established 
Department of Economics, effec- 
tive July 1. 

Dr. Davis joined the faculty 
last June, coming from South- 
western College at Winnfield, 
Kansas, where he was professor 
and chairman of the Department 
of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration. 

He has served on business 
faculties at Texas College of Arts 
and Industries at Kingsville, the 
University of Mississippi at Ox- 
ford, Harding College in Searcy, 
Ark., and at the University of 
Arkansas at Fayetteville. 

students) were to try and exist 
on candy, cokes, chips and ice 
cream, we would soon resemble 
one big pimple — and a very tired 
one at that. 
Ah, youth . . . 



Move Up The Right Way 

Valuable people move up with North American. Just ask their 
companies. Our employer-paid moves increase dramatically year 
after year. The word's out that valuable people demand special 
care. Otherwise, why would their companies specify North 
American? Move up with North American. It cost no more. Ask 
about new Budget Plan Moving . . . very practical for Junior 



Executives. 




NATCHITOCHES TRANSFER 
& STORAGE 



NORTH AMERICAN 
VAN LINES 

The GENTLEmen 
of the Moving 
Industry 

Hwy. 1 South 




Phone 
352-8742 
352-5225 



100% Hickory Smoked 

Bar-B-Que 
Hitch 

Beef - Pork - Hot Links 
Sandwich or Plate Lunch 

Custom Cooking 

1 mile past NSC on Robeline Rd. 



Tots Days at 

Guillet 
Photography 

are Tuesday 
and Thursday 




25% discount from our regular prices is our offer to you. 

This includes the beautiful direct color portrait you have 
been promising yourself. 

This offer is for a limited time (probably through the long 
hot summer) and includes children through age 12 years 

An appointment is not necessary but we do recommend mak- 
ing one if possible. Call us at 2381 and discuss your child's 
portrait sitting and we can serve you more efficiently. 

You can see — 

"Children are happier in Guillet portraits" 
We're on Second Street at Amulete 



A native of Hope, Ark., Dr. that appointment of a successor 

Davis earned his doctorate from to Dr. Davis to head the Depart- 

the University of Arkansas. ment of Business Administratioin 

President Kilpatrick indicated will be announced later. 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



Shop 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

Where you can find everything your heart 
desires in our complete line of fine jewelery. 

Remember everything sells at DISCOUNT PRICES. 

When downtown stop in and browse around 
117 St. Denis Phone 352-6390 



• 65% Polyester, 35% Combed ClittMl • 




ilit 



with 



FaraPress* 



You can always mix business with pleasure, 
work with play in these dressy casual slacks 
that are permanently pressed to "Never Need 
Ironing." The weight is right, the tailoring is 
superb and you'll want several pair. 



KORATRON 



Waists 28"-44" $700 

SUGGESTON FOR 
THE "YOUNG FATHER" 



HUGHES DRY GOODS CO. 

Front Street Natchitoches, La. 



Thursday, June 15, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



FOR 



DAD! 



Lotions and Colognes by 

BRUT - ENGLISH LEATHER - PUB 
BRITISH STERLING - NINE FLAGS 

and many others 



Candy by 

HOLLINGSWORTH and PANGBURN 



Billfolds by 

AMITY 



DeBlieux's Pharmacy New Drug Store 



Broadmoor Shopping Center 
Phone 352-4582 



Second and St. Denis 
Phone 352-2386 



276191 




THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, June 15, 1967 




7 speak of Dreams, which are the children of an idle mind. . .' 



'Flunk Outs Do Have Another 
Chance— The Board of Appeals 



Having problems with grades is 
a thorn in the side of most stu- 
dents especially when the grades 
cause the student to flunk out of 
school. 

It is because of the problems 
that students have with their 
grades that a special appeals com- 
mittee has been formed. Each stu- 
dent that appeals has his case 
considered by the committee. 

To begin with the first step the 
student should take in appealing 
is to get an appeals form from 
the registrar's office. In filling out 
the form he must state reasons 
for failing to meet the college 
grade requirements. 

Some factors that are consid- 
ered valid are: a job that consum- 
ed too much time, a death in the 
family, or hospitalization. Each 
case is considered separately ac- 
cording to the students problem, 
as well as his college record. 

The student's appeal is then 
presented to the appeals commit- 
tee which consist of Mr. Otis 
Crew, Mr. Walter Ledet and Dean 
George Stokes. "The committee 
does not act on appeals immedi- 
ately for two reasons," says Crew. 
"The student's record may be so 
bad that the committee could not 
give the student justice by acting 
immediately, or the student's 
grades are bad, but his past re- 



cord is good and he shows that he 
has been trying." 

Even though his grades are bad 
a good record helps the commit- 
tee decide on the students case. 

There is no limit to the number 
of times a student may appeal; 
however, the State School Board 
says that a student may only be 
dismissed a total of four times. 
After that he is not eligible to re- 
turn to this college. 



JERRY MOOMA 
Call 
CE2-0499 
Collect 



GRILLETTE - ALDREDGE 
JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Bui ova & Elgin Watches 
Watchmaking & Engraving 
A Specialty 

582 Front Street 
Phone 352-3166 



Hames, Pettaway Chosen As 
Best Dramatists Of Year 



Marc Pettaway, graduate stu- 
dent from Lake Charles and Suzy 
Hames of Baton Rouge were 
named best actor and actress at 
the annual Davis Player Banquet 
held last month. 

Receiving awards for best sup- 
porting actress were Alice Anne 
Conner of Bossier City; with Jef- 
free Brooks of Jena and Nick 
Pollacia of Leesville tieing for 
Best Supporting Actor. 

Pettaway received his award, 
the Edna, named for Dr. Edna 
West who is director of the Col- 
lege Theatre, for the role of Eilert 
Lovborg in Hedda Gabler. Miss 
Hames received her statue for 
her portrayal of Mama, in "I 

Alice Anne Conner was awarded 



Remember Mama." 
her Edna for the role of Gay Wel- 
lington in "You Can't Take It 
With You." 

Pollacia won his award for por- 
traying Kolenkov in "You Can't 
Take It With You," while Brooks 
captured his Edna for the role of 
the doctor in Cradle Song. 

John Braden of Natchitoches 
received the outstanding crew 
member award for his work in 
"I Remember Mama." 

Barbara Gresham of Natchi- 
toches, Pettaway and Tom Walker 
of De Quincy received their Davis 
Player Letters for their service 
in the organization this past se- 
mester. 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day service on Dry Cleaning 
Laundry Service 

Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday afternoon after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 

Conveniently located near the campus 

Also — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

One hour Service Until 3 
One day Service on Laundry 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 

Super-Fast Service 



COLLEGE STUDENTS 



Interviews now being arranged for student's seeking 
summer employment. Opportunity to join other students 
in a proven successful scholarship program backed by 
an 89 year old firm. To those who qualify our program 
offers: 

1. $96.50 with opportunity for more. 

2. Expert management training. 

3. All expense paid trip to Hawaii. 

4. 1 of 15, $1,000 scholarships. 

5. Recommended background work for post-graduate 
students. 

6. Up to 13 weeks continuous employment guaran- 
teed. 

Man accepted for similar program last summer averaged 
S153.26 per week. These jobs may develop into partime 
or full time jobs after September. For appointment call 
Mr. Bill in Lafayette at 232-0499. 



P & C Drug Company 

Complete lines for men and women: 



MEN'S 

Pub Cande 
Yama That Man 

LADIES' 
Tabu Ambush 
Revlon Coty 
Christian Dior 

Complete Line of Miss Clairol. 



116 Touline Street 



Brut 
and many others 

Faberge 
Chanlilly 
Channel 



Phone 352-2355 



Medic Economy Pharmacy 

Vamos Insect Spray Reg. $1.19 only 66c 
Brite Set Hair Spray Reg. 98c only 51c 

Score Liq. 1 1 oz. was $1.49 now 77c 
Right Guard Reg. $1.49, sale price 77c 

Clearasil Tube $1.19 only 69c 
O. J. Beauty Lotion Reg. $1.00 now 68c 



Fast Free Delivery 



202 Williams Ave. 



Phone 352-8366 



TEACHERS WANTED 

Southwest, Entire West 

And Alaska 
Salaries S5400 Up — Free 

Registration 
SOUTHWEST TEACHERS 

AGENCY 
1303 Central Ave., N. E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON" 



Box Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 



I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
y Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 

Now Showing 
Thru Saturday 




The man with no 
name again .... 
Clint Eastwood 
In 

"FOR A FEW 
DOLLARS MORE" 

Color 

Sun - Mon - Tues 

Master Criminal! 
Super Spy! 
And All True! 
Christopher 
Plummer 
Romy Schneider 
Trevur Howard 
and 
Yul Brynner 
in 

'TRIPPLE CROSS' 
Color 



CHIEF 

D R I VEv I N 



Tonight - Friday 

Dana Andrews 
Jeanne Crain 
"HOT RODS 
TO HELL" 
Color 

Saturday 
Double Feature 

Paul Ford 
"NEVER TOO 
LATE" 

— Plus — 
Dean Martin 
"FOUR FOR 

TEXAS" 
Both in Color 

Sun - Mon - Tues 

Rod Taylor 
Karl Maiden 
in 

"HOTEL" 
Color 

Wednesday 
"Buck Night" 

James Stewart 

"THE RARE 
BREED" 

— Plus — 
Sturat Whitman 

Richard Boone 

"RIO CONCHOS" 
Both in Color 



Stop The World- 
Take A Look 
Page 4 



Current S 



Vol. LIV— No. 2 



Doherty Named 
Assistant Coach 
Page 2 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Thursday, June 22, 1967 




Workshop Groups 
Number Hundreds 



AMONG THE 43 WORKSHOPS being held on campus throughout the summer was the Reading Conference 
for Louisiana teachers which lasted all day Wednesday. Educators and administrators are seen here in- 
specting the massive education display in the Union. 



The summer session, 
known as the "sweat shop" 
by some, seems to have ac- 
quired a new title— the 
"workshop.'! 

With 16 programs already in 
progress, the workshop, Guidance 
for Business and Distributive 
Education, sponsored by Dr. 
Ralph White, assistant professor 
and head of the department of 
business education and office 
administration, will begin today. 

On Monday, June 26, three 
more are to begin. They in- 
clude the Elementary Language 
Arts workshop, sponsored by Dr. 
William Hale, assistant professor 
or education; the Secondary Lan- 
guage Arts workshop, also spon- 
sored by Dr. Hale; and the High 
School Mathematics workshop, 
headed by John Bennett, assistant 
professor of mathematics. 

The 16 programs now in prog- 
ress are Guidance for the Dis- 



College Cadets 
Attend Program 
In Oklah oma 

Thirty-three Northwestern stu- 
dents are attending the Reserve 
Officers Training Corps summer 
camp in Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 

Some 2,000 ROTC cadets from 
50 colleges and universities 
throughout the nation are attend- 
ing the six-week training program 
which ends July 25. 

Cadets attending the summer 
camp are members of the Advanc- 
ed Army ROTC program and are 
located in the Fourth and Fifth 
U.S. Army areas. 

Completion of the camp is a 
requirement toward a commission 
as a second lieutenant in the 
Army or Army Reserve. 

Purpose of the camp is to pro- 
vide practical experience in 
organization, management and 
leadership and develop self-as- 
surance, self-discipline and re- 
spect for authority. 

SMYL - A - MYTE 

Some thoughts cannot be ex- 
pressed with five-dollar icords. 
Ask English 309 teacher, E. B. 
Doering. After breaking a piece 
of chalk while attempting to 
unite on the board, the erudite 
scholar retorted, "My thoughts 
would not improve a Sunday 
School Class." 



'Ask Me No Questions' To Mark 
Second Production Of Theater 



The second production of the 
1967 Summer Theatre Workshop, 
a lively mystery-comedy called 
'Ask Me No Questions," opens 
Tuesday in the Little Theatre at 
8 p.m. 

Leading the cast will be work- 
shop participants Harvey Wilson, 
senior speech major of Vinton, 
freshman Phyllis Jackson of 
Natchitoches, and Alexandria 
speech major Pam Clark. 

In his role as Perry Thornhill, 
well-known mystery novelist, Wil- 
son encounters six conniving fe- 
males, becomes involved in not 
one but five murders, and, in an 
ingenious and surprising denoue- 
ment, solves all the riddles woven 
into the action by playwright Lee 
Edwards. 

Miss Jackson, in her first Col- 
lege Theatre role, is Perry's soul- 
fully Southern fiancee. Miss Clark 
plays Jennifer Baxter, the 
shrewd, psychopathic occupant of 
Perry's Connecticut house-on-the- 
sea. 

The women in Perry's life in- 
clude Mrs. Hildegrade Benson an 
energetic, candid friend of Mrs. 
Baxter, acted by sophomore 
speech major Susie Chancey of 
DeQuincy; Mrs. Constance Par- 
sons, a determined deaf mute 
played by Lake Charles speech 



Outstanding Educators Conduct 
Service Personnel 



Conf 



erence 



The School of Education and 
the Bureau of Research and 
Field Services conducted the first 
annual School Service Person- 
nel Conference yesterday in the 
Student Union Ballroom. 

Group sessions provided op- 
portunities for the state's edu- 
cational administrators to hear 
discussions on business manage- 
ment, transportation, mainten- 
ance, instructional media and 
federal programs. Parish super- 
intendents and members of pro- 
fessional staffs of parish and city 
school boards also participated. 

Dean Tom Paul Southerland of 
the School of Education served 
as chairman and Dr. T. B. Wof- 
ford, head of the Bureau of Re- 
search and Field Services, direct- 
ed arrangements. 

After President Arnold Kilpat- 
rick welcomed the assembly, 
Mack Avants, executive assistant 



superintendent of the State De- 
partment of Education, outlined 
the purpose of the conference. 

Delivering the main address 
of the morning was Lawrence 
Wiley, vice president and ex- 
ecutive editor of Science Research 
Associates, who spoke on "Effec- 
iency and the Supporting Ser- 
vices." 

Serving as consultants for the 
conference were Charles Trotter, 
school planning specialist with 
the U. S. Office of Education; 
Earl Thomas, business superin- 
tendent for Westside Union 
School District in Lancaster, 
Calif.; J. E. Hornet, special ed- 
ucation representative of Inter- 
national Business Machines. 

Also E. N. Dennard, director 
ql Elementary and Secondary 
Education Section Three, Dallas, 
Tex.; and Richard F. Tonigan, pri- 
vate educational plant consultant 
and well-known periodical author. 



major Nancy Martin; Gene Pot- 
ter, lady detective, protrayed by 
Natchitoches French major Bar- 
bara Tauzin; and Mathilda, Perry's 
scheming house-maid, played by 
speech major Anne Weaver. 

Freshman Jim Monk of LeCamp 
completes the cast as jittery 
psychiatrist Dr. John Pilsbury. 

Woodson Selected 
Athletics Writer 
For News Bureau 

Rick Woodson, sports writer 
for the Shreveport Journal for 
the past three years, has been 
appointed News Bureau assistant, 
replacing Jerry Pierce who has 
been named director. 

Woodson, who will be primarily 
responsible for handling sports 
publicity, will assume his duties 
on July 1, according to Dr. Arnold 
Kilpatrick. 

A native of Marshall, Tex., 
Woodson received his BA degree 
from Northwestern in 1964, and 
joined the Shreveport Journal 
staff in June of that year. He is 
a 1959 graduate of Fair Park 
High School in Shreveport. 

He is married to the former 
Connie Wyatt of Natchitoches. 
They have two children. 

Former Graduate 
Receives Wings 
From Airways 

Suzanne M a y n a r d, former 
Northwestern State coed, recently 
graduated from Pan American 
World Ajrways International 
Stewardess College in Miami, 
Florida. 

Presently the former Natchi- 
toches Parish Hospital candy stri- 
per is serving aboard Jet Clipper 
flights from Chicago over the 
polar route to London and Paris. 
Paris. 

Foreign travel is no novelty to 
the new stewardess, who in 1965 
attended the University of Vie- 
nna, Austria, where she studied 
German. She also traveled all 1 
over Western Europe. 

While at Northwestern she 
was a member of Delta Zeta so- 
cial sorority, Chorus, and was a 
finalist in the Lady of the Bra- 
celet. 



Following closely on the heels 
of "Stop the World— I Want to 
Get Off!", the first workshop pro- 
duction of the summer season, 
"Ask Me No Questions" will be 
presented for a three-night mid- 
week run beginning each night at 
8 p.m. Tickets may be reserved by 
students free of charge in the 
speech office of the Fine Arts 
Building (personal student num- 
bers will be required). All non- 
student tickets will be $1.00. 

"Ask Me No Questions" is di- 
rected by Dr. Edna West, with 
technical direction by Frank 
Magers. The production staff con- 
sists of participants in the work- 
shop program. 



advantaged Child, Problems in 
Secretarial Science, Elementary 
Mathematics, Guidance for the 
Disadvantaged Child, Early Child- 
hood Education, Family Develop- 
ment, Summer Theater Work- 
shop, Art Workshop 404, Current 
Research and Developments in 
Textiles and Clothing, Training 
in Maternal and Child Health, 
Teaching and Service Agencies, 
Introduction to the Study of Ex- 
ceptional Children, Economic 
Workshop, Louisiana Natural Re- 
sources, Significant Issues in Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Reading, 
First Annual School Service Per- 
sonnel Conference and the 
General Motors Training Center 
Workshop. 

Set for the month of July are 
Evaluation in Instruction of 
Home Economics, Art Workshop 
414, Joan Last Workshop for 
Piano Teachers, Practical Prob- 
lems in Distributive Education, 
Special Studies in Foods and Nu- 
trition, Elementary Science, 
Health, Safety and First Aid, 
Audio-Visual, Newer Concepts in 
Teaching Food and the Kinder- 
garten Workshop. 

Those listed for August are 
Teacher Aides, Special Problems 
in Elementary or High School 
Mathematics, Special Problems in 
Elementary of High School 
Science, Special Problems in Out- 
door Education and Recreation, 
and Special Problems in Louisi- 
ana's Natural Resources. 

Seven others with dates to be 
announced are Language Arts in 
the Elementary School, Principles 
of Curriculum Development, Im- 
provement of Instruction in High 
School Health and Physical Edu- 
cation, Special Problems in 
Secondary Teaching, Group Pro- 
cedures in Guidance, Psychology 
of learning and the Workshop in 
Elementary School Health and 
Physical Education. 



Fowler Compiles Tentative List 
Of Entertainment Possibilities 



Student Body Vice President 
Bill Fowler has submitted a ten- 
tative list of big-name entertain- 
ment or the all and spring semes- 
ters to members of the entertain- 
ment committee and administra- 
ftive heads. 

The purpose of the list is to 
establish a starting point for the 
selection of entertainment for the 



coming year. Committee mem- 
bers will choose twelve names 
from a list of over 75 possibilities. 

The list was compiled from a 
booking agency publication which 
gives the names of entertainers 
who are available for college per- 
formances. Selection will be made 
on the basis of availability and 
asking prices of the stars. 




NO LAWN SPACE IS SAFE from the jumps and flips of the sneaker- 
shod high school cheerleaders on campus this week for the annual 
three-week Cheerleader Camp. The camp features instructions in 
cheers and gymnastics with awards for proficiency and spirit. 



Fage 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, June 22, 1967 



Tarver Publishes Volumes 
On Slow Learning Students 



Doherty Selected Demon Defensive Line Coach 



Lee Tarver, assistant professor 
of special education, is the author 
of a series of eight publications 
on "Teaching Slow Learners" 
published by Science Research 
Associates of Chicago. 

The publications, for kinder- 
garten to grade 12, have been 
designed to serve as the frame- 
work for a one-year schoolwide 
in-service training program to 
aid teachers, administrations, 
supervisors, counselors and other 
faculty and staff personnel. 

Originally written in 1966-67, 
the series is currently being re- 
written. Thousands of the pub- 
lications have been sold in 49 
states and the District of Colum- 
bia. 

Contest Underway 
To Find Models 

The search for the most photo- 
genic undiscovered girls in 
America is underway in cities 
across the nation. The winner, 
named the "Model of the Year", 
will be selected on CBS Television 
on Wednesday, August 30, in an 
hour-long, color, coast-to-coast 
special. 

This contest, open for married 
or single girls, requires a high 
school diploma and an age limit 
of 23 years before August 31. The 
Model of the Year Pagent is 
operated by Fashion Model of the 
Year, Inc., and affiliate of Stewart 
Models, the firm which will 
represent the top three girls se- 
lected by the judges. Stewart 
Models is one of the foremost 
modeling agencies in the world, 
representing such famous names 
as Twiggy, Veruschka, Marisa 
Berenson and Kecia. 

The "Model of the Year" will 
win a $25,000 guarantee in mod- 
eling fees; the second and third 
place winners will receive 
$15,000 and $10,000 guarantees, 
respectively, each for a full year. 
The winners must be able to 
spend the year following the 
pegeant in New York City pur- 
suing their modeling careers. 

Qualification for the prospec- 
tive contestants includp height 
(5 feet, 6 inches to 5 feet, 10 
inches) and weight (110 to 125 
pounds) limitations which reflect 
model proportions. A girl may 
have had modeling experience, 
but may not have appeared as a 
professional model more than 
once on national television or in 
a national magazine. 

Twenty girls will be brought 
to New York for an all expenses 
paid stay in the fabulous Wal- 
dorf-Astoria Hotel and prelimin- 
ary judging. Faurteen will be 
selected by a panel of judges to 
appear on the telecast. These 
ftourteefn wjill model creations 
by the nation's top designers. 

The television special will be 
sponsored by Metrecal and Cover 
Girl Cosmetics. The contest 
closing date is July 15. but pag- 
eant officials urge qualified girls 
to enter early. 

Requests or efritry forms 
should be directed tt> Fashion 
Model of th(EYear, Inc., P. O. 
Box 3000, Grand Central Station, 
New York, New York, 10017. 

T^turre "t S aiJfte 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State CoUege of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 

Frances Toler Editor 

Alice Anne Conner .... Associate Editor 

Leah Luckett News Editor 

Mickey Pigg Business Manager 

Shelby Lacroix Circulation Mgr. 

Reporters; Susie Chancey, Jim O'Quinn, 
Irene Morgel, and Steve Gunn 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
memuers of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the ctudent body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Tarver pointed out that an 
ever-increasing number of states, 
including Louisiana, are initiat- 
ing slow learner programs and 
the publications provide practical 
ideas for teachers and adminis- 
trators for utilization in planning 
experiences for them. 

Slow learners, he said, are the 
largest segment of mentally 
handicapped children with esti- 
mates reaching as high as 33 per 
cent, mostly in kindergarten to 
ninth grade. The terms dropout 
and slow learner are almost 
synonymous, Tarver explained. 

Tarver earned his undergrad- 
uate degree from Northwestern 
and his master's from Colorado 
State College of Education. He 
has pursued advanced study at 
George Peabody College for 
Teachers and at the University of 
Alabama. 

ToiiceinVFr^^ 
To Replace Davy 
And His Alamo 

"Fr'odo Lives!", [the rallying 
cry of the Tolkein cult, is becom- 
ing almost as well-known to the 
college and high school genera- 
tion as "Remember the Alamo" 
is to grade-schoolers, notes the 
University of Denver Clarioin. 

For the uninitiated, the Clar- 
ion explains, Frodo is a "hobbit", 
one o ""haflings" who live in 
Middle-earth and talk Elish. 
Frodo is the hero of J. R. R. 
Tolkein's The Lord of the Rings, 
a 1,300-page trilogy about Bilbo 
Baggins, who undertakes the 
Lonely Mountain to kill Smaugh, 
a horrible dragon. 

The Lord of the Rings, pub- 
lished in 1956, was the result of 
a temptation, which Tolkein 
couldn't resist, to make a country 
to go with one of the languages 
he had invented. The first fan- 
tasy.The Hobbit, written in 1937 
to asume his children, is a charm- 
ing story of Middle-earth in 
which small, warm, and peace- 
ful creatures played through 
life as one large adventure 

Now 74, Tolkein has managed 
to delight not only his children, 
but also readers all over England 
and America. His zealous fans 
are devoted both to him and to 
his "delicious world of escape." 

The Tolkein Society of Amer- 
ica, which had 800 members at 
last count, analyzes Tolkein and 
his books. Two magazines are 
published regularly "in celebra- 
tion of Tolkein's achievement." 
A recent Life magazine article 
stated, "This is more than mere 
enthusiasm; this is passion — un- 
inhobbited, joyous passion." 

Even the University of Colo- 
rado is partially under the spell. 
Bruce iy Beatief, German and 
(See 'Frodo', page 3) 



Fountain Blue 
Restaurant 



Steaks 

Delicious Shrimp 
and other Seafood 

Noon Lunch - 95c 

FOR THE BEST 
FOOD and SERVICE 

Highway 1 South 
Phone 352-8059 



George Doherty, in charge of 
defense at Louisiana Tech for 
the past 10 years, has been named 
defensive line coach for the De- 
mon football squad, acording to 
head coach Glenn Gossett. 

Doherty began coaching 20 
years ago after a sterling career 
in high school, college and pro- 
fessional football. He left indel- 
ible marks on the football pro- 
grams at Stamps, Ark., and Min- 
den High School, winning six 
district championships in nine 
years at the schools. 

He was an All-State tackle at 
Canton, Miss. High School and 
went to Tech in 1939. Playing 
the 1939 season at Tech, Doherty 
went into the U. S. Army in 1940 
and returned to the Bulldogs in 
1941 to win All-Conference hon- 
ors. 

A 1944 graduate of Louisiana 
Tech, Doherty received his Mas- 
ter's Degree from George Peabody 
College for Teachers in 1957. 

Signed to a professional foot- 
ball contract with the old Brook- 
lyn Dodgers of the National Foot- 
ball League, Doherty was the 
Rookie Lineman of the Year in 
the NFL during his first season. 
He moved to the Buffalo Bills of 
the All-American Conference in 
1946 and played for two seasons. 
He was elected team captafin 
both years. 

Going to Stamps in 1948 after 
four years as a professional foot- 
ball player, he started the school's 
football program. Winless in 10 
games in its first year of com- 
petition, Stamps soared to a 9-2 
record the next season, winning 
the district championship. 

In 1950, Doherty led the Stamps 
team to another district title, 
winning 14 straight before losing 
in the state championship finals. 

Doherty moved to Minden in 
1951, taking over the reins of a 
team that had won only one game 
in three years. After a 4-6 record 



the first season, Minden went 9-2 
in 1952 and won the district 
championship in 1953 with 
another 9-2 mark. 

In 1953, Doherty led the Crim- 
son Tide to a 13-1 record and 
the state championship. Minden 
won the district title again in 
1955 with an 8-2 record and won 
the state title again in 1956, 
finishing 13-1. Doherty's six-year 
record at Minden was 56 victories 
and 14 losses. 

Doherty took over the defense 



at Tech in 1957, and in his decade 
with the Bulldogs, Tech won or 
tied for the Gulf States Confer- 
ence championship five times. 

In announcing Doherty's ap- 
pointment, Gossett said, "It is an 
honor for us to aquire a man of 
George Doherty's calibre for our 
staff. I have known George for 
many years and have always had 
great respect for his abilities. We 
feel that he will make a tremen- 
dous to our program at North- 
western." 



TOTS DAY US 

Tuesday and 
Thursday 
at 

Guillet 
Photography 




25% discount from our regular prices is our offer to you. 

This includes the beautiful direct color portrait you have 
been promising yourself. 

This offer is for a limited time (probably through the long 
hot summer) and includes children through age 12 years 

An appointment is not necessary but we do recommend mak- 
ing one if possible. Call us at 2381 and discuss your child's 
portrait sitting and we can serve you more efficiently. 

You can see — 

"Children are happier in Guillet portraits" 
We're on Second Street at Amulete 



RYDER RESTAURANTS 
Presents 

CHICKEN IS KING 

— Specials to go — 

One whole southern fried chicken 
Two whole southern fried chickens 
Three whole southern fried chickens 
Four whole southern fried chickens 
Five whole southern fried chickens 

sold at 

Broadmoor Restaurant 

10% discount for all college students 
Phone 352-6120 Broadmoor Shopping Center 

Waddle N Grill & Drive In 



with 


french 


bread 


$1.25 


with 


french 


bread 


2.50 


with 


french 


bread 


3.75 


with 


french 


bread 


5.00 


with 


french 


bread 


6.25 



Phone 352-4949 



Highway one South 



Wee Waddle N 



Phone 352-8246 



702 College Avenue 



Thursday, June 22, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page 3 



Luckett Ordained 
Episcopal Priest 

The Rev. Robert Leven Luckett, 
Episcopal chaplain for Northwest- 
ern and vicar of St. Paul's Epis- 
copal Church in Winnfield, was 
ordained to the Sacred Order of 
Priests in Trinity Episcopal 
Church recently. 

The Rt. Rev. Girault Jones, 
bishop of Louisiana, conducted 
the services, and the new priest 
was presented by the Rev. Joel 
Treadwell, Trinity rector. 

Guinn Hodges Jr. and Annette 
Wallace president and vice- 
president of the NSC Canterbury 
Club, also presented Father 
Luckett with a pyx, which is the 
container for the consecrated 
bread used in the communion 
service. 



'Frodo'— 



AND THE BEAT goes on, and on, and on . , , . 



Noble Chosen. Biology Teacher 



Robert E. Noble has been 
named asistant professor of bi- 
ologyv effective in September, 
according to President Arnold 
Kilpatrick. 

Noble received his bachelor 
and master's degrees at Louis- 
iana State University and is cur- 
rently working toward his doc- 
torate at LSU. He has also attend- 
ed the University of Southern 
Mississippi and Michigan State. 

For the past four years, Noble 
has been employed by the Mis- 
sissippi Game and Fish Commis- 
sion as research biologist. He 
has 'also done research for the 
Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries 
Commission. 

Noble holds membership in 
several professional organiza- 
tions, including the Wildlife 
Society, the American Ornithol- 
ogists Union, the American So- 
ciety of Mammalogists, the Mis- 




Army Major Edna Perrin 

Vietnam Hospital 
Headed By Perrin 

Army Major Edna M. Perrin, a 
1958 graduate of Northwestern, 
is presently serving as chief nurse 
of the 44th Medical Brigade's 3rd 
Field Hospital in Tan Son Nhut, 
Vietnam. 

Maj. Perrin is in charge of the 
51 nurses and more than 100 en- 
listed medical personnell who are 
employed in the facility. Although 
most of her work is of an admin- 
istrative nature, Maj. Perrin 
spends much of her time in the 
wards because "that's where a 
nurse's work has its greatest im- 
pact." 

Before arriving in Vietnam in 
September, she was stationed at 
the Medical Training Center, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. 



sissippi Ornithological Society 
and the Inland Bird Banding 
Association. 

Freshman Women 
Awarded $200 
Music Grants 

Four piano scholarships do- 
nated by Mrs. H. D. Dear, private 
piano teacher from Alexandria 
have been awarded to four fresh- 
man women, according to Dr. 
Joseph Carlucci, department head. 

Selection was made by a panel 
of five judges who listened to 
each applicant perform a twenty- 
minute program of baroque, clas- 
sical, romantic and modern music 
for memory. 

Recipients of $200 scholarships 
include Patsy Dupree of Bentley 
and Linda Greene of Natchit- 
oches. Receiving $100 awards 
were Carol Richmond of Shreve- 
port and Janet Ponder of Bossier 
City. 



(Continued from page 2) 

comparative literature professor, 
was to present a Tolkein Talk-In 
in early December. Termed "a 
bright and shining eveniing with 
Frodo and friends," the Talk-In 
was to center on a discussion if 
"On myth, reality, and relevance: 
the success of J. R. R. Tolkein's 
Lord of the Rings." 

South Vietnamese students are 
continuing to protest the exis- 
tense of foreign schools and the 
teaching of the French language 
in South Vietnam, according to 
the Asian Student Bulletin in 
New Delhi. 

The Bulletin Report, contained 
in the Asian Student, a news- 
paper for asian students in the 
United States, said that the Sai- 
gon students have formed a new 
organization — Committee ofr the 
Use of Vietnamese at University 
Levtel and Against Foreigfn 
Schools in Vietnam — to intensify 
their struggle for the closing of 
schools teaching in foreign lang- 
uages, especially French. 

What women refuse to compre- 
hend is that men are not especi- 
ally interested in their problems 
or their future because most 
men are essentially selfish, bad, 
worthless, ruthless, and unde- 
pendable, with certain except 
tions, including you and me, dear 
friend. 



Shop 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

Where you can find everything your heart 
desires in our complete line of fine jewelery. 

Remember everything sells at DISCOUNT PRICES. 

When downtown stop in and browse around 
1 1 7 St. Denis Phone 352-6390 



Former Olympic Gymnast To Replace 
Martinez As Demon Gymnastic Head 



Armando Vega, former Olym 
pic gymnast, has been appointed 
gymnastics coach and instructor 
of physical education, succeeding 
Fred Martinez, who has resigned 
to accept a position with a major 
gymnastics equiptment company. 

A graduate of Penn State Uni- 
versity, Vega was the nation's 
leading gymnast in the late 
1950, s. He competed in the Olym- 
pic Games at Melbourne in 1956 
and in Tokyo in 1964. 

Vega became the first Ameri- 
can in gymnastics to defeat Rus- 
sian competitors in international 
competition. He received an 
award for this feat from the 
Russian Gymnastics Federation. 



Elected to the Helms Hall of 
Fame, Vega was sent by the State 
Department in 1958 and 1961 on 
good will tours to the Middle 
East. 

During his sparkling career at 
Penn State, Vega won 15 first 
place titles in the Intercollegiate 
Championships and 24 first places 
in the NCAA and AAU national 
championships. 

Vega, who assumed his coach- 
ing duties, also has the distinction 
of being one of only two judges 
from the United States chosen to 
attend the first annual Continen- 
tal Course for Gymnastics Judges 
in Mexico last week. 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



save at 




UNITED DOLLAR 


STORE 


Notebook paper 


3 packs $1.00 


Composition Books 


4 for $1.00 


Sudden Beauty Hair Spray 


2 cans $1.00 


Gillette Foamy 


2 cans $1.00 


Located in Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 

Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday afternoon after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 

Conveniently located near the campus 

Also — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

One hour Service Until 3 
One day Service on Laundry 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 

Super-Fast Service 



P&CDrug Company 

Complete lines for men and women: 

MEN'S 



Pub 
Yama 



Cande 
That Man 



LADIES' 
Tabu Ambush 
Rev I on Coty 
Christian Dior 

Complete Line of Miss Clairol. 
1 16 Touline Street 

Fast Free Delivery 



Brut 
and many others 

Faberge 
Chanlilly 
Channel 



Phone 352-2355 



Medic Economy Pharmacy 

Vamos Insect Spray Reg. $1.19 only 66c 
Brite Set Hair Spray Reg. 98c only 51c 

Score Liq. 11 oz. was $1.49 now 77c 
Right Guard Reg. $1.49, sale price 77c 

Clearasil Tube $1.19 only 69c 
O. J. Beauty Lotion Reg. $1.00 now 68c 



202 Williams Ave. 



Phone 352-8366 



J 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, June 22, 1967 



Stop The World 




A Look 



By Alice Anne Conner 

If you never do another con- 
structive thing in your life, it is 
imperative that you march right 
over to the college theatre and 
purchase (in case of non stu- 
dents) or reserve your tickets 
for tonight's production of "Stop 
the World— I want to Get Off." 

The show, directed by graduate 
student Marc Pettaway, is a Sum- 
mer Theatre Workshop produc- 
tion and will have its final per- 
formance tonight at 8. 

Pettaway, with a light, yet firm 
touch, has managed to bring more 
beauty, meaning and laughter to 
the Northwestern State College 
Little Theatre Stage than will 
possibly ever occur again. It's a 
"Once in a Lifetime" experience. 

The Musical comedy, written 
by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony 
Newley, tells the story of a "Lit- 
tlechap," portrayed to loving 
perfection by freshman Bill 
Stratton from Lake Charles, and 
his climb up the ladder of life. 
Littlechap is everyman. He seeks 
to find happiness, first in money, 
second in power, and thirdly in 
fame, searching all the while for 
what he has had all along. 

Stratton's performance must 
have equalled or even surpassed 
Newley's portrayal in the Broad- 
way production. This young man 
(only 17 years old) has more 
than acting ability — he has a 
heart full of love for the theatre 
and his audience. 

His wife Evie, played by Myrna 
Schexnider, is the happiness Lit- 
tle chap is seeking. He seeks her 
in the Russian girl, Ayna, the 
German fraulein, Use, and the 
"typical American girl," Ginnie 
St. Romain. 

Mrs. Schexnider, wife of the 
college debate coach, brings more 
warmth and vibrancy to the stage 
in a single syllable than most 
people can muster in an entire 
oration. She possesses a child- 
like quality which combines sub- 
tly with her obvious womanly 
characteristics. Playing the parts 
of Littlechap's lovers, besides 
his wife, she is completely dif- 
ferent in each character, but 
strangely the same. Underneath 
it all, she is the woman Little 
chap loves — with his own special 
kind of love. 

Marcella McGlothin as Susan 
and Leah Luckett as Jane, the 
Littlechap's daughters, are cast 
to perfection. Miss McGlothin 
has her best moment when she 
appears on the stage as a new- 
born infant. Miss Luckett, whom 
Littlechap wanted to be a boy, 
underplays her role as the mis- 
treated child with the ability of 



a professional. And although the 
young ladies are on the stage for 
short intervals, and for a short 
number of times, their character- 
izations never fall short of per- 
fect. 

The chorus, seven girls who 
are on stage from start to finish, 
had the roughest job of all. Their 
movements in pantomime, com- 
bined with their melodic voices, 
bring the necessary continuity 
to the show. The girls, Virginia 
Gee, Dorothy Martin, Chris Kee- 
ler, Shirley Rutledge, Cathy Ash- 
lock, Suzanne Evans and Barbara 
Tauzin, at times, seem to be in 
the same person. At other times, 
this blossomed into their own 
distinctive personalities. 



Although he's in front of the 
audience for only a few seconds, 
little Ken Graham aptly portrays 
the "Little Lad." 

The set was a vision of simpli- 
city and completely workable for 
the characters. Pettaway's deft 
technical hand is as artistic as 
the directing hand. The costumes, 
also designed by Pettaway, car- 
ried out his theme of simplicity. 

The intricate lighting techni- 
ques demanded by the show were 
handled with narry a hitch by 
Nancy Martin and Pam Clark. 

The music in the show, co- 
ordinated by Jim O'Quinn, and 
assisted by Ann Meyers, Dale 
Shaw, G. T. Spence and Jimmy- 
Green, was too beautiful for sim- 



ple words. Littlechap's and Evie's 
duets, including 'Meilinki Meil- 
chick.' "Someone Nice Like You," 
and "Lumbered," were superb. 

And Littlechap's "What Kind 
of Fool Am I" brought the audi- 
ence to their feet with spontan- 
eous applause. No one ever de- 
served it more. 



Move Up The Right Way 

Valuable people move up with North American. Just ask their 
companies. Our employer-paid moves increase dramatically year 
after year. The word's out that valuable people demand special 
care. Otherwise, why would their companies specify North 
American? Move up with North American. It cost no more. Ask 
about new Budget Plan Moving . . . very practical for Junior 
Executives. 

NATCHITOCHES TRANSFER 
& STORAGE 

NORTH AMERICAN 
VAN LINES 
The GENTLEmen 
of the Moving 
Industry 

Hwy. 1 South 





Phone 
352-8742 
352-5225 



NOW OPEN 

JOHN'S READ MORE 

(News Stand Service) 

Monday through Saturday 
8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 

Sunday 
12:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. 

Magazines — Books — Study guides 
For Adults and Children 

Ask us — If we don't have it 
— We will order it 



105 Church St. 



Nakatosh Hotel Building 



CANE THEATRE 

710 Second St. 
Natchitoches, La. 
Phone 352-2922 



Friday & Saturday 




"Von Ryan's 
Express" 



Sunday - Tuesday 



PARAMOUNT PICTURES presents 




RODW 
ERNEST HOME 
JOHN HIUS 



A R0DL0R Production • A PARAMOUNT Picture 



Starts Wednesday 




Absolutely FLU 8 B E R G AST I N_G ! 
WALT DISNEY'S 

^Absent- ® 

WAUDISNEYS 

im 




Lotions and Colognes by 

BRUT - ENGLISH LEATHER - PUB 
BRITISH STERLING - NINE FLAGS 

and many others 
Candy by 

HOLLI NGS WORTH and PANGBURN 

Billfolds by 

AMITY 

DeBlieux's Pharmacy New Drug Store 



Broadmoor Shopping Center Phone 352-4582 



Second and St. Denis 



Phone 352-2386 



TEACHERS WANTED 

Southwest, Entire West 

And Alaska 
Salaries $5400 Up — Free 

Registration 
SOUTHWEST TEACHERS 

AGENCY 
1303 Central Ave., N. E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



1 



c Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

— Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 

Now Showing 
Thru Saturday 



One Bullet Can 
Kill A Town--- 
Just Like A Town - 
Henry Fonda 

"WELCOME TO 
HARD TIMES" 

Color 

Sun - Mon - Tues 

Wild Is The Word 
For ----- 

"WILD WILD 
PLANET" 

Color 

Starts Wednesday 

Sonny and Cher 

"GOOD TIMES" 

Color 

Starts July 2 ! 

"THE BLUE MAX" 
Color 



CHIEF, 

D RIVE/l N v , 
II 



Tonight and Fridayj 

Elke Sommer 

"DEADLIER 
THAN THE 
MALE" 
Color 

Saturday's • 
Double Feature 

Don Murray 
Janet Leigh 
"KID RODELO" 
Color 
— Plus— 
Debra Paget 

"CLEOPATRA'S 
DAUGHTER" 
Color 

Sun - Mon - Tues 



1 



You Are Going Tol 
Enjoy Alfie Very ffl 

Much 

Michael Caine 
As 
"ALFIE" 
Color 

Wednesday 
"Buck Night 

"COME ON, LET'S | 
LIVE A LITTLE" 

— Plus— 
'SHENANDOAH' 
Both in Color 





urrent S 



auce 



Vol. LIV— No. 3 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 




Thursday, June 29, 1967 



2,000 To Receive 
One Million In Aid 





PRESIDENT ARNOLD KILPATRICK performs his weekly task of presenting trophies to outstanding high 
school cheerleaders. Over 1,000 students have participated in the Annual Northwestern Cheerleader Clinic 
sponsored by the Dallas, Texas branch of the National branch of the Nantionl Cheerleader Association. 



Kilpatrick Announces Purchase 
Of Theatre Seats For Stadium 



Demon sports fans might leave 
a ball game with sore throats, 
but never again will they leave 
with sore- backs. 

President Arnold R. Kilpatrick 
has announced that more than 
6,500 multi-colored, plastic, the- 
atre-type seats have been ordered 
for Demon Stadium and Prather 
Coliseum. 

Designed similar to those in 



the spacious Houston Astrodome, 
the new seats will be complete 
with back and arms to provide 
maximum comfort for the spec- 
tator. 

The new seats will be installed 
this summer and will be ready 
for use before the football season. 

With the exception of the two 
end sections, Demon Stadium will 
be equipped throughout with the 



seats which will vary in color 
according to their section. This 
includes the school colors of pur- 
ple and white. 

Prather Coliseum will be com- 
pletely covered with the new 
seats. On the student side, there 
will be alternating sections of 
purple and white, while, on the 
reserved side, multi-colored seats 
will be installed. 



More than 2,000 Northwestern 
State College studnets will re- 
ceive financial aid varying from 
$50 to $1,500 per year in assis- 
tance from various Federal and 
State programs next year, accord- 
ing to President Arnold R. Kil- 
patrick. 

Combined Federal nad State 
programs will make available a 
total in excess of a million dollars 
in financial aid for students. 

This does not include National 
Science Foundation grants, Spe- 
cial Education grants, graduate 
assistantships and other assistance 
not administered by the Student 
Financial Aid office of the col- 
lege, according to James R. 
Quinn, supervisor of loans and 
grants. 

Of immediate interest to stu- 
dents, Quinn said, was the co-op- 
eration of his office with the Of- 
fice of Economic Opportunity and 
the State Employment Service 
in providing full-time summer 
positions, worth $500 to 30 excep- 
tionally needy students. This pro- 
gram, primarily benefiting young 
women living in non-industrial- 
ized rural areas where jobs are 
almost non-available, is funded 
from the College Work-Study 
Program allocations. 

This is a pilot program, Quinn 
explained, co-ordinated with 
Champ Baker and Sidney McCrory 
of the OEO office. Participating 
Louisiana colleges hope for a 
broadly expanded program next 
summer, Quinn said. 

The Student Financial Aid Of- 
fice recently received approval 
for Federal Student Financial 
Aid programs for the period July 
1, 1S67 to June 31, 1968, in the 
amount of approximately 



$635,000. With the addition of re- 
quired state matching funds, the 
program will total close to three- 
quarters of a million dollars. 

The programs include — The 
National Defense Student Loan 
Program, available to a full-time 
student who needs assistance and 
who demonstrates the ability to 
do satisfactory academic work. 

Educational Opportunity Grants 
are available to undergraduate 
students with great financial 
need, and who demonstrate ability 
to do college work. This program 
is primarily designed to encour- 
age the incoming high school 
graduates who would be unable 
financially to attend college with- 
out it. 

Usually, the eligible student 
receives a loan and student em- 
ployment, along with a grant to 
meet all or nearly all school and 
personal expenses. 

The College Work-Study Pro- 
gram is available to any student 
who needs assistance to meet the 
cost of attending college. Approx- 
imately 1200 students will earn 
$37.50 to $75.00 monthly through 
this program and the auxiliary 
state funded program. Jobs range 
from typists and paper graders 
to printers, food servers, and 
farm hands. 

The Nursing Student Loan 
Program is available to academi- 
cally qualified nursing students 
who need assistance to meet col- 
lege costs. 

The newly-created Nursing Ed- 
ucational Opportunity Grant Pro- 
gram is identical to the broader 
Educational Opportunity Grants 
Program but is limited to nursing 
students only. 



The Precious Gift Of Speech -Yours For The Asking 



By Alice Anne Conner 

A tall, well-built, decidely mas- 
culine young man entered the 
classroom. He took his seat, open- 
ed his book and stared at the 
page — never once looking up. 

During the class period, the 
professor called upon him to 
answer a question. His face glist- 
ening with perspiration, the boy 
opened his mouth, hesitated, and 
finally spoke. 

Several students began to 
snicker, others muffled titters, 
and someone laughed out loud — 
not at what the boy had said, but 
at the way he said it. He sounded 
like a little girl. 

After the period was over, the 
teacher motioned for the boy to 
come to her desk. When the room 
cleared, she asked him if he had 
ever heard of speech therapy. In 
the same high-pitched voice, the 
young man mumbled, "Yes, some- 
one mentioned it to me before, 
but I didn't think it could help 
me." 

"Oh, yes," replied the teacher, 
"you can be helped if you let 
yourself be." With that, the teach- 
er began telling him about the 
services of the speech and hearing 
therapy clinic on campus, and 
how he could benefit from the 
services offered. 

The boy went to the clinic 
where his case was analyzed. 
After a semester of concentrated 
therapy, he was taught to lower 
the pitch of his voice to a normal 
level. Today, several years later, 
the same young man is a teacher 
in the Louisiana school system 
where he is considered "the best 
teacher in the world" by his pu- 
pils. 

This story would be unusual if 
it were not for the fact that the 
speech and hearing therapy clinic 



at Northwestern has been highly 
successful in helping over 800 
such persons, some very old, 
others quite young, with a great 
variety of speech problems in its 
21-year History, and continues 
doing so today. Perhaps the most 
unusual aspect of the work done 
there is the fact that all services 
are rendered free of charge. 

Under the direction of Mrs. 
Irma Taylor, the college speech 
therapy program has over the 
years graduated more than 64 
qualified speech therapists who 
have gone on to practice all over 
the country. Mrs. Taylor took 
over the duties as director of the 
clinic just one year after it was 
initiated at the college and has 
been there since. "My therapists 
take with them the gift of com- 
munication," said the intensely 
blue-eyed instructor. "Through 
their training they are able to 
help people achieve more pro- 
ductive and happier lives." 

Many of the people who attend 
the clinic for help in speech cor- 
rection have led anything but 
happy lives. Typical of the stor- 
ies concerning their childhood is 
one related by a former speech 
defective person: "When I was 
little, some men used to get me 
inside a circle and everytime I 
tried to break out and go home 
they pushed me back. 'Make a 
speech! Make a speech!' they 
jeered. I tried to tell them I had 
to get the groceries home so my 
mother could cook supper, but 
the men just laughed all the 
harder and pushed me back. . . 
They told me to say different 
things, like 'She sells seashells' 
and dirty words. I was crying, 
and I got mad and swore at them 
and they let me go — but I can 



still hear them!' 

"Only someone who has had a 
speech impediment or who has 
had a loved one afflicted with 
such a problem can know the 
heartache and agony these people 
go through," commented Mrs. 
Taylor. 

Besides being ridiculed and 
made fun of, the child with the 
speech defect is often ignored or 
neglected by his teachers in 
school. "If the teacher cannot 
understand the child," one of the 
therapists said, "she will not take 
up the time to teach him the 
things he is missing." Another 
side to the same story is the fact 
that many teachers are embar- 
rassed for the speech defective 
student and will not call upon 
him in class, thus skipping over 
a vital portion of the child's 
education. 

Typical of the neglected child 
was a college freshman who en- 
tered the therapy clinic for treat- 
ment. She was blessed with above- 
average intelligence, an attrac- 
tive appearance and a pleasing 
personality, but she could not 
pronounce many of the sounds 
mastered by the average four- 
year-old. One day, early in her 
speech training, she was attempt- 
ing to read a short selection, but 
she continued to stumble over 
the simplest words — not because 
these words incorporated sounds 
difficult for her to produce, but 
because she did not recognize 
the words. Her therapist looked 
at her in amazement and ex- 
claimed, "Why, you can't read"! 
Blushing, the girl replied, "I 
know I can't I never learned to. 
Down in the grades my teachers 
never could understand anything 



I said, so they never called on 
me to read." 

More teachers today, however, 
are aware of the services offered 
by speech and hearing clinics 
such as those at Northwestern. 
"It should be stressed," the di- 
rector emphasized, "that almost 
any person with any sort of 
speech defect can be helped by 
the properly trained therappist. 
All they have to do is seek that 
help." 

The manner by which the 
speech defects are corrected is an 



extensive and time-consuming op- 
eration. Each of the therapists 
at the NSC clinic has devised his 
own methods of therapy tech- 
niques. Usually, however, the cli- 
ent's voice is taped so that the 
instructor may make a diagnosis 
of his problem. 

For example, take the case of 
Mary, aged 10. Mary, in her first 
taped recording, read a story. In 
the story were all the sounds 
that she should have mastered by 
the age of 10. After listening to 

(See Precious Gift, page 2) 




A young boy receives the gift of speech. . 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, June 29, 1967 



The Precious Gift Of Speech.... little man on campus 



(Continued from page 1) 
the tape carefully, the therapist 
was able to tell with which 
sounds Mary was having diffi- 
culties. Beginning with the eas- 
iest sounds, the therapist took 
Mary through a series of steps 
which would enable her to mas- 
ter the sounds. 

Mary couldn't say the "p" 
sound, so the therapist showed 
her a picture of a pie, and they 
began working on hearing the 
sound of the "p" in pie. "First, 
we work on hearing the sound 
distinctions," explained the thera- 
pist, "for a person can't use a 
sound properly if he can't hear 
how it differs from other sounds." 
From single sounds, the drills go 
on to "nonsence words" enabling 
the child to use the sound without 
a preconceived notion as to how 
it sounds and then on to real 
words and sentences. 

"Of course," stated the thera- 
pist, "this ii an over-simplification 
of the process we take the child 
through, and not everyone works 
in this method. It is, however, a 
fairly good example of how we 
work." 

Most of the persons taking ad- 
vantage of the speech therapy 
program at the college are child- 
ren. They come from local and 
area elementary schools. "Usual- 
ly," said Sidney Storye, therapy 
major from Monterey, La., "peo- 
ple think only children are in 
need of special speech correction. 
Yet we find many older persons 
with speech defects. It's much 
harder, however, to get the adult 
into the clinic because they feel 
ill at ease, sometimes even fool- 
ish, at being here." 

When the older person does 
realize his need for treatment he 
usually progresses rapidly. There 
is no need, as in the case of child- 
ren, to make everything seem like 
play. Whereas the child, once he 
is in the clinic, must be encour- 
aged to learn, the adult, after 
making up his mind to get help, 
is ready to carry his load in the 
learning process. 

The majority of the speech 
cases handled in the NSC clinic 
are articulatory in nature. That 
is, the client makes substitutions, 
(breaktast for breakfast), omis- 
sions, (birday for birthday), and 
additions and distoritons, (dese 
for these and wat for rat), in his 
speech sounds. While other forms 
of speech defections such as 
those of the cerebral palsied, the 
stutterer and those with cleft 
palates are more often quickly 
noticed and treated, the persons 



with articulatory problems many 
times are neglected. In fact, 72 
per cent of all speech problems 
are articulatory disorders. 

The sources of these particular 
speech defects are many and var- 
ied, but most of the therapists 
say that many of the more seri- 
ous cases stem form or at least 
are worsened by emotional dis- 
turbances resulting form con- 
flicts in the home. Janice Fon- 
tenot, speech therapy major from 
Opelousas, tells of one such case: 

"A child was assigned to me 
in my therapy work who seemed 
almost impossible to help. At 
first, he refused to co-operate at 
all. He shouted, jumped up and 
down, hid under the table and 
was generally uncontrollable. He 
seemed almost afraid of me, but 
didn't want to let me know of his 
fear. After talks with his parents, 
teachers and friends, I learned 
that he felt his mother didn't 
love him. Obviously, since his 
mother cared nothing for him, he 
thought, no one else could pos- 
sibly have any interest in him. 

"I had to go to great lengths 
to assure him I cared for him and 
convinced him that he could 
trust me. We played games to- 
gether. Our 'best' game, or the 
one he liked most, was 'soldier.' 
One day I took him on the stage 
and we played we were soldiers 
in the army. Since that time, 
everything we did was done as a 
soldier would do it. We sat up 
straight and tall; we were court- 
eous at all times. This seemed to 
take his mind off his family prob- 
lems and I was able to help him 
overcome his speech problem 
through this approach." 

One of the greatest assistants 
to the therapist is the co-opera- 
tion of the client's parents. Often- 
times, the parents make the 
child's speech problem worse by 
trying, in their own way, to make 
it better. Many parents try to 
bribe their child into speaking 
correctly while others threaten 
him with physical violence. In 
both cases, the child is apt to be- 
come frustrated or frightened or 
both, making the therapists' work 
that much harder. 

"We know parents desire the 
best for their children," com- 
mented Mrs. Taylor, "but some- 
times they become a little con- 
fused as to what is best." To 
prove her point, she told the 
story related by a prominent 
pathologist reporting on his clini- 
oal experiences with a young lis- 
per. It seems Ethel had been 



TOTS DAY 

Tuesday and\ 
Thursday 
at 

Guillet 
Photography jj 

25% discount from our regular prices is our offer to you. 

This includes the beautiful direct color portrait you have 
been promising yourself. 

This offer is for a limited time (probably through the long 
hot summer) and includes children through age 12 years 

An appointment is not necessary but we do recommend mak- 
ing one if possible. Call us at 2381 and discuss your child's 
portrait sitting and we can serve you more efficiently. 

You can see — 

"Children are happier in Guillet portraits" 

We're on Second Street at Amulete 




referred to the speech clinic by 
her classroom teacher. The next 
morning, bright and early, the 
child's mother arrived at the 
clinic quite indisnant that little 
Ethel should be given corrective 
speech. She said, "I lithped and 
I got a huthband, and I want 
Ethel to lithp tho that the'U get 
a huthband too." 

Usually, it is the speech de- 
fective children's teachers, prin- 
cipals or doctors who refer them 
to the speech clinic for treatment, 
but many applicants come from 
the vocational rehabilitation of- 
fice in the parish. Mr. Lamar C. 
Huson, vocational rehibilitational 
supervising counselor for DeSoto 
and Natchitoches parishes, has 
been instrumental in helping 
many of his cases by referring 
them to the speech clinic at 
Northwestern. 

As Mrs. Taylor summed it up, 
"Ordinary people take their 
speech for granted. They tend to 
forget that there are over 3 mil- 
lion persons in the country today 
who, through no fault of their 
own, are denied this same free- 
dom of speech. We are here to 
help these people lead a more 
productive lives through more 
■effective communication — some- 
thing they must have to main- 
tain a place in society." 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3. 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegisre 
Press 

Frances Toler Editor 

Alice Anne Conner . .. Associate Editor 

Leah Luckett News Editor 

Mickey Pigg Business Manager 

Shelby Lacroix Circulation Mgr 

Reporters; Susie Chancey, Jim O'Quinn, 
Irene Morgel, and Steve Gunn 




''I'M ALL fOZ (3M5lNe5TH£ ACAPEMlC S1ANPA0?$, BUT I'VB 
6I6MS A FEW SWVSNTe AW BE ArJOJT To C(2ACK." 



SUMMER FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Monday, July 31 



7:00-9:30 

10:00-12:30 
1:30-4:00 



9:00 o'clock classes 
10:00 o'clock classes 
.... 3:00 o'clock classes 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
memuers of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
coUege. 



Tuesday, August 1 

7:00-9:30 11:00 o'clock classes 

10:00-12:30 7:00 o'clock classes 

1:304:00 1 _ _ 1:00 o'clock classes 

Wednesday, August 2 

7:00-9:30 _ _ _ 12:00 o'clock classes 

10:00-12:30 8:00 o'clock classes 

1:30-4:00 2:00 o'clock classes 



REVIVAL 

June 25-30, 1967 






JERRY O'NEAL 
Music Director 



DONALD C. BROWN 
Evangelist 



• Morning services at 7:00 a.m. 

• Evening services at 7:30 p.m. 

# No Saturday services 

* Nursery provided 

First Baptist Church. 



NATCHITOCHES, LOUISIANA 



Thursday, June 29, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Funny Thing... 



By Alice Anne Conner 

A funny thing happened to me 
while glancing over one of my 
tests the other day. Not that the 
test was anything to laugh at. 
Hardly— unless they were tears 
of sorrows. 

But it suddenly occurred to me 
that it was strange the way all 
tests are categorically alike. By 
that, I mean, most of them are 
divided into four distinct cate- 
gories. 

First of all, we have what pro- 
fessors call "essay" exams. I call 
them "political" tests, because 
you're required to spout off 
sheets and sheets of trivia and 
still manage to come up with a 
few important facts. Politicians 
do the same thing, only they go 
easy on the facts. 

An example of this is a ques- 

Nichols Directs 
Summer Workshop 

A summer workshop in Con- 
servation and Resource-Use Edu- 
cation is presently being directed 
by Robert H. Nichols, assistant 
professor of geography. Also co- 
operating in the project are the 
State Department of Education, 
the Louisiana Forrestry Commis- 
sion, the Soil Conservation Ser- 
vice, mineral industries, and the 
Wildlife and Fisheries Commis- 
sion. 

Objectives of the workshop 
have been to emphasize the im- 
portance of Louisiana's natural 
resources to an economy of local 
communities, the state and the 
nation; to present the latest in- 
formation available on conserva- 
tion and to provide participation 
in interesting activities, projects 
and field trips. 

Instructors for the workshop 
have been furnished by various 
conservation industries and gov- 
ernmental agencies. 

Three hours of graduate credit 
in a course designated as Geog- 
raphy 521 will be available to 
participants. 

Reed To Assist 
In School Plant 
Planning Bureau 

Hoyt J. Reed has been appoint- 
ed associate director of the School 
Plant Planning Laboratory at 
Northwestern State College. 

A native of Pleasant Hill, Reed 
is currently serving as director 
of field surveys for the State De- 
partment of Education in Baton 
Rouge. 

Reed, who will also be an as- 
sistant professor of secondary ed- 
ucation at Northwestern, received 
his bachelor's degree from North- 
western in 1950. He received his 
master's degree from Stephen F. 
Austin in 1953 and has done work 
toward his doctorate at the Uni- 
versity of Arkansas and Louis- 
iana State University. 

Principal at Marthaville High 
School from 1955 until 1965, 
Reed coached at Pleasant Hill 
from 1948 until 1955. 

He is a member of the Louis- 
iana Teachers Assn., Louisiana 
Principals Assn., and the Nation- 
al Council and Schoolhouse Con- 
struction and Interstate School 
Building Service. 



TEACHERS WANTED 

Southwest, Entire West 

And Alaska 
Salaries $5400 Up— Free 

Registration 
SOUTHWEST TEACHERS 

AGENCY 
1303 Central Ave., N. E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



College Obtains Joint Grant 
For School System Survey 

Northwestern State College erams staff r> rc™„ D i t; ..' 



tion like, "Tell me what you 
know about William Words- 
worth." Now — we know he was a 
poet, that he was fond of nature, 
and that he loved the simple 
things of life. Then what are you 
going to say? I suppose you could 
elaborate on his love affair, but 
that could get sticky. 

Another of the test types is the 
"religious", or, as teachers refer 
to them, "objective" tests. We all 
know that there is certainly no- 
thing objective about them, and 
that, in order to come up with 
the right answers, you're going 
to have to pray a lot. That's 
where the religion comes in. A 
sample of this is the true and 
false question, "Hamlet was really 
insane." You pray that you can 
guess what the teacher wants you 
to say, and forget your own stu- 
pid opinions. 

Third in the categories is the 
"revenge" or "fill-in-the-blank" 
ditties. You say, why revenge? 
Well now, for example, take this 
filler-inner: "The South Ameri- 
cans are people." 

If the teacher has it in for you 
for something you've done (or 
something you've written about 
him) he's got you. No matter 
what you say, you're sunk. I, per- 
sonally, would say "fun-loving" 
but try putting that on the test. 
I did. They aren't. 

The fourth and final category 
is the "sock-it-to-them" (a com- 
bination of the three above) tests. 
The instructor is afraid you 
might have studied for one par- 
ticular type of test and he's tak- 
ing no chances. So he gives ques- 
tions like "True or False — the 

. are an extinct tribe. 

Discuss wahy." 

You can't win. . . 

Euthenics Group 
Attends Conclave 

Three faculty members and 
three student are representing 
Northwestern this week at the 
National Convention of the Amer- 
ican Home Economics Asosciation 
in Dallas. 

Faculty members attending the 
convention, which will continue 
through tomorrow, are Mrs. Mar- 
garet Ackel, Mrs. Maxine South- 
erland and Miss Mary Ellen Rob- 
inson. 

Home economics majors at the 
convention are Joyce Moore of 
Goldonna, Jennifer Jones of Pride 
and Annette Roser of Fort Wal- 
ton, Fla. 

Theme of the annual conven- 
tion is "Focus on Interaction." 
Home economists from through- 
out the nation are participating 
in the week-long program, which 
features sessions on secondary 
and college teaching, extension 
services, business and health and 
welfare. 

Programs are also planned for 
students who are members of 
home economics clubs. 



Northwestern State College 
and Louisiana State University 
have received a joint grant of 
$40,397 for development of a pro- 
gram for comprehensive school 
surveys for the parish school sys- 
tems of Louisiana. 

Designed for school adminis- 
trators and staff personnel, the 
program was awarded by the 
Louisiana Commission on Exten- 
sion and Continuing Education 
and authorized under Title 1 of 
the federal Higher Education Act. 

President Arnold R. Kilpatrick 
said the proposed program will 
be a completely new service of 
the college. 

More than 140o people in the 
state's school system will parti- 
cipate in the program, which will 
feature national consultants in 
school system planning and 
needs. 

Administering the program will 
be Hoyt Reed of Northwestern 
bureau of research and Joe Park 
of LSU. 

The primary purpose of the 
program will be to work with the 
state's school systems in conduct- 
ing surveys on the needs and 
problems of the individual sys- 
tems. 

Information provided by the 
surveys will be in the fields of 
community characteristics, pupil 
population, instructional pro- 

H. C. Semple, supervisor of 
instruction for the Calcasieu Par- 
ish School System, will be at the 
Alumni and Placement Office 
Wednesday, July 7, at 10:30 a.m. 
to interview prospective teachers. 



grams, staff personnel, finance 
and school business management, 
pupil transportation, school plant 
facilities and organization and 
administration. 

The data will be compiled and 
made available for evaluation by 
the superintendent and board of 
education as they consider the 



problems of the operation of the 
educational programs and ser- 
vices. 

Workshops will be conducted 
to inform and train Parish school 
officials in the theory and tech- 
niques of school surveys, and 
survey programs will be demon- 
strated in several parishes. 



College Cleaners 
and Laundry 

Shirts a Speciality 



123 Jefferson Street 



Phone 352-2222 



Shop 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

Where you can find everything your heart 
desires in our complete line of fine jewelery. 

Remember everything sells at DISCOUNT PRICES. 

When downtown stop in and browse around 
1 17 St. Denis Phone 352-6390 



$1.00 

CHICKEN IS KING 



n 



- every Sunday - 

One-half Barbecue Chicken $1.00 

with 

Potato Salad - French Bread 
Hickory Smoked On Our Own Pits 
Picknics - Parties - Families 

$1.00 

at 

Waddle N Grill & Drive In 



Phone 352-4949 



Highway one South 



Wee Waddle N 



Phone 352-8246 



702 College Avenue 



Broadmoor Restaurant 

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Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, June 29, 1967 



'Ask Me No Questions' — An Admirable Performance 



by Frances Toler 

A small record has been set the 
past two nights in the Little The- 
atre of the Fine Arts building. 
It will happen only once again 
tonight. The record is the Sum- 
mer Theatre's production of play- 
wright Lee Edwards' "Ask Me No 
Questions" by eight collegians 
who turned in an admirable per- 
formance after only a week of 
perparation. 

The three-act mystery-Comedy 
centers around the efforts of 
Perry Thornhill (Harvey Wilson), 
famous mystery novelist, to de- 
velop a believable plot and char- 
acterizations in his newest spine- 
tingler. 

Feigning mental disturbance, 
Thornhill summons bumbling 
psychiatrist John Pilsbury (Jim- 
my Monk, who hardly seems able 
to assist a neurotic goldfish) to 
listen to his incredible experience 
with an ice-blooded psychopath- 
namely Jennifer Baxter, portrayed 
by Pam Clark. 

To reveal the intricacies of the 
plot would only spoil the "sur- 
prise" ending. Suffice it to say 
that Thornhill finds himself e- 
meshed in a world of "suicides", 
sleeping tablets and love-starved 
females. 

At times, Wilson's performance 
seems a bit contrived and over- 
done. Perhaps in his effort to 
play Thornhill as a man who op- 
erates on nervous energy, Wil- 

Walker Receives 
Research Grant 

Joseph D. Walker, a junior 
from Elizabeth, La., has been 
awarded a science research grant 
for next year. 

A chemistry major, Walker 
received the grant from the 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science through the 
Louisiana Academy of Sciences. 

Walker's research, supervised 
by Dr. Larry McRae, seeks to 
discover a rapid, accurate method 
for the simultaneous determina- 
tion of magnesium and aluminum. 



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son overtaxes himself. However, 
the part of Thornhill is Wilson's 
first lead, and undoubtedly much 
of this can be attributed to first- 
night jitters. 

Thornhill's escapades center 
around Mrs. Baxter's uncanny 
ability to "hypnotize against the 
will." This she successfully does 
when she supposedly sends Phy- 
llis, Matilda (Anne Weaver), Hil- 
degarde Benson (Susie Chancey), 
Constance Parsons (Nancy Mar- 
tin) into never-never land via 
balls of red fire that leap from 
her eyes. 

Miss Clark's performance is 
somewhat insipid at intervals, 
but then the character she por- 
trays is about as believable as a 
girl scout in a burlesque show. 
Considering that Jennifer Baxter 
is supposed to be able to make 
strong men weep and women 
swoon — all with a fixed stare of 
her baby-blues — Miss Clark does 
the trick about as well as any- 
one. 

One of the brightest spots in 
the production is Phyllis Jack- 
son's amazingly good perform- 
ance as Southern belle in Yan- 
keeland. In her first college 
theatre role, this Natchitoches 
freshman brings to the stage 
more light and energy than some 
of the more experienced players 



of the troupe. 

The scene-stealer of the play, 
however, is Nancy Martin, who 
plays Constance Parsons, a mute 
who is deaf, (but far from dumb). 
Without speaking a line, Miss 
Martin with her black lace hand- 
kerchief creates some of the most 
mirth-provoking scenes of the 
evening. 

Also making a decidedly-good 
contribution as Hildegarde Ben- 
son is speech major Susie Chan- 
cey with her rather obvious at- 
tempts to gain the affections of 
the reluctant Thornhill. Although 
her efforts at underplay seem 
almost too nonchalant, Miss 
Chancey still has the ability to 
make a gesture speak a thousand 



words. 

The fifth member of the fe- 
male sextet is Barbara Tauzin 
who plays Gene Potter, a rather 
slow-witted female detective. At 
times, Miss Tauzin's performance 
is labored and artificial but then, 
she, too, is cast in a role that is 
rather difficult to project. After 
all, how many little girls want 
to grow up to be "G" women? 

Completing the cast is Anne 
Weaver, who with the dour ex- 
pression of a servant who "knows 



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her place", succeeds in giving a 
strong performance in a minor 
role. 

Considering the amount of pre- 
paration, the nature of the play, 
it wasn't a bad effort at all, at 
all, at all. . . 



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auce 



Vol. LIV— No. 4 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 




Monday, July 17, 1967 



Kilpatrick Enters 
President's Post 



MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR SKELETON . . . Construction continues on the three million dollar plus Arts 
and Sciences Building which will house classrooms and special laboratories. This structure is reputedly 
the largest building of its kind in the state. 



Committee Gives 
Dances For End 
Of Summer Term 

The Student Entertainment 
Committee has tentatively sch- 
eduled two dances to close out 
the summer session. The first 
will be held July 18 from 7:30 to 
10:30 p.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom, and the second dance 
is planned for July 27. 

Besides planning summer act- 
ivities, the Student Entertainment 
Committee has been formulating 
entertainment plans for the fall 
semester. Fall entertainment 
tentatively planned includes 
Mitch Ryder in September, Di- 
onne Warwick for October and 
Simon and Garfunkel for Novem- 
ber. 

The social committee is also 
working on plans for setting up 
a system for refunding money to 
students in the event entertain- 
ers scheduled to appear cannot 
fulfill their contracts. 

$54 Fee Increase 
Due Fall Term 

Students enrolling at North- 
western for the fall semester will 
pay an approximate fifty-four 
dollar increase in fees, according 
to figures recently approved and 
released by the college. 

Previously, dormitory cost has 
ranged from $50 to $90. However, 
the fall prices will range from 
$90 to $112. 

Meal tickets must be purchased 
by all students living on campus, 
and only seven day meal tickets 
will be sold. 

There will be two additional 
fees. These include the building 
fee of ten dollars and the Louis- 
iana Alumni council fee of fifty 
cents. 

Last year the highest price for 
registration was $398. This year 
the price will be increased to 
$463.. 

These price increases will af- 
fect only those students living on 
campus, with the exception of 
the two new fees, which must be 
paid by all students. 



Taylor To Give Main Address 
At Commencement Exercises 



Dr. F. Jay Taylor, president of 
Louisiana Tech, will speak at sum- 
mer commencement exercises 
Aug. 4. 

Northwestern President Arnold 
R. Kilpatrick, in making the an- 
nouncement, said the graduation 
ceremonies will be held in Pra- 
ther Coliseum at 8 p.m. 

More than 280 students will re- 
ceive undergraduate and graduate 
degrees during the annual sum- 
mer commencement. 

President of Louisiana Tech 
for the past five years, Taylor is 
a native of Gibsland. After grad- 
uation from Gibsland High School 
in 1940, Taylor attended Louis- 
iana Tech for two years, leaving 
the college to enlist as an avia- 
tion cadet in the United States 
Navy. 

As a Navy fighter plane pilot, 
he logged 2,000 hours of flight 
during World War II. He was 
sent into the Pacific area for 
two tours of duty and rose to the 
rank of lieutenant commander. 

Receiving the bachelor's degree 
in social science form the Uni- 
versity of California, Taylor was 
later awarded his master's degree 
in history from Claremont Grad- 
uate School. He received his doc- 

3,157 Students 
Attend Classes 

Northwestern has reached a 
record summer session enroll- 
ment this year of 3,157. This fig- 
ure exceeds last year's enrollment 
of 3,101, which was the highest 
summer registration in the 
school's history before this ses- 
sion. 

The bulk of the enrollment is 
found in the Graduate School 
with 1,072 students registered. 
This is an increase of 125 students 
over last summer's figure. 

A breakdown in the summer 
enrollment figures shows a total 
of 1,925 women and 1,232 men. 

Enrollment by schools shows 
895 in Education, 458 in Arts and 
Sciences, 452 in Applied Arts 
and Sciences, 280 in Nursing, 
and 1,072 in the Graduate School. 

Housing Director C. L. Starnes 
reports 1,389 students are living 
on campus this summer. Of that 
total, 922 are men and 467 are 
women. 



torate from Tulane University in 
1952 at the age of 29. 

In 1952, Taylor became assoc- 
iate professor of history and go- 
vernment and dean of men at 
Louisiana College. He was elevat- 
ed to Dean of the College in 1960, 
the position he held at the time 
of his appointment as president 
at Louisiana Tech. 

A visiting professor at Louis- 
iana State University for three 
summers, Taylor turned down a 
Fullbright appointment to India 
because of his administrative du- 
ties at Louisiana College. 

Author of two books which 
have won wide acclaim, Taylor 
is chairman of Gov. John Mc- 
Keithen's state committee for 
labor-management. 

FINAL PAPER 

Due to Technical difficulties, 
this will be the final issue of the 
Current Sauce this summer. 
Publication will resume in mid- 
September. 



Dr. Arnold Kilpatrick, acting 
president of the college for the 
past year, has been officially nam. 
ed president. 

Kilpatrick, who joined the NSC 
administration in March of 1966 
as Dean of the College, was nam- 
ed two months later as president 
effective July 1, 1967. 

Under Kilpatrick, Northwestern 
has reached a record enrollment. 
Registration figures last fall soar- 
ed to more than 5,2000, the larg- 
est enrollment ever recorded. En- 
rollment in Kilpatrick's first 
spring as Northwestern's chief 
executive exceeded 4,900, an in- 
crease of more than 700 students 
over the previous spring semester. 

This summer, Northwestern is 
serving more students than in 
any summer in its long history. 
Enrollment this semester is 
3,157. 

Advancement in instruction and 
academic programs have been 
evident in Kilpatrick's term of 
office. 

Northwestern last spring be- 
came the first state college in 
Louisiana to offer a specialist de- 
gree in education. This program 
allows students to secure 30 hours 
beyond the master's degree. 

Six two-year degree programs 
have also been added to the 
Northwestern curriculum. 

Following the recommendations 
of the Southern Association of 
Schools and Colleges, Kilpatrick 
spearheaded a plan to increase 
the academic departments on the 
Northwestern campus from 19 to 
29. The departmental recogani- 
zation will be in operation for the 
fall term. 

The Education Department will 
be divided into four depart- 
ments — Elementary Education, 
Secondary Education, Student 
Teaching, and Guidance and 
Couseling. 

Several areas of study which 
previously were in the Social 
Science Department will become 
separate academic units. These 
include History, Economics, and 
Sociology. 

The Department of Physical 
Sciences will be divided into sep- 
erate departments of Physics, 
Chemistry, and Geology. Other 
new departments will be Account- 
ing and a department of Speech 
and Journalism. 



Northwestern's growth in en- 
rollment and academic offerings 
provide a need for additional 
faculty and staff members, and 
this need has been met. Last year, 
Kilpatrick brought 38 additional 
instructors and 17 more staff 
members to the campus. The col- 
lege faculty now totals 279. 

Presently, Northwestern has 
three new buildings on the draw- 
ing board, in the past year, four 
buildings have been put into op- 
eration, including Sabine Hall, 
women's dormitory; Rapides Hall, 
a dormitory for men; Iberville 
Dining Hall, and the new Stu- 
dent Union Building. 

Architects have nearly com- 




Dr. Arnold R. Kilpatrick 

pleted plans for a new $2 million 
Teacher Education Center. State 
funds have been secured for the 
building, and a federal grant of 
$666,600 has been made available. 
Work should begin in early 1968. 

Also on the drawing board are 
plans for a Life Science Build- 
ing, to be built at a cost of $1.8 
million, and a $1.2 million Wo- 
men's Gymnasium. These build- 
ings should be started in the early 
spring of next year. 

Kilpatrick, who has been in ed- 
ucation in Louisiana for 25 years, 
helped to secure for Northwest- 
ern a $1,188,507 increase in the 
operating budget of the previous 
year. 




BARBARA TAUZIN LOOKS in awe at Jim O'Quinn, who portrays her husband in the Summer Theatre's 
final production of 'Barefoot in the Park', which begins Tuesday. Gazing rather absently at the telephone 
is Lake Charles freshman Bill Stratton. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Monday, July 17, 1967 



uttle man on campus ' Barefoot' Ends Summer Season 




Rehearsals are now in progress 
in the Fine Arts Building for 
"Barefoot in the Park," Summer 
Treatre Workshop's final pro- 
duction of the summer season. 
The three-act comedy, which re- 
cently closed in New York with 
over a thousand performances to 
its credit, is scheduled to open 
in the Little Theatre July 25 for 
a three-night run. 

Leading the cast are Summer 
Theatre Workshop students Bar- 
bara Tauzin and Jim O'Quinn. 



Barbara, a French major from 
Natchitoches, will play Corrie 
Bratter, a zestful young newly- 
wed beginning life in a one-room 
New York brownstone with her 
lawyer husband, Paul Bratter. 
Protraying Paul is DeQuincy 
English-journalism major Jim O'- 
Quinn. 

Nancy Martin, speech major 
from Lake Charles, is featured as 
Corrie's mother, Mrs. Banks, and 
Harvey Wilson of Vinton will 



Annual Summer Tours Leave 
Campus In Early August 



"Sometimes a ppofessop may ee a little late in 

<^P1NG HIS F1NAU6 IN TIME FOfc cSRAPUATION." 



Sixty-four persons have regis- 
tered for Norhwestern's annual 
summer educational tours to Eur- 
ope and the Southwest United 
States and Hawaii. 

Scheduled to begin Aug. 3, the 
European tour will continue 
through Aug. 24, and the United 
States tour will end Aug. 26. 

Northwestern has been conduct- 
ing the educational tours in the 
United States since 1950. This 
year will mark the fourth time 
the college has conducted the 



State Election Changes 
Date Of Homecoming 



The date of the 1967 Home- 
coming has been changed to 
October 28, 1967 due to a state- 
wide election on November 4th. 
The date was changed for the 
benefit of voting alumni through- 
out the state. 

The Governor, State Board of 
Education, and other state dig- 
nitaries have been invited as spe- 
cial guests. 

The slate of events will begin 
with the Alumni Coffee and Reg- 
istration. Campus visitation will 
be ofered to the Alumni at this 
time through guided tours. 

The second Annuai Campus 
Decorations Contest will again 
replace the Homecoming Parade. 
Various groups participating in 
the contest are residence halls, 
sororities and fraternities, relig- 



ious centers, departmental groups 
and honorary organizations. Pri- 
zes will be awarded to the best 
displays. 

The "N" Club Meeting and A- 
lumni Barbecue will complete the 
morning's activities. 

The gridiron contest with NSC 
vs. Troy State of Troy, Alabama 
will kickoff at 2:30 p.m. During 
Pre-Game Ceremonies, special 
guests will be recognized and the 
1967 Homecoming Court present- 
ed 

The "N" Club Grads Get To- 
gether following the game will 
complete the afternoon's activi- 
ties. 

An Alumni Dance honoring A- 
lumni, students and their guests 
will spotlight the evening's en- 
tertainment. 



Majorette, T wirier Try-outs 

For NSC Band In Progress 

Try-outs for majorette and twir- Many, Louisiana, and a graduate 

ler positions with the NSC Band of Stephen F. Austin College, 

will be held during the one-week Applicants for the camp thus 

Twirling Camp — July 16-21. far are Lynn Nollkemper, Sharon 

Twirler candidates will attend Parker, Brenda Stringfield, Joy 

all of the high school twirling Lynn Kilpatrick. Shirley Weaver, 

camp classes during this week Karen Robichaux, Dianne Bigher, 

and college-age students will work Jamie Richert, Dee Dee Town- 

on their try-out routine in sep- send, Star Autrey, Brenda Wilson, 

arate classes. They will perform Susan Roberson, Candy Flournoy, 

their routine at the try-outs. Their Charlotte Sullivan, and Gayle 

routine will determine the can- McMillan. Any additional candid- 

didates ability to learn the type ates should contact Mr. J. Robert 

of routines that the twirling line Smith. Director of Bands, in the 

will use during the 1967-68 foot- Fine Arts Band office as soon as 

ball half-time shows. The group possible. 

routine will be in addition to 

each candidates solo routine. Am li I \rt rA ^<a!«artorl 

The instructor for the camp / *9 U, "W»« ^eieCTea 

will be Mrs. Wanda Hanzen from _ ^ , _ . 

Prexy Of Nurses 

II rr«ar>t ^frauriQ Kathy Aguillard was recently 

— installed President of the Stu- 

established 1914 dent Government Association of 

Entered as second class matter at the the Shreveport Clinical Campus. 

Natchitoches Post Office under the act Other oficers Serving with Miss 

of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- a_ mi j ■ i j tt -it 

oept during holidays and test weeks, in Aguillard include Harriet Lowery, 

tne fail and spring, and bi-weekly in the First Vice-President; Angelica 

summer by the Student Body of North- D . „. — r ' 

western State College of Louisiana. Sub- KurrOWS, Second Vice-President; 

c ription $3 the year payable in advance. Suzis Adams, Secretary; Doris 

Member of the Associated Collegiate Balthazar, Treasurer; Rynnie Zel- 

Press ler, Social Chairman; Bridget 

Frances Toier Editor Wallace, Reporter; Sharyne Mou- 

AUce Anne Conner .... Associate Editor ser, Parlimentarian; and Gwen 

^^^.ZZZZTb^^u^ Bass, chairman of the nominating 

Shelby Lacroix Circulation Mgr. committee. Other members of the 

frX r 1^ s 1nd h s n te e v y e iZ n °' Qui " n ' nominating committee are Rita 

— Hedges and Jonette Savage. 

Ed"oriaIs reflect only the opinions of . , 

members of the staff. They do net re- Ine two advisors for the aSSO- 

npr-* 1he opinions of the student body ciation arp Franr-ps nalmo anH 

or the administration and faculty of the "«V- 1U " <» e * ranees .uaime ana 

i<-je. Lois Malkemes. 



Mr. Harrel Haile, Head of A- 
lumni and Placement, is Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee. 
This committe coordinates the en- 
tire celebration. 

Other committees responsible 
for various facets include Cam- 
pus Decorations, Coffee and Reg- 
istration, Pre-Game and Half-Time 
Activities, Luncheon, Publicity, 
and Campus Dance. 

"All activities are pending the 
meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee," according to Haile. 

Rod And Gun Club 
Siphons Lake Of 
Sediment And Silt 

Scenic Chaplain's Lake on the 
college campus will be completely 
drained this summer in an effort 
to improve the condition of the 
lake. 

Sylvan Nelken, president of 
the Natchitoches Rod and Gun 
Club, which holds a long-term 
lease on the lake, said refilling 
would not begin until some time 
next winter. 

Nelken said the lake was being 
drained because of a buildup of 
sediment and tons of silt which 
have come into the body from 
Sibley Lake. He said that there 
had been a tremendous buildup 
of algae due to the silt that has 
accumulated in the water. 

The lake is being lowered 
through a 14-inch spill pipe and 
has been going down about five 
inches a day. 

Nelken said the lake, which 
covers 18 acres, would probably 
drain completely in a little over 
a week. The dam will be cut to 
let water out of the lake after the 
effectiveness of the spill pipe 
has ended. 

Improved fishing is the primary 
purpose of the club in draining 
the lake. Nelken said this would 
be the first time in history that 
the lake had been completely 
emptied. 

The Rod and Gun Club has 
held the lease on the mile-long, 
willow-lined lake for more than 
70 years. It was leased from the 
State Board of Education. 

Assisting with the project is 
Dr. Ray Baumgardner of the Bi- 
ology Department. 



European tour. 

Six semester hours of under- 
graduate or graduate credit may 
be earned on the tour, but inter- 
ested persons can take the tour 
with or without credit. 

The Southwestern United States 
tour includes Texas, New Mexico, 
Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Califor- 
nia and Colorado. Tour partici- 
pants will also have an opportun- 
ity to go on to Hawaii. 

Among countries included on 
the European tuor are Ireland, 
England, Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Germany and France. 

Signees for the European tour 
total 20, and there are 44 who 
have signed up for the United 
States tuor. Vacancies are still 
available. 

FIRST NAME MEASURE 

Your attitude toward your first 
name is a measure of your self- 
esteem, the Catholic Digest finds. 
Columbia University studies 
show that persons who answer 
Yes to the question, "Do you feel 
your name is you?" tend to think 
much more highly of themselves 
than those who do not like their 
names. Of the 400 subjects of the 
study, those who disliked their 
first names were also markedly 
dissatisfied with themselves. 



play "the man from upstairs," 
Victor Velasco. Bill Stratton of 
Lake Charles is featured as the 
telephone man. 

The story line follows Corrie's 
and Paul's first night in the new 
apartment, a night on the town 
with Mrs. Velasco and Corrie's 
mother, and what happens when 
Paul will not walk barefoot in the 
park in 17 degree weather and 
newlyweds di scover that they 
have "absolutely nothing in com- 
mon." The scene remains in the 
apartment for all three acts, with 
furniture changes. 

College Theatre Director Dr. 
Edna West is directing the pro- 
duction, with Frank Magers as 
Technical Director. Phyliss Jack- 
son, summer workshop student, 
will be assistant to the director. 

Grad School Hits 
Record Enrollment 
This Summer 

Some 1,072 students are enrol- 
led in the Graduate School this 
summer, marking the school's 
largest enrollment in the history 
of the college. 

Established in 1954, the Gradu- 
ate School has more than doubled 
in size in the last three years. 

Dean of the Graduate School 
Leo Allbritton attributes the rap- 
id rise in enrollment to the great 
need for education today. 

The majority of the enrollment 
is in the field of education with 
the largest percentage in the 
field of elementary teaching. 

Although many of the students 
commute from surrounding areas, 
all fifty states and many foreign 
countries are represented in the 
enrollment. 



Funny Thing... 



By Alice Anne Conner 

A funny thing happened the 
other day when I decided to have 
my own, private lie-in. 

Now, before too many eyebrows 
shoot to the hairlines, let me 
make it clear that I was lieing 
alone, accompanied only by a 
book of Wordsworth's poems, a 
yellow laundry marker, and sun- 
glasses. 

As a matter of fact, I hadn't 
really intended for my actions to 
be constred as a lie-in, but things 
sort of got out of hand. 

There I was, lieing under a tree 
reading poetry and soaking up 
Mother Nature's rays of sunlight 
and showers of crepe-myrtle. 
Suddenly I noticed several peo- 
ple stopping and looking at me. 

"What are you doing," one puz- 
zled looking student asked me. 

"Why, I'm sitting under this 
tree and reading poetry," I an- 
swered in a tone usually reserved 
for babies and dogs. 

"Why," asked another. 

"Yea, what for," came the ech- 
oes. 

Before I could explain my sim- 
ple purpose in being where I was, 
there came shouts of "lie-in! ! We- 
'rehavin' a lie-in!" 

"No, no, nothing like that," I 
assured them. "I just want to soak 
up the sun and think about the 
things around me for a while." 

Their faces looked question-fil- 
led and awed. Like they had never 
heard of "sun" or "think"— or 
something. 

"Oh, I get it," said one bespeck- 
led graduate student, "She's got 
a class and she's thought of a 
new way to cut it." 

Quieting the enlarging rage in 
my throat, I calmly asked the 



wise one to stop blocking my sun 
and carry it back to the Student 
Union where I had noted seeing 
him every time I went there. 

"And just what's wrong with 
the Student Union," he continued. 
"You don't like coffee and con- 
versation?" 

"Yes," I answered, (still calm), 
"I love coffee and conversation is 
fine. But sometimes it's good to 
walk around the campus and sit 
down when you want to, pust en- 
joying the scenery and atmos- 
phere." 

Laughing unbelievingly, the 
heckler tripped his way toward 
the SU and the crowd began to 
dwindle. Some of them laughed. 
Some of them just smiled. And 
some still looked puzzled. 

By then, it was time for another 
class, and I irritatedly left my 
spot and started walking toward 
the biology building, feeling a 
little silly. 

But behold! What did I see a- 
head of me but three boys sit- 
ting under a pine tree! Just sit- 
ting. And further on were several 
more people lieing on their backs, 
looking at the sky! 

"What's going on," I asked one 
of the groups. 

"Haven't you heard? We're 
having a lie-in," one replied. 

Amazed, I asked them what a 
lie-in was. 

"We don't know," one answer- 
ed, "but it's a welcome change 
from sitting in classrooms, dorm- 
itories and the Student Union. 
Someone should have thought of 
it sooner." 

Yes sir, someone should have 
thought of it sooner. . . 



Monday, July 17, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Head Demon Prophesies 
One Loss For GSC Champs 



With the football season a bit 
more than two months away, 
Glenn Gossett, the Demon's head 
football coach, refused to fore- 
cast a repeat perfect season, pre- 
dicted that the Gulf States Con- 
ference champion would lose at 
least one game, and, at the same 
time, firmly declared that he 
didn't feel any undue pressure 
about inheriting a winner. 

The tall, broad-shouldered Gos- 
sett, who even looks like a foot- 
ball coach, gave these answers to 
the following questions: 

Reporter: What do you expect 
this fall, another perfect record? 

Gossett: I don't think you ever 
go into a season expecting. . . We 
are going to play them one at a 
time and let everything take care 
of itself. For instance, some 
coaches plan ahead for home- 
coming and lose every game until 
homecoming. Right now we're 
only worrying about one game, 
and that's our first one with Han- 
over. 

Reporter: Do you think that 
the Demons will be an improved 
team over what they were last 
year, if that's possible? 

Gossett: I'll say this, the GSC 
will be better. I see an improve- 
ment everywhere. . . .at North- 
east, Southeastern, McNeese, 
Southwestern, Tech. Everywhere 
there has been improvement, 
and there had better be an im- 
provement here. 

Reporter: If you should have a 
perfect season, along with a na- 
tional rating, would you want to 
go to a national playoff or a bowl 
game? 

Gossett : Like I said, all we are 
thinking about is Hanover. But 
I will add this, all my experiences 
with post-season activity have 
been very enjoyable. 

Reporter: Who will start at 
quarterback this year, Malcolm 
Lewis or Donald Guidry? 

Gossett: I don't have any idea. 
Both are real fine quarterbacks 
from what I have seen so far. In 
spring practice, we didn't make 
any distinction between them, 



but we will have to go with one of 
them when the time comes. Re- 
gardless of who starts, both of 
them will see a lot of action. 

Reporter: Were you satisfied 
with spring training? 

Gossett: Very definitely. We 
don't have it made, but we are 
satisfied with our progress. The 
boys had a real fine attitude this 




GOSSETT tells how it feels to 
inherit a champion ball club and 
also makes some predictions 
about what lies ahead for the 
Demons. 



spring, even though some of them 
had to work a little harder than 
they were used to. 

Reporter: Then you didn't have 
any discipline problems? 



Gossett: No. Just those that 
might be called very routine. 

Reporter: What defense and 
offense will you use? 

Gossett: A double-monster, odd- 
man line on defense and a tan- 
dem "I" on offense. The tandem 
"I" is used by such teams as 
Southern California, Arkansas, 
and Texas Tech. Coach McKay 
at Southern Cal was probably 
the person who developed the "I" 
so we know it today. 

Reporter: What team or teams 
in the GSC do you fear the most? 

Gossett: I couldn't pick one. 

Reporter: Do you have any 
weak spots on the team? 

Gossett: Not in particular. We 
don't have a game-breaker of- 
fensively, that is, someone who 
is a threat to score every time 
he gets his hands on the ball. We 
also need more depth. 

Reporter: Do you feel the pres- 
sure of being named coach of, 
perhaps, the number one small 
college team in the country? 

Gossett: I don't worry about 
pressure. I'm going to do the best 
job 1 can and not worry about it. 
I have an excellent coaching staff, 
and I'm sure that they're going 
to do the best job that they can. 
Everything will work out. 

Reporter: How many returning 
lettermen do you have? 

Gossett: I don't know without 
looking it up. I'm not so much 
interested in knowing who's a 
letterman as I am in who's a foot- 
ball player. 



save at 



UNITED DOLLAR STORE 

Fish net seamless Hose, Assorted colors $1.00 
White Rain Shampoo only 79c 
Hazel Bishop Hair Spray — 2 for $1.00 
Gleem, Crest tooth paste, large size — 2 for $1.00 

Located in Broadmoor Shopping Center 

We do cash student checks 



Move Up The Right Way 

Valuable people move up with North American. Just ask their 
companies. Our employer-paid moves increase dramatically year 
after year. The word's out that valuable people demand special 
care. Otherwise, why would their companies specify North 
American? Move up with North American. It cost no more. Ask 
about new Budget Plan Moving . . . very practical for Junior 
Executives. 

NATCHITOCHES TRANSFER 
& STORAGE 

NORTH AMERICAN 
VAN LINES 

The GENTLEmen 
of the Moving 
Industry 

Hwy. 1 South 





Phone 
352-8742 
352-5225 



Patronize 

Our 
Advertisers 



Shop 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

Where you can find everything your heart 
desires in our complete line of fine jewelery. 

Remember everything sells at DISCOUNT PRICES. 

When downtown stop in and browse around 
1 1 7 St. Denis Phone 352-6390 



GRADUATING? 




You should have your picture made. Show your 
appreciation to those who have helped you by 
giving them this important momento. 
We have gowns. 

Call Guillet's Studio TODAY at 352-2381 
Second at Amulet Street 

— We make job application pictures too — 



DAILY SPECIALS 



Waddle N Grill 
& Drive In 



Phone 352-4949 
Highway one South 



SPECIALS 



NIGHT SPECIALS 



Fresh Cat Fish Daily 

Broadmoor Restaurant 

10% discount for all college students 

Phone 352-6120 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 



DAILY SPECIALS 



Wee Waddle N 



Phone 352-8246 
702 College Avenue 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Monday, July 17, 1967 



Pragmatically Speaking . . . 



A national magazine said re- 
cently that today's younger gen- 
eration's single ideal is prag- 
matism: The value of an object 
or action is whether it works. 
This was never more evident 
than today, comments the Xavier 
News, Xavier University, Cinv 
cinnati. 

Today's student looks at the 
economic system and finds entire 
nations facing starvation in the 
midst of plenty. Entire segments 
of society — the Negro, the Mex- 
ican, the Indian — face economic 
segregation and the impossibility 
of social advancement. 

He looks at the Vietnam war 
as a failure — either because we 
are there in the first place or 
because there is a lack of firmness 
in the nation's leadership. Wash- 
ington fluctuates from hot to 
cold in seeking the almighty con- 
sensus and the indecision, or 
failure to communicate, strikes 
the student as being worse than 
the war itself. To die for a just 
cause is one thing, but to fear 
that the sacrifice may be cheated 
of all significance causes one to 
hesitate. 

He looks at the civil rights 
movement as lacking in perspec- 
tive. Negroes realize, as so few 
whites do, that they have been 
cheated, yet they go to the op- 
posite extreme in trying to erase 
100 years of discrimination. 
Society cannot be remade over- 
night. For the Negro to act con- 
temptuously of whites is just as 
wrong as the white man's attitude 
in the first place. 

The most startling expression 
of youth's pragmatism is its view 
of education. Colleges are packed 
to the breaking point and still 
the relentless search for the key 
to the world continues. Every 
major research program is dom- 
inated by youth; the greatest ad- 
vancements in every field are 
made by the under-30 genera- 
tion — yet dissatisfaction with the 
world continues. 

What goal is pragmatism seek- 
ing? Is this generation the first 

175 Enrolled 
In Summer 
Music Camp 

About one-hundred and seventy- 
five students are enrolled in the 
Annual Summer Music Camp for 
Junior and Senior High School 
students. 

The camp which is being held 
from July 9-21, includes daily 
band and chorus rehearsals, in- 
dividual and group instruction, 
classes in theory, music apprecia- 
tion and conducting. 

The music camp staff includes 
Joseph B. Carlucci, administra- 
tion, Jack White, concert band, 
Wallace Van Sickle, cadet band, 
Wanda Hanzen, twirling, Walter 
Minniear, flute conducting, Thom- 
as Latham, music appreciation, 
Robert Grambling, low brass, 
Glenda Bates, piano, Ralph Ir- 
ving, trumpet, Noel Tipton, pi- 
ano, Richard Jennings, French 
horn, Linda Williams, twirling, 
Pam Pearce, twirling assistant, 
Sharon Parker, twirling assistant, 
Robert Willis, oboe, and Jerry R. 
Payne, bassoon. 



to realize that the utopia sought 
by the 18th and 19th century 
idealist is really impossible? It 
is, admittedly, a utopia of slightly 
different definition — an equality 
of mankind. And it is the search 
for this equality that creates the 
impatience with which the Viet- 
nam war and the civil rights 
movement are viewed. It is as 
if the younger generation is say- 
ing to its elders, "You are doing 
it all wrong; let us show you the 
way." 

But although youth may possess 
the answers, age still controls the 
apparatus and the gap between 
the two is infinite. One refuses 
to recognize the other; the other 
refuses to wait. 

Demons Sign 
All-State Pitcher 

Monroe Thompson, All-State 
pitcher and outfielder from Pit- 
kin, has signed a baseball grant- 
in-aid with the Demons. 

Thompson, who posted an 8-3 
record this season, struck out 82 
batters in 62 frames on the hill. 

In addition to his pitching 
prowness, Thompson was an out- 
standing batter, marking up a 
.485 average this season. He hit 
30 home runs in three seasons. 

Selected to the All-State and 
All-District team for the past 
three seasons, Thompson was 
named the District's Most Valu- 
able Player this season. 

Also an outstanding basketball 
player, Thompson was All-State 
this year and picked on four All- 
Tournament teams. 

Coach Jack Clayton said, "Not 
only are we getting a topnotch 
baseball player, Thompson is also 
a good student. He was president 
of his junior class and also an 
officer in other campus organi- 
zations. We think he is a poten- 
tial leader." 

Civil War Diary 
Donated To 
Russell Library 

A ten-volume diary kept by 
Felix Pierre Poche' during the 
Civil War has been donated to 
the Louisiana Room of the Rus- 
ell Library by Mrs. Dewey A. 
Somdal of Shreveport. 

According to Miss Katherine 
Bridges, the Poche' diary gives 
new material on the Battle of 
Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, Man- 
sura and Yellow Bayou. Poche' 
served as Captain of a company 
of infantry which was attached 
to the staff of Gen. Mouton, and 
kept a detailed daily account of 
his experiences and observations 
during the war. 

The dairy, which is written in 
French and English, has been 
transcribed and translated by 
Mrs. Somdal, who is Poche's 
granddaughter. Dr. Yvonne Phil- 
lips, director of Louisiana Stud- 
ies Institute, has announced that 
the diary will be issued as a 
monograph by the Institute in 
the near future. 



Social Studies 
Workshop Held 

A Social Studies Workshop was 
held recently for social studies 
teachers throughout the area. 

More than 200 teachers attend- 
ed the day-long session which 
gave instruction and guidance in 
five areas of social studies teach- 
ing — kindergarten through third 
grade, fourth through sixth grade, 
seventh through eighth grade 
and two sessions for social stud- 
ies in the secondary schools. 

A joint project of the State 
Board of Education and North- 
western's Department of Educa- 
tion, the workshop was directed 
by Dean of Education T. P. South- 
erland and Dr. Frank Mobley, 
assistant professor of education. 

Consultants for the workshop 
were several Northwestern super- 
vising teachers, Mrs. LeRoi Ever- 
sull, Mrs. Edwina Mayeaux, and 
Mrs. Lora Butler worked in the 
lower grades and Miss Ruby Bo- 
gan of Castor and Miss Yvonne 



I'D LIKE TO HAVE an enchan- 
ted evening — wouldn't you — with- 
out the consequences. 



OFTEN AN EMPLOYEE with 
no experience turns out better 
than one with too much. 



IF YOU LOVE ME please don't 
say it with a greeting card. 

Coffey of Shreveport worked in 
the secondary program. 

The principal speaker for the 
workshop was Jim Oxendine, con- 
sultant for Rand-McNally Corp. 



GRILLETTE - ALDREDGE 
JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Bulova & Elgin Watches 
Watchmaking & Engraving 
A Specialty 

582 Front Street 
Phone 352-3166 



Fountain Blue 
Restaurant 

Hot Lunches 
Steaks 
Sea Foods 

For the Best 
Food and Service 

Highway 1 South 
Phone 352-8059 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day service on Dry Cleaning 
Laundry Service 

Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday afternoon after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 

Conveniently located near the campus 



Also — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

One hour Service Until 3 
One day Service on Laundry 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 

Super-Fast Service 



P & C Drug Company 

Vitalis Liquid $1.09 for 71c 
98c Gillette Foamy only 66c 
$1.75 size V05 Creme Rinse 79c 
$3.50 Clairol Uncurl only $2.04 

14 oz. Listerine $1.09 for 69c 
$8.95 Playtex Nurser for $6.75 



116 Touline Street 



Phone 352-2355 



Fast Free Delivery 



Medic Economy Pharmacy 

Born Blonde $2.50 for $1.67 
$3.50 Curl Free only $2.16 
Fast Permanent $2.00 for 76c 
Gillette Super Stainless 10's Reg. $1.45 for 76c 
89c Score for 56c 
White Rain Hair Spray $1.25 for 84c 



202 Williams Ave. 



Phone 352-8366 



TEACHERS WANTED 

Southwest, Entire West 

And Alaska 
Salaries $5400 Up— Free 

Registration 
SOUTHWEST TEACHERS 

AGENCY 
1303 Central Ave., N. E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



I 



DON 



Office Opens 
I Mon-Fri — 5:45 
| Sat, Sun — 12:45 

— Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 

Now Showing 

Anthony Quinn 
Martha Hyer 

"THE 
HAPPENING" 

in color 
Starts Thursday 

John Wayne 
Robert Mitchum 

"ELDORADO" 

in color 

Starts July 26 

Debbie Reynolds 
Dick Van Dyke 

"DIVORCE 
AMERICAN 
STYLE" 

Color 



CHIEF, 

D R I VE,- 1 N x , 



Tonight - Tuesday i 



Elvis Presley 

"DOUBLE 
TROUBLE" 
in color 

Wednesday 
"Bucknight" 

Double Horror 
Feature ! 

'RASPUTIN THE 
MAD MONK" 

— PLUS — 




"THE 
REPTILE" 

Both in Color 



III 



Thursday - Friday i 

Yul Brynner 

'TRIPPLE CROSS' I 

Color 

Saturday 

Elvis Presley 

"FRANKIE AND ffVI 
JOHNNY" 

— Plus — 

Ann-Margret 
Red Buttons 
Bing Crosby 

"STAGECOACH' 

Color 



SGA PROPOSES AMENDMENT 



Cheerleaders — Selected Or Elected? 




CONTESTS AND CONTROVERSY— Members of the 1967 Demon Cheerleading Squad receive honors 
from College President Arnold Kilpatrick as cheerleader election becomes the subject this week of a new 
constitutional amendment proposed by the Student Government Association. This group, including (left 
to right) Gary Foster, Ann Gibson, Patti Doucet, Carol Smith, Vickie Todd, Dewayne Wicks, and Joe 
Bevaqua, won second place in small group competition at the annual National Spirit and Sportsmanship 
Workshop at the University of Southern Mississippi. 



By Diane Nickerson, Editor 

Cheerleaders will no longer be 
elected by popular vote but be 
selected by a student-faculty scre- 
ening committee if a proposed 
Student Government Association 
amendment is passed by the 
student body in a forthcoming 
general election. 

The selection of college cheer- 
leaders by a committee, as pro- 
posed in the suggested SGA 
amendment, is a common practice 
in most colleges and universities 
in the state and nation. 

All cheerleader candidates, un- 
der the constitutional amend- 
ment, would be judged on their 
tumbling and yell skills by a com- 
mittee composed of the football 
and basketball coaches, gymnas- 
tics instructor, athletic director, 
SGA president, School Spirit 



committee head and dance in- 
structor. 

Quarter scholarships will be 
given to the cheerleaders with 
the head cheerleader earning a 
half scholarship, according to 
SGA Treasurer Scotty Maxwell, 
who introduced the new method 
of cheerleader selection. 

Also under the new admend- 
ment, cheerleaders would be re- 
quired to attend a workshop in 
Hattisburg, Miss., for further in- 
struction. Cheerleaders selected 
under this new proposal would 
be required to attend every pos- 
sible sports event and those not 
functioning capably would be re- 
lieved from their positions. 

As emphasized by Treasurer 
Maxwell, this new proposal is not 
to criticize the present cheer- 
leaders, but to alleviate some re- 
(See SGA, Page 8) 



Faculty, Students 
Select 24 Who's 
Who Candidates 

Thirty-four Northwestern State 
College students have been nam- 
ed to Who's Who Among Students 
in American Universities and Col- 
leges for the 1967-68 school year. 

Selection for Who's Who is bas- 
ed on leadership, scholarship and 
service to the college, according 
to Dean of Students Dudley Ful- 
ton. 

Students were nominated for 
the honor at dormitory meetings 
and sessions of student-faculty se 
lection committees last spring. 

The selection of the 34 North- 
western students was announced 
this week by H. Pettus Randall, 
editor of ihe Who's Who publi- 
cation. 

The 34 students selected from 
Northwestern are Danny Turner, 
John Ramsey, Jere Daye, Dennis 
Newbury and John Landrem, all 
of Shreveport; Shelly Dickie, 
Wayne Horn, Neal Prather, David 
Smith, Bossier City. 

Others selected were David 
Butler, Mrs. Shirley Butler, San- 
dra Stephens, Catherine Wall, 
Alexandria; Patricia Grob, An- 
nette Wallace, Pineville; Tommy 
Champlin, Jonesville; Mrs. Shir- 
ley Dickie, Natchitoches; Dianne 
Dickerson, Jan Warren, Winn- 
field; Norma Foshee, Mansfield. 

Joe Germany, New Iberia; Don- 
ald Guidry, Church Point; Lela 
Mae Lea, Pride; Malcolm Lewis, 
Marshall, Tex., Robert Mock, 
Slagle; Sue Peterson, Norfolk, 
Va.; Louise Riehl, Ville Platte; 
Linda Robicheaux, Baton Rouge; 
Sydney Storey, Monterey; Fran- 
ces Toler, Crowley; Michele Var- 
nado, Monroe; Wanda Willis, 
Elizabeth; Jimmie Woods, Min- 
den, and Paula Wright, Port Sul- 
phur. 




urrent 



auce 



Vol. LIV— No. 5 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Friday, September 22, 1967 



Mitch Ryder Concert Wednesday 
To Lead Off Entertainment Series 



Variety is the keynote, as 
the Student Government As- 
sociation serves up a heaping 
helping of outstanding vocal 
entertainment for the fall, 
beginning Wednesday with 
the Mitch Ryder Show at 8 
p.m. in the Coliseum. 

"I Found a Love" is the title of 
the song, and now Mitch Ryder is 
on the floor with the mike; he is 
on his knees almost crawling, 
moaning whatever comes into his 
mind, only feet away from the 
girls who are pressed against the 



stage shrieking and sighing and 
trying to get at him. His voice is 
low-down, savage, gutteral; the 
words disappearing into primitive 
cacophony — "ooh, ohh...ah, ah.... 
..eeeeee!" 

— Newsday Magazine 

Soul music is the name of the 
game, and the spectacular per- 
formances of the 22-year-old sing- 
er Mitch Ryder have caused ex- 
citement at such places as the 
University of Detroit, Queens Col- 
lege in Canada, Colgate Univer- 
sity and the RKO in Manhattan. 

The Ryder concert will be the 



Help! Cry Freshmen- 
College Orders Signs 



There were almost two thousand 
of them, and for those first few 
days not less than half of them 
were lost. 

The problem of a sprawling, 
expanding, unfamiliar campus 
was a serious one for The Fresh- 
men, 1967, but the administra- 
tion, just one month late, is do- 
ing somethiing about it. 

More than 150 large steel 
signs, in appropriate shades of 
purple and white, will be in place 
by October to identify every 
building and street on the cam- 
pus, according to President Ar- 
nold R. Kilpatrick. 

The new signs will be used in 
the future to make identification 
of sites on the campus easier for 
both students and visitors, Presi- 



dent Kilpatrick said. The new 
buildings, new streets and other 
physical exp'ansiioVi htis maed 
better marking of campus sites 
a necessity, he added. 
Signs used in front of buildings 
will be a foot deep and five feet 
wide. Street signs, exactly like 
traic markers used in cities 
throughout the nation, will be 
six inches deep and 29 inches 
wide, with white reflector let- 
tering on a purple background. 
Both the building signs and 
street markers will be placed on 
10-foot galvanized tubular posts. 

Kilpatrick also announced the 
naming of the new street which 
circles 'in front of Rapides and 
Sabine Halls and Iberville Cafe- 
teria — the street has been label- 
ed Demon Drive. 



first in the Student Entertain- 
ment Series, announced this 
month by Bill Fowler, vice-presi- 
dent of the SGA. 

Also scheduled are the Plat- 
ters, Oct. 18; Simon and Garfun- 
kel, Nov. 14; and the Serendipity 
Singers, Dec. 2 

Tickets good for all four shows 
are now on sale at the student 
government office for both stu- 
dents and the general public. Ad- 
vance tickets for the four perfor- 
mances are priced at $3.50 each 
and tickets purchased for one or 
more of the shows individually 
will range in price from $2 to 
$3.50. 

The Platters, who have ben 
making popular recordings for 
12 years, have made guest appear- 
ances on almost every major tele- 
vision variety show and have ap- 
peared in six motion pictures. 
They have been twice voted the 
"World's Most Outstanding Vocal 



Group." 

Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, 
since their first million-seller 
single recording, "The Sounds of 
Silence," have been acclaimed as 
the most creative and unusual of 
the folk-rock musicians of our 
day. First popular in Greenwich 
Village coffehouses, they moved 
on to performances at the Edin- 
burgh Folk Festival and the Trou- 
bador and Enterprise in London, 
then to become one of the most 
important recording groups in the 
United States. 

The Serendipity Singers will 
close out the fall series with their 
self-contained act of pop-folk 
vocal music, instrumentals, and 
comedy. This group became prom- 
inent after their first album be- 
came a hit, and from it came a 
smash single recording, "Don't 
Let the Rain Come Down." 

All concerts will begin at 8 p.m. 
in the Coliseum. 



SU Steps Up Campus Tempo With. 
Variety, Entertainment, Education 



By Charles Skinner 

It's where it's happening, baby 
— the new multifunctioning NSC 
Student Union which houses al- 
most every conceivable type of 
entertainment and activity. 

Setting out to make college life 
a more educational and enjoyable 
experience, Student Union offi- 
cials have initiated a program of 
entertainment and learning op- 
portunity which has changed stu- 
dent life throughout the campus. 

Among the free privileges 
available to the students is the 
Browsing Room for those who 



enjoy reading magazines in the 
comfort of padded chairs, huge 
footstools, air-conditioning and 
soft music. 

Almost next door is the Music 
Listening Room, once replete 
with comfortable easy chairs and 
an elaborate stereo system fea- 
turing everything from the Bea- 
tles and the Tijuana Brass to 
Bach 

For the avid student who 
chooses to punctuate his study 
periods with more active past- 
imes there is the Games Room 
with bowling, snooker, cards, 
chess and pool. 



One of the more popular pas- 
times is mailcheck; a time in 
which even if one receives no 
mail he may usually find a girl 
who would like a coke. This 
leads us to the next area, the 
Food Service Department where 
students may become better ac- 
quainted in their leisure hours. 

Then for the student who inad- 
vertently leaves his books some- 
where or loses his way there is 
the information booth) offering 
a friendly smile, good advice, and 
an available Lost and Found 
Service. 




"SOCK IT TO ME, BABY," Mitch Ryder's most recent hit, will be one 
of many musical offerings in store for the thousands who hear the 
young singer in concert Wednesday night. Tickets for the performance 
are on sale in the Student Union. 



f 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 22, 1967 



DIARY OF A FRESHMAN 



The Registration Syndrome 



(EDITOR'S NOTE: Registration, 
a peril that must be faced by all 
NSC students, is a maddening ex- 
perience and one that never 
seems to change. Even with the 
recent innovation of registration 
by computers, the enrolling pro- 
cess is still complicated, exhaust- 
ing and aggravating. To show 
that registration hasn't really 
changed much in recent years,we 
are repeating an ■ article which 
appeared in the Sept. 24, 1965. 
issue of the SAUCE.) 

Registration. 

There, before me in awesome 
disarray, lay an immense, incom- 
prehensible jungle. Fear gripped 
me — wild, cowardly faar, that 
made my ears turn pale yellow. I 
quickly decided to do a three 
year stretch in Viet Nam, and 
come back to college later, when 
I was a man. But then I thought 
what my Dad would say ("What 
do you mean they won't give you 
back the $25 room deposit?!), 
and besides, I knew if I walked 
out I would have to face the vi- 
cious young men who shoved 
cards in my face and yelled "Pick- 
up and delivery service!" (I had 
signed four times already.) At 
my hesitation someone handed 
me papers and cards and said 



"fill these out." Three hours later 
they pushed me onto the coliseum 
floor. 

Mind Went Blank 

At that moment I realized I 
had forgotten the name of my 
advisor, the name of my dorm, 
and the name of my major. I 
looked it up. The knowledge gave 
me confidence. My hands had 
almost stopped trembling, when a 
hysterical girl in a Freshman cap 
stumbled out of the seething mob, 
grabbed my shirt front and 
screamed "Sociology 172! Soci- 
ology 172!" in my face. Then she 
threw her arms about my neck 
and beat her head against my 
chest. (It was then that the 
twitch in my left eye began. The 
doctors told me yesterday that 
my left eye will twitch per- 
manently.) 

I managed to disentangle her, 
and ran, panting and terrified, 
into the crowd. "Nasty twitch 
you've got there," someone said, 
but before he had finished a 
woman's shrill voice screamed, 
"Lithuanian 101 is closed! 
Closed! Ha ha ha ha ha ha.' " 
Someone muttered "Damn" and 
threw a chair at her. I fled. 

When I finally located the 
table at which my adviser alleg- 
edly sat, he was "out for coffee." 



Editorial Policy 



Editorials aren't the most widely read features of a stu- 
dent paper, but they do play a vital part in informing the 
student body as well as shedding light on certain college 
problems. 

This year as in past years, the Editorials will be based on 
facts and will be the opinions of either the editor or her staff 
members. They might not correspond to those ideas held by 
some students, but those wishing to disagree are WELCOME 
to expi'ess themselves in letters to the Editor. 

This newspaper's primary purpose is to serve the student 
body and to provide a comprehensive report of student and 
faculty activities as well as adequate coverage of campus 
news. The Sauce is strictly a NEWSpaper for the students of 
Northwestern State College and shall remain as such through- 
out the school year. 

We are always open to constructive criticism and sug- 
gestions for the betterment of the Current Sauce. 

Letters to the Editor will be printed if signed by the 
author. However, if the writer so desires, his name may be 
deleted, but the deletion will depend on content and will not 
be granted automatically. 

The Current Sauce reserves the right to reject any letter 
because of content or character. 



A half-hour later I heard some- 
one say that they had seen him 
moments ago drunkenly frugging 
in the student center, so I forged 
his name to my trial schedule 
card and set out, twitching fran- 
tically, to obtain class cards, 
whatever they were. I got in the 
line that seemed to contain the 
most Freshmen, and when I got 
close enough to read the sign, it 
said CONFLICTS. I caught my- 
self laughing rather insanely. 
"Are you in Conflicts 101?" the 
girl behind me asked, a touch of 
desperation in her voice. 

At the P.E. table some hulk of 
a woman yelled "8 MWF Sec 69, 
1:30-2:45 TT Sec. 731, or 12 TTS 
under Marx?!" "Yes!" I twitched 
back impulsively. 

Sixty-Three Hours 

It took me six hours to get 
every little square on my trial 
schedule card filled, but when I 
finally made it back to my ad- 
visor's table, I triumphantly 
flung the spoils of my battle be- 
fore him. He looked at my trial 
schedule with rather bloodshot 
eyes and said "Sixty-three hours 
is quite a load for a Freshman 
isn't it, Ruginald?" 

"That all depends, sir," I 
wheezed, "on what is an hour." 

"Ruginald, Ruginald," he ad- 
monished gently, and then 
passed out. He was crocked. 

The girl at the dean's table 
told me I would have to take 
back some of the class cards I 
had fought for so valiantly. It 
was a supreme effort not to 
strangle her. Of course I didn't 
take them back. I quietly burned 
them in a corner, so that no one 
else could get at them. (I carry 
the ashes with me now in a little 
mother-of-pearl pillbox tucked 
away in the secret compartment 
of my billfold. Sometimes I take 
them out at night and twitch at 
them.) 

On the other side of the coli- 
seum they took all my money I 
laughed and laughed. 

At Last 

Then they took my picture. On 
my ID I am wearing a sheepish 
grin. I wondered why, at first. 
Then I figured it out. It was a 
grin of pride. I was exhausted, 
bruised, broke, and registered! 
And very proud — for having sur- 
vived. 



This Time Tomorrow 



Friday, September 22 

Panhellenic Invitation Pick-up, SU 316, 

8:00 a.m.-3:00. 
Play Rehersal, Little Theatre, 8:00 a.m.- 

10:30 p.m. 
Last day to register. 

Sorority Preferential Teas, Sorority 
Houses, 6:00-8:15 p.m. 

Saturday, September 23 

Panhellenic-S i g n i n g of Preferential 
Blanks, SU 320, 7:00-8:00 a.m. 

Football Game— NSC vs La. College, 
Wildcat Stadium, Pineville, 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday, September 24 

Pick up Sorority Bids, DOW's Office, SU 
306 

The Concert Hour, Radio Station KNOC, 
1:00 p.m. 

Monday, September 25 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, 6 p.m. 
ABA Workshop, SU 316, 2-6 p.m. 
ABA Meeting, SU 316, 6-7:30 p.m. 
Phi Mu Rep., SU 314, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



Tuesday, September 26 

SLTA Reception, Varnado Drawing 

Room, 3:30-5:30 p.m. 
Psychology 101 Class, Dr. Moody, FA 

Auditorium, 1:30-2:45 p.m. 
Art 103, Hancey, Little Theatre, 10-11 

a.m. 

Phi Mu Rep., SU 314, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Potpourri Pictures, SU 242, 9 a.m.-4:30 
p.m. 

Wednesday, September 27 

Mitch Ryder Show, Coliseum, 8 p.m. 

Phi Mu Rep., SU 314, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Potpourri Pictures, SU 242, 9 a.m.-4:30 
p.m. 

Thursday, September 28 

Alpha Lambda Delta Meeting, SU 320, 
6 p.m. 

SLTA Meeting, WE Auditorium, 6:45 p.m. 
Psychology 101 Class, Dr. Moody, FA 

Auditorium, 1:30-2:45 p.m. 
Delta Zeta Buffet Supper, DZ House, 

6:30 p.m. 

Potpourri Pictures, SU 232, 9 a.m.-4:30 
p.m. 




When I was a Freshman, I spoke, acted and stood in lines . . . . 
Now that I am an upperclassman, I do the same thing! 



Minutes of SGA 



SGA Minutes 
September 18/ 1967 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
first regular meeting to order. The 
minutes were read and approved. Roll 
called. Absent were Lowe, Kirk, Coop- 
er, and Brown. 

Henry Burns reported on the AMS. 
Men students will elect floor represen- 
tatives at the dormitories Thursday 
night. Maxwell suggested sheets be run 
off and given to each boy to inform 
him of tne duties and responsibilities 
of the office. 

Fowler reported that approximately 
$7,500 worth of Entertainment tickets 
nave already been sold this fail. He 
thanked the Entertainment committee 
for their tun and effort. 

The supper honoring the SGA mem- 
bers will be Thursday night, 6:00 p.m. 
in room 269 of the Student Union. 

Maxwell asked tnat the SUSGA com- 
mittee meet after the meeting. Also, 
the election board committee will meet 
to set tne Fresnrnen election date. 

A plan for a NSC college wide song 
fest was presented by Miss Ellen 
McPherson. s>he discussed tne details 
of the plan with the members of the 
SGA. Ferrera said tnat a good time lur 
the song fest wouid be Friday night, 
December 1. 

Butler moved that we look into the 
song fest on Dec. 1, 1967, and appoint 
a committee to do so. Fowler seconded. 
Gray caiied for question. Motion passed. 

Maxwell moved that we amend the 
motion to read that we have a song 
fest on Dec. 1, 1967. Seconded by Gray. 
Question called by Townsend. Motion 
carried. 

Gray moved that the President of 
SGA appoint a committee to get infor- 
mation concerning a juke box being 
placed in the student Union. Maxweli 
seconded. Question called by Fowler. 
Motion passed. President Newbury ap- 
pointed Gray as chairman of the com- 
mittee and the members to be the 
Sophomore ciass officers. 

Mr. Johnson of the Josten Ring Co. 
presented tne sketch of the new NSC 
ring featuring the double dates. Mr. 
Johnson asked the group their ideas on 
the dinner ring for giris. Mr. Johnson 
will bring a sKetch of this ring back 
to the AWS for approval. The group 
felt it would be profitable to offer this 
ring 10 the giris along with the regular 
miniature senior ring. 

Maxwell moved we adopt the design 
presented to the SGA as the official 
NSC senior ring. Seconded by Butler. 



Potpourri Picture 
Remake Date Set 

Yearbook pictures for all late 
registrants and everyone else 
who failed to have their pictures 
taken during registration will be 
taken Thursday, September 28, 
1967, in Room 242 of the Student 
Union from 9-12 a.m. and from 
12:30-4:30 p.m. 

This will be your last opportu- 
nity to have your picture taken 
for this year's "Potpourri". Every 
effort is being made to see that 
this year's Potpourri contains a 
true representation of the total 
enrollment at NSC 

Gowns will be provided for all 
seniors. Men should wear ties and 
dark jackets. 



Burns called for question. Motion 
carried. 

The idea of insurance being made 
compusory for all NSC students was 
brought up by Maxweli. He moved that 
Newbury appoint a committee to look 
further into the situation. Landry sec- 
onded. Fowler called for question. Mo- 
tion passed. 

Dean Fulton announced that Mr. 
Wright had been instructed to obtain 
additional seats in the stadium by the 
next home game, it was felt that the 
confusion at he game in seating was 
due to the changing of the student 
seats from the South end to the North 
end. 

The problem of lack of school spirit 
at the game was discussed. (School 
spirit meaning yelling at the game.) It 
was decided that if the students and 
organizations were seated around the 
band, that much of the problem would 
be eliminated. 

Maxwell moved that a committee be 
appointed to go before the Athletic 
Council to represent the SGA. Butler 
seconded. Fowler called for question. 
Motion carried. Pres. Newbury- ap- 
pointed Duan Ferrera as the represen- 
tative to the council. 

Maxwell again explained the screen- 
ing of cheerleaders be a qualified 
group rather than electing them by 
popular student vote. 

Wicks said that they should be 
screened and then those students pass- 
ing the committee by candidates for 
student election. Butler moved that 
Maxwell draw up an amendment to the 
constitution concerning cheerleader 
elections. Gray seconded. Townsend 
called for question. Motion carried. 

Ferrera mentioned the problem of 
new curtains in the dormitory for 
watching television. It was decided that 
possibly the AMS could handle the situ- 
ation. AMS dues could be used for 
buying curtains where needed. 

Gray moved the meeting adjourn. 
Seconded by Landry. Fowler called for 
question. Motion passed. Meeting ad- 
journed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 

urrpnf S a "Ce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 

Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: Frances Toler, Mary Ann 
Anderson, Pat Wegmann, Susie Chan- 
cey, Danny Boutwell, Gail Dooley, Ray 
King, Gidget Maxwell, Jack Montgom- 
ery, Shirley Rutledge, Alton Sanders, 
Ray Stephens, Ed Thompson, Thomas 
Turner and Virginia Ann Wooten. 

Eo«torials reflect only the opinions of 
memuers of the staff. They do ncl re- 
flect the opinions of the ctudent body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Friday, September 22, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Sixty-Two 
Join NSC 

Sixty-two faculty members 
have been added to the college 
teaching staff for the fall sem- 
ester of 1967 as a result of recent 
appointments by College presi- 
dent Arnold Kilpatrick. 

There are 29 new teachers in 
the School of Arts and Sciences; 
nine in the School of Business; 
23 in the School of Education; 
six in the School of Nursing; 
and one in Counseling and 
Testing. 

Those new teachers joining 
the present faculty in the School 
of Arts and Sciences are Mrs. 
Margaret Adkins, music; Donald 
J. Alexandra, art; Dr. Edward 
Arceneaux, history; Richard G. 
Brown, social sciences; Jack L. 
Carter, English; Dr. Eugene J. 
Clothiaux, professor and head, 
department of physics; Selman 
C. Cooke, anthropology; J. 
Wayne Crowder, music; Rene De 
Hon, geology; Mrs. Mary Doherty, 
Engliish; Dr. Paul Donaldson, as- 
sociate professor and head of the 
department of Microbiology; and 
Captain Clifford J. Eby, military 
science. 

, Dan D. Gardner, government; 
Dr. William B. Knipmeyer, pro- 
fesser and head, department of 
social sciences; Mrs. Margaret 
Land, mathematics; John R. Le- 
Blanc, Jr., music; Captain Paul 
R. Lister, military science; Sgt. 
Bert L. McLaughlin, military 
science; Betty K. Miller, math- 
ematics; Dr. Walter L. Mosley, 
associate professor and head, 
department of languages; Robert 
E. Noble, biology; Marcus E 
Pettaway, speech; John R. Raush, 
music and assistant director of 
bands; Dick T. Stalling, biology; 
Mrs. Cheri Webster, mathematics; 
Jerry Wendt, sociology; Oren 
Whitehead, biology; and Charles 
H. Wickersham, psychology. 

Added to the School of Busi- 
ness faculty were Dr. Charles W. 
Becker, industrial education; 
Roger W. Best, assistant profes- 
sor and acting head, department 
of business administration; Wil- 
liam L. Call, accounting and 
economics; Tommy G. Johnson, 
buisness education and office 
adminsitration; Kenneth Knotts, 
economics; Donald S. Slacum, 
economics and business adminis- 
tration; Charles D. Van Eaton, 
economics; Mrs. Sloise Watkins, 
home economics; and Ronald L. 
Weir, business administration. 

New additions in the School of 
Education for the fall are Dr. 
Bennie G. Barron, elementary 
education; Tillie Cookston, ele- 
mentary education; Mrs. Mar- 
garet Craig, special education; 
Mrs. Joan Cronan, health and P. 



Teachers 
Faculty 

E.; Dr. William A. Davis, associ- 
ate professor and head, depart- 
ment of student teaching; Donita 
Gothard, educational psychology 
and guidance; and Donald Guc- 
ker, clinical psychologist and 
special education. 

Elwood Henry, special educa- 
tion; Matthew J. Keppinger, ele- 
mentary education; Mrs. Shirley 
Lucius, special education; Ed- 
ward E. Matis, director of speech 
pathology; Mrs. Dorothy D. Mil- 
ler, special education; Joe M. 
Hoyt J. Reed, secondary educa- 
tion and associate director of 
school planning laboratory; Carol 
Marie Schmidt, hearing and spe- 
ech consultant; James Simmons, 
health and P.E. and Armando 
Vega, health and P.E. and gymn- 
astic coach. 

In the School of Nursing the 
following have been added to the 
staff: Clarissa Carter, instructor 
and librarian, Shreveport; Clara 
Gates, medical surgical nursing, 
Shreveport; Mrs. Beth Hayes nur- 
sing of children, Shreveport; Mrs. 
Louise McFadden, medical sur- 
gical nursing, Baton Rouge and 
Mrs. Freida Rosenwasser, mater- 
nity nursing, Shreveport. 

Donald L. Dubois joins the 
counseling and testing center as 
Assistant Professor of Reading. 

AWS Style Show, 
Program Welcome 
Freshmen Coeds 

Freshmen women students 
were welcomed to the campus 
last Monday night in a special 
assembly sponsored by the cam- 
pus's Associated Women Stuld- 
ent's organization. 

Officers of the AWS, Dean of 
Women, Lucile Hendrick, Assis- 
tant Dean of Women, Mrs Jerry 
Pierce and Miss Alice Lee Jarvis 
of the Physical Education De- 
partment were on hand to greet 
the new NSC women students. 

Highlights of the assembly was 
a fashion show, narrated by Pam 
Hankins, showiing the freshmen 
girls the do's and don'ts of cam- 
pus attire. 

Also on the program was a 
skit presented by the AWS ex- 
ecutive officers and an address 
by the Dean of Women. Dean 
Hendrick challenged each fresh- 
man woman to "grow in spirit, 
education and in character and 
you will feel a part of Northwes- 
tern." 




CIRCLE K PRESIDENT Wayne Branton presents NSC President 
Arnold Kilpatrick with a $1,000 check for the college's athletic scholar- 
ship foundation fund. The local chapter of Circle K, a national service 
organization, raised the $1,000 sum from proceeds earned while man- 
ning concession stands in the coliseum last year. 



SGA Ticket Sale Ends Wednesday 

Student entnertainment book- The booklets, costing $3.50, 

lets for the four big name talent are good for the Mitch Ryder 

performances this fall are now on show, the Platters performance, 

sale in the Student Union at the Simon and Garfunkel and the 

Information Desk. Serendipity Singers. 



Welcome Back NSC Students 



Our Cosmetic Line 



WOMEN 

Max Factor 

Tussy 

Lanvin 

Corday 

Clairol 



MEN 

Max Factor 
Lanvin 
Jade East 
Old Spice 
Yardley 



McClung Drug Company 



600 Front Street 



Phone 352-2461 



We Deliver To All Dorms 



Faculty Briefs 

Jerry Arledge, former North 
Caddo High coach, has been 
named NSC football graduate 
assistant, according to Head 
Coach Glen Gossett. 

A graduate of La. Tech, he won 
three letters as a guard and line- 
backer. 

He is working toward a mas- 
ter's degree in health and phys- 
ical education. 



Swingline 



Test yourself... 
What do you see in the ink blots? 



[1] A cockfight? 
A moth? 
A moth-eaten 
cockfight? 



[2] Giraffes in high foliage? 
Scooters in a head-on 
collision? 
TOT Staplers? 
ffOT Staplers!? What in... > 

This is a 

Swingline 

Tot Stapler 






(including 1000 staples) 
Larger size CUB Desk 
Stapler only^gg 

Unconditionally guaranteed. 
At any stationery, variety, or book store. 

cz* * A ® 

4 _>#Ctt^2^£**££L INC. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. 11101 

TloA* :sja|deis XOX 'AjisjaApe ijnoo noA" 
tSaipiifOD sjajooog -sauesJOApe ?suie3e 
©ATjjs'noA* :s3jjeji3 eq'x 'Z jozitps 'noA* 
ojq 'A*og :m3ij3po3 uaiea-ijjoui y 'aAis 
•sojSaj 9j,noA" :i]joui y *OAissaj33e aj ( noA* 
IjqSipfDOD b eas no.: jj. *| :S2I3MSNV 



DAILY SPECIALS 



SPECIALS 



NIGHT SPECIALS 



Waddle N Grill 
& Drive In 

Phone 352-4949 
Highway One South 



Broadmoor Restaurant 

10% discount for all college students 
Phone 352-6120 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 



DAILY SPECIALS 



Wee Waddle N 



Phone 352-8246 
702 College Avenue 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 22, 1967 



KA To Host Victory 
Dance in Alexandria 



Tradition-Crusted Caldwell Has New Face 



Kappa Alpha's local chapter, 
Gamma Psi, is sponsoring a Vic- 
tory Dance following tomorrow 
night's NSC vs La. College foot- 
ball game in Alexandria. 

The dance, to be held at the 
Alexandria Convention Hall, will 
feature music by the famed Rock 
Foundation. Tickets, $2.50 each, 
can be purchased from any fra- 
ternity member or pledge. 

Outstanding Chapter 
NSC's local KA chapter won a 
trophy for scholarship during the 
recent KA convention in Atlanta, 
Ga. 

The trophy went to the local 
group for having the highest per- 
centage difference in the overall 
men's grade average and the fra- 
ternity grade average. Northwes- 
tern's KA chapter won the trophy 
in competition with 87 other col- 
lege and university chapters. 

Pledges 

With the start of a new school 
year, Kappa Alpha has inducted 
26 new pledges into the fratern- 
ity. Taking the KA pledge were 
Dudley Fulton, Jr. David Shaw, 
Richard Yancy, Tim Butler, Joe 
Laudun, Stephen Maxwell, Char- 
les Gentz, Bill Miles, Ralph De- 
Kemper, Eugene Vogt, Mike 
Poole, Steve Lenart, Marvin Sch- 
wartzenburg, Al Fontenot, Doug 
Cook, Max Reed, Ronald Davis, 
John Gray, Andy Hargis, Gere 



ASS Dorms Plan 
Fall Fire Drills 
Says Dean Fulton 

Students residing on North- 
western's campus can now expect 
to have at least one fire drill 
each semester. 

The dorms will not participate 
collectively, but each will be as- 
signed a specific time for the 
fire drills. 

The drills have been held at 
various intervals in previous 
years, but Dean Fulton expects 
to hold them more regularly than 
in the past. 

According to Dean Fulton, the 
drills are chiefly a safety mea- 
sure. He believes that if the stu- 
dents have practiced vacating 
the buildings in an orderly man- 
ner, much of the danger incur- 
red by panic will be avoided in 
the event of a fire. 



Thomas, James Whitten, Bubba 
Adkins, Timmy Chopin, Frankie 
Elder, Joe McKey and Doug Tar- 
ver. 



Northwestern's oldest class- 
room building has been reopened 
this fall after a year of complete 
renovation. 

Caldwell Hall was built in 
1906. It was once used for the col- 
lege administrative offices un- 
til the erection of the new Admin- 



ROTC Drills Begin Under 
New Student Commanders 



With initial enrollment of 136 
freshmen reporting for duty at 
the drill field last Wednesday, 
the new cadet battalion staff, 
composed of last year's juniors, 
looks forward to another suc- 
cessful year for the Northwestern 
State College ROTC department. 

The battalion staff has another 
full year of commanding a total 
of over 225 cadets enrolled at 
the start of the school year. 

Heading the staff this year is 
Cadet Colonel Joe Cosumano, 
for the first time in the history 
of the NSC cadet corps, a bat- 
talion commander will have two 
deputy commanders, Lt. Colonels 
Robert Tallmadge and Paul Kel- 
ly. 

Assisting the commanders this 
year are S-l, Capt. Tommy Liv- 
ingston; S-2, Capt. Bill Burris; S-3, 
Major Bill Contrell; and S-4, Capt. 
Donald Cates. 

The company commanders for 
this year are Captains Carl 
Hedleston, A Co.; Bob Kell, A 
Co.; Gerald Krause, B Co.; and 
Paul Fritz, C Co. 

Lt. Col Paul Kelly, commander 

Canterbury Club 
Picnic Set For 
Sunday Afternoon 

Trinity Episcopal Church will 
welcome all Episcopal college stu- 
dents to Natchitoches with a pic- 
nic Sunday following the church's 
10:30 a.m. service. 

Transportation will be pro- 
vided to the picnic site, the resi- 
dence of Dr. Caesar B. Moody at 
Sudbury Park. 

All planning on attending the 
picnic are asked to attend church 
dressed for the picnic. Blue jeans 
and other comfortable clothes 
are in order, according to the 
Rev. Robert Luckett, NSC Episco- 
palian Chaplain. 

Those wanting further infor- 
mation on the picnic and those 
planning on attending should call 
the Canterbury Club at 352-8096. 



of the Black Knights, expects to 
have a total of 35 drill team 
members preparing for the up- 
coming meets this semester. 

Commanding the entire NSC 
ROTC program is Lt. Col. Charles 
Avery, who officially assumed 
the duties as professor of Mili- 
tary Science here in June. . Lt. 
Col. Avery replaces Col. Robert 
Gildersleeve, who was trans- 
ferred to Washington, D. C. 



Barron Named 
To Head Local 
Demeter Club 

Donald Baron was elected pres- 
ident of the NSC Demeter agri- 
culture chapter at the organiza- 
tion's first meeting for the fall 
semester Monday night. 

Other officers named for the 
1967-68 school year were Dale 
Behan, vice-president; Loyd Cobb, 
secretary; Harold Salard, treas- 
urer; Bill Fowler, reporter; Billy 
Franklin, parliamentarian; and 
Don Dean, sergeant-at-arms. 

Following the election of of- 
ficers, committees were appoint- 
ed to operate concession stands 
at the next home football game.\ 
Demeter, operating jointly with 
the Rodeo Club, mans the con- 
cession stands. 

The group also discussed the 
possibility of inviting the States- 
men Quartet to the campus and 
planned a barbecue for the near 
future. 

Any agricultural student in- 
terested in Demeter may contact 
any faculty advisor or Demeter 
club officers for further informa- 
tion on the organization. 

DEAN FULTON, 

WHY ISN'T THE COLLEGE 
SENDING A BUS LOAD OF 
STUDENTS TO THE NSC-LA. 
COLLEGE FOOTBALL GAME 
TOMORROW NIGHT???? 




WEE WADDLE N AND 
PANCAKE HOUSE 

Now serving 6 various types of Pancakes 
COMING SOON! Muffy Sandwiches 
Self-Service and reduced prices 
Deliveries from 5-10 p.m. Phone 352-8246 
702 College Avenue 



istration building. For over 60 
years, it has served as a class- 
room and faculty office building. 

Just last year, complete remod- 
ling was started after classrooms 
and offices were emptied. 

Among many new features of 
Caldwell are central air condi- 
tioning and heating, a new flour- 
escent lighting system, new metal 
stairwells with terrazzo steps, and 
new windows. 

Also included in the renova- 
tion, totaled at approximately 
$380,000, are suspended acoustical 
ceilings throughout the building, 
and new floors and walls. Colorful 
vinyl fabric has also been placed 



on most of the walls from the 
floor to four feet up the wall. 

In addition to renovating the 
inside of the structure, workers 
have given the exterior a face- 
lifting with trim being repainted 
and metal doors being installed 
at all entrances. 

The brick building houses 16 
classes this fall, and many faculty 
members in the School of Arts 
and Sciences have moved into 
Caldwell offices. 

President Arnold R. Kilpatrick 
said that the first floor of Cald- 
well will be completed later this 
fall. 



BLOSSOM 
FLOWER 

SHOP 

We specialize in NSC Football Mums and are now 
selling unique NSC Football Shoulder Pennants. 



Fast Delivery 
917 Washington Street 



Phone 352-6677 



Now- 
one more thing 
not to 

worry about 

Neat discreet bags 
for pad disposal 
come FREE in each 
pretty new box of 
Scott Confidets.. 




Friday, September 22, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 




Coach Gossett 
Goes On TV With 
"Demon Show 



BARRY FRESH, junior fullback from East Jefferson in New Orleans, 
is a starter in the tough Demon backfield. Not exceptionally big at 5-7, 
185, as fullbacks go, Fresh compensates for it with speed and sheer 
strength. 

Additional Buildings 
Planned for Campus 



Northwestern, already accomo- 
dating a record number of stu- 
dents, is preparing for future en- 
rollment hikes with a massive 
program of physical expansion. 

Already taking shape and ex- 
pected to be complete in January 
is the huge Arts and Sciences 
Classroom Building on the west 
side of the campus. The building 
will provide more than 200 rooms 
for offices and classes. More than 
2,500 students will be able to use 
the $3.2 million building at one 
time. 

The Arts and Sciences building 
is going up next to the $1.5 mil- 
lion Student Union, which was 
completed last year. Both are 
near the new dormitory-dining 
hall complex which stands on the 
western edge of the 916-acre 
campus. 

Recently renovated was Cald- 
well Hall, the oldest classroom 
building on the campus. Built in 
1906, the building once housed 
the college's administrative offi- 
ces but now serves as a classroom 



and faculty office building. The 
three-story building has been 
completely remodeled through- 
out. 

Northwestern president Dr. 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick has spear- 
headed a drive for new physical 
facilities, and his efforts have re- 
sulted in more than $5 million in 
future expansion. Most of the 
buildings which will be con- 
structed in the next two years are 
still on the drawing boards. 

Kilpatrick and Dean of the Col- 
lege Dr. Charles Thomas are es- 
pecially proud of plans for a new 
$2 million teacher-education cen- 
ter at the college. Work should 
begin on the structure in early 
1968. The building will be four 
round structures under one roof, 
the only one of its kind in the 
state. 

Also in the planning stages are 
a $1.2 million women's physical 
education plant, a $1.7 million 
biological sciences building and 
a $100,000 agricultural accessory 



Glenn Gossett, NSC head foot- 
ball coach, is appearing on a 
weekly television show this fall 
on KTBS, Channel 3 in Shreve- 
port. 

The Glenn Gossett Show began 
Monday night and is aired 
each Monday for 10 weeks at 
10:30 p.m. The show is in color. 

Commentator for the show is 
Jerry Pierce, director of infor- 
mational services at Northwest- 
ern. 

Filmed highlights of North- 
western's games are shown 
each week with Gossett explain- 
ing the action. 

Interviews are conducted 
with players who were outstand- 
ing in the games, and upcoming 
opponents are discussed. 

This is the first time in his- 
tory that a Gulf States Confer- 
ence school has had a weekly 
television show in the Shreve- 
port area. 

USAF Recruiter 
To See Seniors 

Air Force Captain Frank M. 
Benton, officer selection spe- 
cialist, will be on campus Thurs- 
day to interview interested sen- 
ior men and women for a possible 
career in the Air Force. 

Capt. Benton will be in the 
main lobby of the Student Un- 
ion all day Thursday to talk with 
young men and women in their 
senior year about an Air Force 
career. 

Anyone wanting further infor- 
mation on the Air Force should 
contact Capt. Benton Thursday, 
or the regular Air Force re- 
cruiting officer who visits the 
NSC campus every Thursday 
morning at the Student Union. 



building. 

Work is progressing rapidly on 
a $100,000 Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion Speech and Hearing Center, 
which will be an addition to Bul- 
lard Hall in the center of the 
sprawling campus. The building 
will be completed in time for use 
in the spring semester. 

Demons 
Number 7 
In the Nation 

(A.P.) 



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Also Shop Gibson's Pharmacy 
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Welcome Back NSC Student 

Our SPECIALS for this week: 

Composition Books 4 for $1.00 

Suave Hair Spray 2 for $1.00 

Gillette Foamy 2 for $1.00 

UNITED DOLLAR STORE 

Located in Broadmoor Shopping Center 

We cash student checks 




Welcome College Students 

Come by the studio and have your beauty struck. 

Look over the prices we have arranged for you. 

8x10 Portraits 7.00 

5x7 Portraits 4.75 

Wallets by the handfull 5.00 

And remember we do not have a sitting charge. 

Uhrbach Studio 



Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Phone 352-556 



BULLETIN! 



THE BOOK STORE IS NOW FEATURING 
THE ONE BOOK YOU'LL USE FOR 
ALL COURSES! 

Save yourself from crippling errors in reports and , 
theme writing. Save time and avoid the tedium of] 
correcting mistakes. 

Equip yourself now with a permanent lifesaver by, 
buying the one desk dictionary that won't let yott j 
down. It's Webster's Seventh New Collegiate — re») 
quired or recommended by your English department. 

This is the only Webster with the guidance you need 
,in spelling and punctuation. It's the latest. It in* 
eludes 20,000 new words and new meanings. 

Owning your own copy is much easier and avoids the 
hazards of guessing. So pick up this new dictionary 
now at the bookstore for just $6.75 indexed. It will 
still be a lifesaver ten years from now. 

GET YOUR OWN COPY TODAY. 

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You'll recognize it by the bright red jacket. 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday. September 22, 1967 



From. Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 

Evolution of a Sports Editor 

It has been eulogistically stated that "Old Current Sauce 

sports editors never die, but come back to take the place of 
others who have faded away," (apropos S. Gunn) and so it is 
again "From Down Under" was somewhat obscurely borne 
by me in January, 1967. Under my shaky hand it survived 
until early May when I was forced to resign. It was then pass- 
ed to Steve Gunn, whom I had replaced after he had resigned. 
However he could only accept the position in an interim ca- 
pacity, and now I have returned anew, armed with new and 
spectacular ideas from the dark recesses of my fervent imag- 
ination. 

So then, let us wade into the sporting news at hand. 
Lift-Off Time Again 

The beginning of the fall semester is synonymous with 
the start of another football season. Collegiate football has 
surpassed professional baseball in popularity and now is 
second only to professional football in spectator appeal. On 
the local front NSC students and Demon supporters every- 
where have much to yell about. 

Coming off an unbeaten, untied season in 1966, North- 
western again has all of the horses and then some. The losses 
of Al Dodd, Dick Reding, Ross Guinn, and Carroll Long were 
big, but Coach Glenn Gossett has a host of lettermen and 
squadmen ready to fill the gaps. 

Evidence of this is the almost passive manner in which 
the Demons soundly thrashed a game, but out-manned, out- 
classed Hanover Panther team 49-0. Offensive depth seems 
endless as inumerable backs shuttled in and out of the con- 
test all night long. Defensive depth seems to be at more of a 
premium however. Nevertheless the stop-em gang can stay 
with anybody as there are many returnees from last year's 
group. 

Offensively, Northwestern will be able to score on any- 
body, barring key injuries. Dual quarterbacks Don Guidry 
and Deacon Lewis can run and throw with the best in college 
football. With outstanding running backs such as Barry Fresh, 
Vic Nyvall, Kenny Callens and Don Mayfield rolling over, 
under, around and through opposing defenses the backfield 
should produce. All of these backs are quick and powerful, 
though not particularly big. 

The receiving department is equally blessed with out- 
standing ends Steve Gaspard, Louis Richard, Russ Gielow and 
Shelly Dickie. This collection of pass-grabbers should give 
quarterbacks Lewis and Guidry all sorts of targets to throw to. 

The Demons must work on their pass defense which was 
a little spotty at times. Defensive backs David Smith, Dick 
Concilio, Sammy Clifton, John Boogaerts and newcomer Dave 
Collingsworth need to work a little more on the cohesion 
needed in the defensive secondary. 

Northwestern has to be regarded by all as the team to 
beat for the Gulf States Conference title in 1967. Last year, 
NSC was ranked number one in the small college polls for a 
while but finished fourth eventually in the Associated Press, 
United Press International, and the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics polls after declining an invitation to 
a four team play-off and the Pecan bowl. 

GSC A-GO-GO 

The Gulf States Conference, regarded by many as the 
best small college conference in the country, is considerably 
improved Most noteworthy were the showings of La. Tech, 
who whacked away at usually tough Delta State 34-7, while 
the Northeast Indians romped 33-0 at the expense of Hender- 
son State. _ 

Resurgent La. College How Good? 

Louisiana College football nearly became a thing of the 
past after the 1966 season during which they scored only 
three points. Administrators wanted to eliminate the program 
because of financial problems, not to mention bad seasons 
getting worse each year, and the tremendous recruiting prob- 
lems. But football was given one more chance, and the Wild- 
Cats made a fine stand against a supposedly tough USL crew, 
28-14 after trailing only 8-7 through three quarters. A 20- 
pointCajun explosion at this point sealed La. College's doom. 
Games This Week 

Northwestern 34, La. College 10 (Demons have too much.) 
S. F. Austin 14, Northeast 10 (Should be close either way.) 
McNeese 24, Pensacola 13 (Cowboys sink the Navy.) Lamar 
Tech 20, Southwestern 13 (Bulldogs drop second straight.) 
Southern Mississippi 36, Southeastern 14 (Lions get away with 
two TD tosses but little else.) La Tech — off. 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 





HALFBACK VICTOR NYVALL will see plenty of action tomorrow 
night when the Demons travel to Pineville to met La. College. The 
sophomore back scored two touchdowns against Hanover last Saturday. 

Hanover Falls 49-0 
In Season Opener 



Baseball Team 
Holds Workouts 

Sports enthusiasts who happen 
to wander past the baseball dia- 
mond during the next month may 
be surprised to discover the base- 
ball team engaged in daily after- 
noon workouts. 

To the average passer-by, this 
may seem quite odd, but to the 
members of the baseball squad 
this is not an unusual occurrence 
since they are presently occupied 
with their fall practice which be- 
gan Monday 

Practice during the next few 
weeks will enable Head Coach 
Jack Clayton and his assistants 
to find replacements for the jobs 
left open by graduation. 

The fall drills will be aimed at 
developing fundamental and vari- 
ous other elements of the game, 
with special stress on the hitting 
and fielding departments. 

All practices will be attended 
by both returning lettermen and 
squadmen, and also by freshmen 
and other prospective candidates 
who hope for a berth on the team 
next spring. 

Clayton noted that the fall 
practice will continue for four 
weeks if weather permits, and 
should give him and his assis- 
tants an opportunity to evaluate 
the available personnel and thus 
save time when the actual prac- 
tice confronts them in the spring. 



By Bobby Ardoin 

Head coach Glenn Gossett 
gained an impressive victory in 
his debut Saturday night as the 
Demons rolled over hapless Han- 
over College 49-0 in a contest 
played before a partisan, stand- 
ing-room-only crowd in Demon 
Stadium. 

The triumph over the Panthers 
was the 11th straight win for the 
Demons over a three year span, 
and also marked the ninth con- 
secutive opening game win for 
the Purple and White. 

Although figuring to stick 
mainly to a hard-nosed ball con- 
trol offense, the Demons revers- 
ed their game plan and wound 
up scoring four of their six 
touchdowns via the air route. 

The quarterbacking duo of Don 
Guidry and Malcolm Lewis be- 
gan where they left off last sea- 
son as their deadly aerials rid- 
dled the leaky Hanover pass de- 
fense for 176 yards. 

Guidry completed three of four 
passes for one touchdown and 
105 yards, while Lewis connected 
on four of six attempts for 71 
markers. Freshmen signal callers 
Mike Pool and John McClendon 
entered the game in its final 



stages and threw for a total of 
24 yards and one touchdown. 

Victor Nyvall playing in his 
first reular season game in a 
Demon uniform was the game's 
leading rusher racking up 63 
yards in six carries. The sopho- 
more running back from Kilgore, 
Tex. also added two touchdown 
jaunts of 43 and 78 yards 

Nyvall was also th,e leading 
pass receiver with 105 yards and 
three receptions for a 35 yard 
average. Next in the receiving 
department was Benny Richard 
of Opelousas who snagged three 
aerials for 56 yards and one 
touchdown. 

Jumping off to an early lead, 
the Demons struck paydirt on 
their second; play from scrim- 
mage when halfback Kenny Cal- 
lens bucked the Hanover line at 
left tackle, then burst into the 
open secondary in a scoring play 
that carried 40 yards. The try for 
extra point was wide, and the 
Demons led 6-0. 

Midway through the second 
period the Demons added ano- 
ther three points to their long 
list of scoring plays for the night. 
After marchiing from their own 
32, the Demon drive was halted 
on the Hanover 35 by the sudden- 
(See Hanover Falls, Page 7) 



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Friday. September 22, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Hanover Falls 49-0 



(Continued from page 6) 
ly tough Panther defense. On 
fourth down, Malcolm Lewis en- 
tered the game and booted a 
kick through the uprights for a 
9-0 lead. 

The Demons annexed another 
seven points in the fading min- 
utes of the first half after taking 
over on downs at thir own 48 
yard line. 

On the first play, Lewis un- 
corked a 23 yard aerial comple- 
tion to Richard for a first down 
on the Hanover 17. Fullback Don 
Mayfield edged through the line 
for two additional yards on the 
next play. On the following play 
Lewis sprinted to his left and 
flipped a scoring pass to Richard, 
all alone in the end zone. 

In the third period, the De- 
mons gathered the opening kick- 
off and marched 60 yards on the 
first series of plays for their 
third tally of the night. After 
testing the Hanover line with 



three consecutive running plays, 
quarterback Gufdry flipped a 
pithchout to halfback Nyvall who 
slid of tackle for a 43 yard score. 
Lewis booted the PAT directly 
through the goal posts and the 
Demons led Hanover at this 
point 22-0. 

quarter came on a 18 yard Lewis 
pass to Jerry Mott, and on a 
Guidry completion to Nyvall for 
78 yards 

Appearances by the freshmen 
and sophomre members fo the 
squad dominated the fourth quar- 
ter scoring records for the De- 
mons. Left-han,ded quarterback 
Mike Pool loted an eight yard 
scoring pass to tight end Russ 
Gielow for a touchdown, and 
freshman halfback George Green 
ran around left end for the other. 

Tomorrow night the Demons 
travel to Pineville to face Louisi- 
ana College at 7:30 at Wildcat 
Stadium. 



Men's Intramural Hebert ls BSU Pre *y 

Season To Begin BSU Reveals Fall Activities 



Tuesday PM 

The Men's Intramural program 
will inaugurate its annual season 
Tuesday afternoon when touch 
football games get underway. 

Deadlines for entries in the 
program is this afternoon and the 
leagues season will terminate 
around the first of November. 

Roy Gentry, Director of In- 
tramurals, announced that a 
meeting of team representatives 
is scheduled for Monday at 6 
p.m. in Room One of the Men's 
Gymnasium. Rules will be dis- 
cussed and other pertinent ques- 
tions answered at this important 
meeting. 

Any campus organization will 
be able to participate in the 
leagues, and each of the entries 
are limited to 18 men per team. 

Gentry said that other Intra- 
mural sports will be offered 
throughout the year, with basket- 
ball being the next team sporting 
event. 



Baptists at Northwestern State 
College began their first week 
of vesper services Monday at the 
Baptist Student Union. 

The basic activity of the BSU 
on the campus of Northwestern 
is the evening vesper services 
held daily at 6 p.m. at the 
BSU. These services will fea- 
ture speakers from the student 
body, the NSC faculty, and the 
local churches. Bobby David is 
the BSU program chairman.. 

On Friday nights, Bible study 
is held at the BSU utilizing small 
group discussion as a means of 
learning. 

Highlighting this year's activ- 
ities will be the BSU State Con- 
vention, the Evangelism Confer- 
ence, and Spring Retreat all of 
which are gatherings of students 
from all over the state. 

Practice for the BSU choir will 
be held each Thursday night af- 
ter vespers under the leadership 
of Eddie Simmons. The group 
will be featured at the BSU 



State Convention and will make 
at least one tour during the year. 

Initiating this year's program 
were a retreat at Clara Springs 
Baptist Encampment, and a wel- 
come social last Friday at the 
BSU. 

Under the leadership of Wally 
Hebert, president, and Miss Myra 
Gullede, BSU Director, Baptist 
Students at NSC hope to have an 
active year of witness and fellow- 
ship. 



Registered Nurse 

Full or part time. Apply 
in person to Mr. Sidney 
O' B r y a n, Natchitoches 
Geriatrics Hospital or 
Phone 352-8779. 






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As more new businesses are coming to our state, 

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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 22, 1967 



LITTLE MAN ON CA MPIK 




vV — ANJ? NOW A WC>EP A^our PROP OUTS." 



Cheerleader, Demon 
Resign Wednesday 



Resignation of two NSC cheer- 
leaders was announced Wednes- 
day afternoon by Dean of Stu- 
dents Dudley Fulton at a special 
meeting of the School Spirit Com- 
mittee. 

Fulton stated that Demon Bill 
Nolan and Yell-leader Carol 
Smith had both submitted their 
resignations to him. Their resig- 
nations, according to Fulton, were 
based on an insufficient academic 
average. All cheerleaders must 
have an overall 2.0 average. 

Spirit Cornrmittee member, 
Scotty Maxwell, announced that 
a fresh coed, Ann David, had 
filed for the vacant cheerleader 
position. 

In other action at the Wednes- 
day meeting, Ted Wright, NSC 
business manager, stated that ad- 
ditional seating for 1,00 people 
would be provided for the next 
football game. 

The additional seating space 
would be installed on the East 
side of the field where the fra- 
ternities and the college band 
will now sit under a new seat- 
ing arrangement drawn up by the 
athletic council. 

Wright also explained that the 



college wasn't going into a great 
deal of expense for the new 
bleachers because the College 
President has requested $1 
million for expansion of the 
stadium. 

Spirit Committee head Joe Ger- 
many emphasized that all groups 
wanting to sit together at the 
home games should contact the 
spirit committee so that a seating 
section for the group can be 
roped off. 

Drama Tickets 
Now Available 

Tickets for the College Thea- 
ter fall season are now available 
in the Speech office in the Fine 
Arts Building or from any mem- 
ber of the Davis Players, campus 
drama organization. 

The $3.25 season ticket is ad- 
mission for four scheduled plays, 
including the musical "Once 
Upon A Mattress." Students will 
be admitted to the plays by their 
I.D. cards and are not required 
to purchase the tickets. 



This is Patricia Anne Bales... 




Pat is a senior from Alexandria majoring in Business Edu- 
cation, a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Pi Omega Pi. 

She is your Potpourri Editor this year-already up to her 
lovely neck in yearbook work. 

John C. Guillet PHOTOGRAPHY is sponsor of this space 
and will feature interesting characters throughout the year. 

By the way, we're on Second Street at Amulet 



President's Message 

I would like to take this opportunity to extend to the 
entire student body a warm welcome to Northwestern State 
College, the friendliest college in the nation. 

Our students have witnessed great progress and growth 
in their few years on this campus, and this year's incoming 
freshmen will see unparalleled expansion during their college 
careers. 

Yet, even in the midst of these tremendous changes, 
Northwestern remains a warm and friendly institution, dedi- 
cated to long-standing principles of academic excellence and 
student welfare. 

Northwestern is Louisiana's oldest state college, a leader 
in education for 83 years. We at the college are proud of our 
rich past, but we are even more proud of our present position 
of leadership in Louisiana education. We will continue to 
work to make Northwestern an even greater institution in 
the future. 

No institution is better than its people. The students, 
faculty, staff and alumni throughout the years have made 
Northwestern a great college. 

I would like to encourage the student body to join with 
the administration, faculty and staff in making this the most 
successful year in history of our college. 

If at any time I can be of assistance to any of you, please 
feel free to call on me. 

Welcome again to Northwestern. 

Sincerely, 

Arnold R. Kilpatrick 
President 



SGA (Continued from page 1) 



cent problems that have been 
occuring. 

Song Fest 

A college-wide song fest, plan- 
ned in conjunction with the Nat- 
chitoches Christmas festival, was 
okayed as a SGA-sponsored pro- 
ject by the governing agency at 
their Monday night meeting. 

A song fest, as described by 
Ellen McPherson who recom- 
mended the sponsoring of such 
an event, consists of song presen- 
tations by four groups; sorority, 
independent, church and fratern- 
ity. 

Winners will be judged on 
music selection, performance, 
stage presentation and sound. 
Trophies and plaques will be giv- 
en to the top winners in each 
category. 

A successful event at McNeese 
each year, the song fest is 
hoped to stimulate school spirit 
here as well as cooperation be- 
tween college organizations. Pro- 
ceeds from the fest will go to a 
scholarship fund, according to 
SGA members. 

Miss McPherson was elected by 
President Dennis Newbury to 
head a committee to organize and 
plan the music event. 



Seating Arrangements 

Seating space and seating ar- 
rangements at last Friday night's 
football game were topics of dis- 
cussion by the SGA. 

Members heard Dean Dudley 
Fulton explain that the student 
seating section had been moved 
to the North end of the stadium 
but that neither the band nor a 
majority of the student body had 
been informed of the situation 
due to an oversight. 

Fulton stated that the college 
was planning additional seating 
space, sufficient to accommodate 
all students, for the next home 
game. 

To further investigate the seat- 
ing situation, the SGA voted to 
meet with the Athletic Council as 
soon as possible. 

Entertainment 

Bill Fowler, SGA vice-presi- 
dent, announced at the meeting 
that approximately $7,578 had 
been earned in ticket booklet 
sales for upcoming entertainment 
shows. Fowler also stated that 
all contracts had been signed 
with the scheduled performers 
before the start of the fall semes- 
ter. He also pointed out that this 
was the first time in years that 
this feat had been accomplished. 



WELCOME BACK 
NSC Students 



For any and all cosmetic needs 
shop the complete lines of 



DEBLIEUX'S PHARMACY 



Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Phone 352-4582 



FROSH ELECTIONS 

Freshmen have till Oct. 3 to 
file as candidates for the forth- 
coming Class Officers election, 
Oct. 10. Application forms can be 
obtained at Dean Fulton's office 
in the Student Union for the 
four class offices and mens' and 
womens' representative posts. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 




Box Office Opens 
| Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

— Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Now Showing 
Thru Tuesday 

Lee Marvin 
Ernest Borgine 
Charles Bronson 

Jim Brown 
John Cassavetes 
Kelly Savalas 
Clint Walker 
"THE DIRTY 
DOZEN" 

Color 

Special Admissions 
Adults 1.25 
Children 50 

Coming Sept. 27 

Tony Curtiss 
Claudia Cardinale 
"DON'T MAKE 
WAVES" 
Color 




George Segal 
"THE QUILLER 
MEMORANDUM" 

— Plus — 
Marlon Brando 
"THE CHASE" 

Both in Color 

Sun - Mon - Tues 

Jane Fonda 
Robert Redford 

"BAREFOOT IN 
THE PARK" 
Color 

Wednesday 
"Bucknight" 



Yvette Mimieux 
"DIAMOND 
HEAD" 

— Plus — 
Samantha Eggar 
"THE * 
COLLECTOR" 
Both in Color 




Rush! 



See Page 5 




urrenf S 



auce 



Spirit? 

See Page 2 



Vol. LVI— No. 6 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



INSURANCE ALSO IN QUESTION 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



Students To Vote On Yell Leader Choice 



Cheerleaders and the NSC 
Demon mascot were again 
the center of controversy 
Monday night as the SGA ap- 
proved an amendment call- 
ing for the selection of col- 
lege yell-leaders by a faculty- 
student screening committee. 

Under the new amend- 
ment, if passed in an upcom- 
ing general election, pros- 
pective cheerleaders must 
file letters of intention in the 
spring and try out before a 
screening committee before 
being chosen by the com- 
mittee. 

Eight cheerleaders and a De- 
mon mascot as well as a man and 
woman alternate will be selected 
by a committee composed of the 
athletic director, football coach 
and other school officials. 

Quarter scholarships for cheer- 
leaders for the fall semester only 
are also provided in the amend- 
ment plus a provision requiring 
the yell-leaders to attend all pos- 
sible sports events. Those cheer- 
leaders not functioning properly, 
reads the amendment, will be 
dismissed. 

Students will have an oppor- 
tunity to decide on this constitu- 
tional amendment in a general 
election in the near future. A 
date for the election will be set 
later by the SGA. 

ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

When the students decide on 
the method of selection of cheer- 

Demons 
Number 6 
in the Nation 
(A.P.) 



leaders, they will also be asked 
by the SGA to vote for compul- 
sory student accident insurance. 

If made mandatory, the insur- 
ance would be automatically pur- 
chased by the students at regis- 
tration with the insurance costs 
being added to the fee sheet. 

Students already having simi- 
lar accident coverage would not 
be required to purchase the in- 
surance if he shows proof of his 
other coverage. 

Also by taking insurance com- 
pulsory, a one-third discount on 
the cost would go into effect, re- 
ducing the present $5.99 cost to 
$4.74. 

SEATING SPACES 

Seating space for an additional 
2,000 Demon fans has been pro- 
vided at the Demon stadium with 
the erection of bleacher sections 
at the North, South and East 
sides of the stadium, reported 
Senior Class President Duan 
Ferrera. 

Ferrera, who headed a commi- 
tte investigating the seating pro- 
blem, stated that this week all 
college fraternities and the NSC 
band would be seated on the East 
side of the stadium. Other organi- 
zations wanting roped off sec- 
tions for the game, according to 
Dean Dudley Fulton, should con- 
tact him or Joe Germany, Spirit 
Committee Chairman. 

OTHER ACTION 

Two upcoming elections, Fresh- 
men Class Officers and State Fair 
Court, were planned Monday by 
the SGA. Oct. 10 was set as the 
election date for the Frosh elec- 
tion by the group which also ap- 
proved the selection of the State 
Fair Court nominees by the wo- 
men students at dorm meetings. 

The SGA also voted to do away 
with the traditional SGA Key 
given each year to SGA members. 
By eliminating the keys, stated 
Treasurer Scotty Maxwell, the 
SGA would save an estimated 
$100. 




BEGINNINGS OF A DEMON BOWL? Ifs all still on the drawing boards, but the college has petitioned 
the Louisiana state legislature for over $l-million to complete a proposed horseshoe bend on the north end 
of Demon Stadium. The addition would accomodate men's housing and would more than triple the 
stadiums regular capacity of 7,500. This number icas increased to over 9,000 this week with the addition 
of separate bleachers designed to ease crowded conditions at home games. The new bleachers feature 
high-impact iveather-proof plastic seats. 



All-College 'Free Speech! Forum 
To Tackle Controversy Next Week 

Bv Charles Skinner „„i ..... „ 



By Charles Skinner 

Hiss, boo, heckle, or speak out 
as you like it at the Speech For- 
um currently in banning stages 
at NSC. Pending adminisrative 




approval, Northwestern State 
College students will have the 
opportunity to air their gripes in 
an organized and effective man- 
ner. 

Soon to be brought to this 
campus will be the excitement of 
organized campus debate rang- 
ing from Campus Security to Nu- 
clear weapons. In an atmosphere 
of rigid competition, coupled with 
the knowledge that recommenda- 
tions of the forum will be made 
public, should insure an enthusi- 
astic reception for the forum. 

The first topic for the consider- 
ation of the student body will be; 
Resolved : That the Current Sauce 



is not, but should be, the voice of 
the students. 

When the dates for the first 
forum are known, speakers for 
both the affirmative and the neg- 
ative will be auditioned. The best 
speakers will be chosen, two to 
represent the negative side and 
two speakers for the affirmative 
position. 

Students who obtain tickets will 
be seated on the right side of the 
Student Union Ballroom if they 
approve of the proposition. The 
left side will be reserved for op- 
position of the resolution. 
Free tickets to the student for- 
(See Speech Forum, page 4) 



Tuesday Deadline Set 
For Frosh Candidacy 



STEPPING INTO a busy schedule of appearances at home football games and other band activities this 
Ml are NSC's eight Demon Majorettes (left to right) Dianne Bigner, Sharon Parker, Charlotte Sullivan, 
Mar Autry, Brenda Stringfield, Joy Lynn Kilpatrick, Martha (Dee Dee) Townsend and Lynn Nollkamper. 
*he twirling group will appear tomorroiv night at the half time show at the NSC-Northeast Conference 
9ame. 



Prospective candidates for 
Freshmen class offices have until 
Tuesday at 4 p.m. to file for one 
of three class offices or ten frosh 
SGA associate posts. 

Applications for the freshmen 
positions can be obtained in the 
Dean of Students office in the 
Student Union. 

At the present date, six can- 
didates have tossed their hats 
into the Frosh political ring for 
class president. Seeking the top 
office are Rudy Burnette, Darrell 
D. Cox, Garland Wayne Riddle, 
Dale Stewart, Gene Thomas, and 
Alden Pickett Walther, Jr. 

Vice-president hopefuls are 
Marsha Bella, Sam Burleson, Shel- 
by Dean Herring, James Everett 
Schwartz and Larry Dale Vestal. 

Already filing for Secretary- 
Treasurer are Pam Chandler, Mar- 
cie Fowler, Linda E. Martin and 



Sherlyn Raye Seilhan. Three 
freshmen coeds, Margaret Jane 
Blandin, Irene Morgel and Bren- 
da Stanley are running for fresh- 
men associate offices. 

Ten freshmen associates will 
be selected by a special election 
board review, according to Hen- 
ry Burns, vice-president of men 
and chairmen of the SGA election 
board. 

Freshmen associates, according 
to Bums-, actually are "appren- 
tices to the student government" 
because they are observing and 
participating at SGA and com- 
mittee meetings. They are not, 
however, permitted to vote in 
SGA matters. 

In the election campaign, Burns 
requested that the candidates 
post their signs on temporary 
structures and not 
campus buildings. 



on walls of 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



EDITORIAL 



A Question of Spirit 




School spirit at Northwestern is sadly 
lacking. . .a fact that is clearly evident if 
one attends any NSC sporting event, be it 
football, basketball or gymnastics. 

Most students never think about the miss- 
ing spirit or what can be done about it, but 
after Saturday night's SPIRIT FIASCO, it 
is definitely evident that something must 
be done and done quickly to create some 
NSC school spirit. 

Last Saturday night, Louisiana College's 
fans and cheering squad enthusiastically 
and CONTINUOUSLY supported their team 
with rousing cheers and yells even though 
the fighting Wildcats were definitely out- 
played, out-matched and OUT-SCORED. 

Embarrasingly enough. Northwestern 
fans, drastically out numbering the Wild- 
cat boosters, could barely be heard above 
the referee's shrill whistle. Yet, Coach 
Glenn Gossett's Demon squad is ranked in 
the nation's top ten and is the leading con- 
tender for the GSC conference title. 

Oh, there were a few cheers from the 
NSC side of the field. . .but these consisted 
mainly of the cheerleader's inconsistent 
attempts to arouse dormant school spirit 
with their favorite college yell, TWO BITS! 

Only three of the eight cheerleaders have 
had any collegiate yell-leading training and 
these three have had to instruct the other 
five in the arts of cheerleading. This per- 
haps, is one of the reasons for the criti- 
cisms that is so often heard. . ."They keep 
on yelling the same old things over and 
over and over." 

We're not saying that the cheerleaders 
don't practice and aren't skilled in their 
yell-leading. But they appear so lacka- 



daisical in their yell presentation and aren't 
exactly the symbol of energetic school 
spirit. Perhaps if the cheerleaders them- 
selves became a little more enthusiastic, 
the student body might also. 

Of course, the first reaction to the lack 
of school spirit is to automatically place 
the blame on the cheerleaders. . .but we 
can also find fault with the student body. 

At past football games, the entire stu- 
dent body has sat silently while the cheer- 
leaders were cheering and begging for 
audience participation. There is no excuse 
for NSC students not supporting their 
team. . .one of the best in the nation. 

There are many cures for the lack of 
school spirit but it is surprising that the 
SGA's School Spirit Committee hasn't em- 
ployed such common spirit developing 
techniques as the weekly pep rally to in- 
still school spirit. Of course, the SGA com- 
mittee is hunting for the answers to the 
spirit problem, but we suggest that they 
find some solution before the football sea- 
son is over. 

Maybe part of the cause of the lack of 
school spirit has been that the students 
have been scattered throughout the sta- 
dium. But this situation will be remedied 
tomorrow night when all students are 
seated together on the east side of the sta- 
dium. 

Tomorrow night's game is quite an im- 
portant one for the Demons and they will 
need the support and encouragement of 
their fellow students. It is up to us to pro- 
vide that support — by combining our pres- 
ence at the game with a little "vocal" 
encouragement. 



Band Director Predicts Good Year 
For Spirited '67 Marching Squad 



By Virginia Wooten 

J. Robert Smith, band director, 
considers this year's band to have 
the potential to become the best 
band yet at NSC. Three years 
ago the band consisted of forty- 
seven people; at present, there 
are one hundred and fifteen band 
members, including upper-class 
men. 

Smith has announced the 
schedule of the band concerts for 
1967-68. The first concert will be 
the Christmas program Satur- 
day, December 2, at 4 p.m. in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium. Students 
and townspeople are invited to 
the program which is especial- 
ly dedicated to the high school | 
bands marching in the lighting i 
festival parade. The band will j 
play again in the Fine Arts Au- 
ditorium December 19, 1967, at 
1 p.m. 

A midwinter program will be 
presented Tuesday, February 20, 
1968 in the Student Union. The 




Band Director Robert Smith 



It's What's Happening 



Saturday, September 30 

Football Game — NSC vs. Northeast, 
Demon Stadium, 7:30 p.m. 

Monday, October 2 

SGA Meeting, SGA room, SU, 6 p.m. 
ABA Workshop, SU 316, 2 to 6 p.m. 

Demeter Fraternity and Rodeo Club 
- Meeting, SU 321, 6:30 to 9 p.m. 



Tuesday, October 3 

Phi Mu Alpha Music Workshop, Little 

Theater, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Superintendents Meeting, Ball Room, 

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Breakfast, SU 269- 

270, 7 to 8 a.m. 
Kappa Sigma Pledge Meeting, SU, 7 to 

10 p.m. 

Thursday, October 5 

Movie, "Once More With Love," SU Ball- 
room, 7 p.m. 




band will participate at Mardi 
Gras in March playing a concert 
in Baton Rouge en route. The 
band will perform a concert 
March 17, 1968, for students and 
their parents. A formal concert 
will be held Tuesday, April 30, 
1968, at 8 p.m. 

The band marches at all home 
games, the Tech game at Shreve- 
port andj tentatively pjans to 
march at Hammond 

The Demons Twirlers featured 
with the band are Sharon Parker, 
head twirler; Joy Lynn Kilpat- 
trick, twirler, Lynn Nollkamper; 
Charlotte Sullivan; Brenda 
Stringfield; Dee Dee Tbwnsend; 
Star Autry; and Dianne Bigner. 

Anyone with band or marching 
experience is especially invited 
to join the marching band. Band 
on college level does not require 
as many hours of rehearsal as 
high school band. Anyone inter- 
ested contact Mr. Smith. 



Two bits, four bits, six bits, a dollar. 
All for NSC, stand up and holler. 



Letter t The Editor 



TO THE EDITOR: 

I am taking this opportunity 
to apologise publicly to my fellow- 
students and the administration 
of Northwestern for my unfor- 
tunate behavior last weekend at 
the Louisiana College-Northwest- 
ern football game. 

Iam sure that by consensus, 
I have been a poor representative 
of my school. I suppose my worst 
fault was just caring too much. 

I admit that I did think it cus- 
tomary that when our team makes 
a touchdown the fans are to get 
up from their seats and yell. This 
I did repeatedly, to the apparent 
embarrassment of friends and 
surrounding students. 

I hope everyone involved will 
accept my sincere apologies for 



this appalling behavior, and I 
vow that at future games I will 
try to conform to more accept- 
able practices. I will sit quietly 
in my place, try to appear un- 
concerned about what the teams 
are doing, gripe about the poor 
cheerleaders, and leave the game 
promptly after halftime. 

It will not be necessary to affix 
my signature to this letter — my 
behavior at the game was so ob- 
vious that my identity can be no 
question to anyone present. I do 
hope that this public apology 
makes clear the reasoning behind 
my error, and conveys my sin- 
cere regrets concerning the whole 
affair. 

Thank you, 
(Name withheld by request) 



Minutes of SGA 



President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Minutes were read 
and corrected. Roll called. Absent were 
Ramsey and Hicks. 

Ferrera reported that additional 
seats will be at the stadium for stu- 
dents to be used the remainder of the 
year. Dean Fulton instructed the group 
that any organization wishing to re- 
serve a section in the stands must 
contact Joe Germany. 

Ellen McPherson reported that the 
song fest committee had set price for 
admission and awards to be presented. 
Practice sessions must be reported to 
Miss McPherson. The deadline for en- 
trance is November 15, 1967. 

Bates read Ramey's report on the 
Insurance question. The committee re- 
commended that Insurance tables be 
placed in the fee lines that the ques- 
tion of insurance being mandatory be 
put to the vote of the students. Max- 
well moved the question be brought 
before the Student Body as to 
wether insurance be made mandatory 
here at NSC. Seconded by Townsend. 
Grad called for question. Motion car- 
ried. 

Burns said that AMS will elect their 
officers Tuesday night. Meetings are 
being held to organize the tutoring 
service. 

Election of freshmen officers will be 
on Oct. 10, 1967. The deadline for 
filing will be Oct. 3. It was decided 
the Election Board wUl handle nomi- 
nations of the State Fair Court. 

Daphana Smith reported that the 
Joston Ring Co. would make the din- 
ner ring for senior girls. Mr. John- 
son win return within two weeks with 
a sketch to present the AWS Execu- 
tive Council and SGA. 

It was reported the coke machines 
in Iberville and St. Denis dining halls 
were not working. Pres. Newbury re- 
ferred the problem to the Student 
Services Committee. 

Maxwell proposed the following 
amendment to the constitution for 
the election of cheerleaders at NSC- 
Omit all of Sub-section A. 
Add: All persons applying for cheer- 
leader positions (8 cheerleaders, one 
demon, one man and woman alter- 
nate) shall sign letters of intention 
and turn them into the SGA no later 
than May 1 of the spring semester 
The cheerleaders shall be chosen by a 
screening committee subject to the 
approval of the SGA. The screening 
comm. shall consist of the SGA presi- 
dent, chairman of the school spirit 
comm., Athletic director, football 
coach, basketball coach, gymnastics 
coach, and a dance teacher to be 
named by the SGA president. All applin- 
cants will go through a rigid set of 
requirements to be set up by this 
screening comm. Seven cheerleaders 
and the demon shall receive one-forth 
scholarship for the faU semester only 
The head cheerleader will receive 
one-half scholarship only. The head 
cheerleader will be chosen bv the scre- 
ening committee. Cheerleaders must 
attend all possible all athletic events 
(Word possible shall be defined bv the 
SGA) Those selected as cheerleader 
must attend the National SUSG\ 



cheerleader workshop. The SGA has 
the right to dismiss any cheerleader 
who is guilty of malfeasance. SGA Pres- 
ident shall appoint all vacancies in the 
'Cheerleader squad recommendations 
of the cheerleader screen committee 
subject to the approval of the SGA. 

A discussion took place concerning 
the issue. Gray moved we accept the 
proposed amendment by Maxwell. 
Seconded by Ferrera. Maxwell called 
for question. Motion passed. 

Maxwell moved to omit or to do away 
with the SGA Key to be given to the 
SGA members each year. He stated 
that the $100.00 for this was ridicu- 
lous. Fowler seconded the motion. 
Townsend called for question. Motion 
Carried. 

Fowler reported that more than 
$8,000 worth of entertainment tickets 
have been sold. He commended the 
work of Mrs. Scroggins and the Enter- 
tainment Committee. 

Rispoli mentioned that some system 
should be devised whereby students 
living in Natchitoches might be mailed 
the Current Sauce. It was decided 
that more boxes should be placed 

See SGA Minutes, page 4 



urrent Sauce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weeklv in the 
summer by the Student Bodv of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cnption $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 

Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann. Susie Chancev, Dannv Bout- 
well, Gail Dooley. Ray King, " Gidget 
Maxwell, Jack Montgomery, Shirley 
Rutledge, Alton Sanders, Ray Stephens, 
Ed Thompson, Thomas Turner and Vir- 
ginia Ann Wooten. 



Editorilas reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
□ r the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



SGA Reveals Design Change For 
Official 1968 Senior Class Rings 



College Faculty Promotions For '67 
Announced By President Kilpatrick 



Senior class rings have taken 
on a new look this year with the 
approval of design changes made 
last week by the Student Govern- 
ment Association. 

The new official NSC class ring 
will feature enlarged degree 
numerals and double year dates. 



11 



Dates on the new model rings will 
read 1968 instead of the present 
two numeral, 68, style. 

Alterations in the ring style 
was made by the Josten Com- 
pany which has been hired by the 
College to supply the rings. Jos- 
ten Company, the world's largest 
class ring company, handles over 
one third of the nation's college 
ring sales. 

The rings, which this year will 
be available in a larger stone 
color assortment, can be ordered 
during the last of October from 
the College Book Store, accord- 
ing to a Josten Company repre- 
sentative, Don Johnson of Bossier 
City. 

There will be a five week de- 
livery period, stated Johnson, as 
he explained that the book store 
and purchasing department of 
the school had made special ef- 
forts to have the rings delivered 
as soon as possible. 

This year, senior women stu- 
dents will have the option of pur- 
chasing a miniature of the men's 
class ring or a dinner school ringj 



designed by the Associated Wo- 
men Students. 

Johnson urged all seniors want- 
ing to buy a class ring to wait 
until after the last of October to 
make their orders so that they 
can buy the new official ring 
model. 




FACULTY BRIEFS * 



Dr. Michael J. Cousins, head 
of the department of special ed- 
ucation at NSC, has been named 
to the State Advisory Board on 
Exceptional Children. 

Cousins, a member of the col- 
lege faculty since 1955, is a grad- 
uate of Loyola University of New 
Orleans. He received a certi- 
ficate in social work from the 
University of Notre Dame. 

The purpose of the Advisory 
Board on Exceptional Children 
is to develop more direct lines 
of communication with the State 
Department of Education con- 
cerning the needs of handicap- 
ped children and youth. 



Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, profes- 
sor and head of the Northwest- 
ern State College Department of 
Music, was informed recently 
that his biography will appear 
in the new Fourth Edition of the 
Dictionary of International Bio- 
graphy, which is published in 
London, England. The new vol- 
ume will be published on Octo- 
ber 4, 1967. 

Dr. Carlucci was previously 
honored by a listing in Who's 
Who in the South and Southwest 
published by the Marquis Com- 
pany of Chicago. 



MR. JOE D'AVANZO, 

WHEN ARE THE COKE MA- 
CHNIES IN BOTH CAFETERIAS 
GOING TO BE PUT INTO OPE- 
RATION AGAIN? 



Promotions in academic rank 
of 23 faculty members at North- 
western State College has been 
announced by President Arnold 
R. Kilpatrick. 

Four of the faculty members 
were promoted from associate 
professor to professor, 14 from 
assistant professor to associate 
professor and five from instruc- 
tor to assistant professor. 

Promoted from associate pro- 
fessor to professor were Dr. 
Hugh Land, biology; Paul C. 
Marx, health and physical edu- 
cation; Dr. William A. Philp, ed- 
ucation, and Dr. Donald M. Raw- 
son, history. 

Elevated from assistant profes- 
sor to associate professor were 
Allen Bonnette, Dr. Gordon E. 
Coker, health and physical edu- 
cation; Dr. Thomas A. Clinton, 
Dr. Jack Daniels, education; Tiny 
M. Calendar, Mrs. Eunice M. 
Rodgers, nursing; Dr. Donald O. 
Gates, psychology; Dr. Virgil 
Howe, Dr. Dwayne N. Kruse, bi- 
ology. 

Dr. H. Wayne Hyde, chemistry; 
Dr. J. L. W. Jackson, microbi- 
ology; Miss Mary McEniry, Eng- 
lish; Dr. C. E. Stufflebeam, ag- 
riculture, and Charles Wommack, 
industrial education. 

Promoted from instructor to 
assistant professor were Oscar W. 



Billingsley, guidance and counsel- 
ing; Pearl Domma, nursing; Lu- 
ella Lewis, health and physical 
education; Leola H. Loftin, li- 
brary science and Ann W. Oberle, 
nursing. 

Kilpatrick said the promotions 
were apporved at the last meet- 
ing of the State Board of Edu- 
cation. 



Swingline 



Test yourself... 
What do you see in the ink blots? 



[1] A Japanese 
judo expert? 
Just an ink spot? 
Mount Vesuvius? 




Miss May Beville, assistant pro- 
fessor of music at Northwestern 
State College, was in Shreveport 
recently to serve as music con- 
sultant for a pre-school teachers 
workshop. 

Attending the event were 
elementary and junior high 
classroom teachers, along with 
music specialists. Program ar- 
rangements were made by Mr. 
James R. Lee, Caddo Parish Mu- 
sic Supervisor. This was the 
fourth consecutive year in which 
Miss Beville was asked to give 
lectures and demonstrations in 
Caddo Parish on the skills in- 
volved in presenting music ex- 
periences to public school child- 
ren. 



Dr. W. G. Erwin, Head, Depart- 
ment of Biological Sciences, was 
requested by the National Sci- 
ence Foundation to assist in the 
evaluation of proposals submitted 
to the Cooperative College-School 
Science Section of the Division of 
Pre-College Education in Science. 
Members of the Panel met with 
NSF personnel in Denver last 
week. 

The Cooperative College-School 
Science Program is designed to 
assist public school systems in 
the improvement of instruction 
in the sciences, working in con- 
junction with members of the 
staff at a cooperating college. 
Northwestern State College has 
been awarded such a project by 
the National Science Foundation 
during the past three years. Dr. 
Erwin was the Director of the 
BSCS projects. 



NEW NEW 

By Tussy 
Real Girl Make-Up 

Complete Line 

$1.50 Brush on eye shadow with brush 

1.50 Eyeliner with brush 

1.50 Presesd powder 

1.50 Liquid make-up 

1.50 Mascara-wand 

1.50 Browshaper with brush 

1.50 Eye shadow stick — Many shades 

1.00 Lipsticks 

2.50 Blusherwith brush 

Enter Tussy Realgirl Sweepstakes 

National prize — $2,000 Wardrobe 
Personal Real Girl Kit for Winner in This Store 

McClung Drug Company 

600 Front Street Phone 352-2461 

We Deliver To All Dorms 




[2] An ax? 

A Gene Autry saddle? 
TOT Staplers? 
(TOT Staplers!? What in...) 

This is a 

Swingline 

Tot Stapler 





(including 1000 staples) 
Larger size CUB Desk 
Stapler only $1.69 

Unconditionally guaranteed. 
At any stationery, variety, or book store. 



INC. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N.Y. 11101 

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DAILY SPECIALS 



SPECIALS 



NIGHT SPECIALS 



Waddle N Grill 
& Drive In 

Phone 352-4949 
Highway One South 



Broadmoor Restaurant 

10% discount for all college students 
Phone 352-6120 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 



DAILY SPECIALS 



Wee Waddle N 



Phone 352-8246 
702 College Avenue 



Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



'Speaking Ouf To Be Theme 
For Wesley Coffee House 



Do religion and free expression 
mix? The Wesley Foundation at 
520 College Avenue, across the 
street from the President's cot- 
tage, invites students to come 
and judge for themselves. 

Tonight there will be a "coffee 
house", complete with pop art 
posters and all the other para- 
phernalia designed to let you 
"relax and float downstream" 
and all students are invited. Act- 
ivities will begin at 10 p.m. and 
last until 11:30. There will be a 
varied agenda tonight including 
a short movie entitled "23 Ski- 
doo"; a poetry reading, "I Am 
Waiting"; and a reading by Father 
Bob Luckett, Episcopalian chap- 



lain, from a book entitled "God's 
Trombones". 

Coffee, donuts, and cokes will 
be served for five cents each. 
Athletically-inclined students are 
invited to use the games area at 
Wesley. 

A recent coffee house session 
was termed "very successful" and 
others are planned for Oct. 13, 
Nov. 3 and 17, Dec. 8, and Jan. 5. 

Any student wishing to appear 
on a future program should con- 
tact Martha Lou Carroll at Ext. 
6148 or Chaplain Bob Tatum at 
the Wesley Foundation. 

Don't expect a sermon and pre- 
pare yourself for an interesting 
evening. 



First College Dramatic 
s "More Than Meets 



Off 



<$>3><sxeKSxs><e><SKS><SK$*^$^ 

All-College Speech. Forum- 



(Continued from page 1) 
ums will be obtainable at the 
speech offices in limited quanti- 
ties. A student committee will be 
in charge of selection of topics 
and speakers. 

Although this function will 
take place under the auspices of 
the Speech Department, it is de- 
signed to be an all-campus activi- 
ty. Only NSC students, faculty 
and staff will be admitted to the 
forum. 

Individual participation in the 



forum by students at any level 
will be encouraged, including the 
idea that any one has the right 
to change his opinions on the 
proposition. A person so doing 
may change sides of the room to 
indicate his new thinking. Order 
will be maintained at all times 
by an impartial moderator. 

It is hoped that three or four 
forums will be held this semester 
and that students will submit 
their sugestions for forum topics 
to the speech offices. 



By Frances Toler 

Rehearsals are now in progress 
for "More Than Meets the Eye," 
a three-act comedy by Fred Car- 
michael, scheduled to open Oct. 
11 as Northwestern College 
Theatre's first production of the 
fall season. The show will open 
in the Little Theatre for a three- 
night run with curtain time at 
8 p.m. 

Leading the cast are Lyn Hell- 
inghausen. speech major o f 
Shreveport, and Susan Ehlers, 
speech major of Lake Charles. 
In an aunt-and-niece situation, the 
duo plays foil to Byron Nail 
(speech, New Orleans) as Lyn's 
husband Stanley, and Fred Ma- 
gee (languages, New Orleans) as 
Susan's boyfriend Bradley. 

The play concerns Stanley, a 
young author, who is taking a 
year off to write "the great 
American novel." Unknown to 
anyone except his immediate 
family is the fact that Stanley 
has written a number of child- 
ren's stories under the pen name 
of "Grandma Letty." 

When he is voted "Grandmoth- 
er of the Year," he becomes 
afraid that exposure as a juve- 
nile writer will hurt his chances 
for a novel. Stanley decides to 
impersonate Grandma. Matters 
get more complicated when the 



Ryder, Illusion Exciting Onstage, 
Interesting Backstage At Concert 



By Jim O'Quinn 

They had made the little stage 
into an electric monster with all 
its enrails showing — wires, insu- 
lators, gleaming microphones — 
and then five shouting, writhing 
long-hairs with creaking guitars 
and psychedelic accessories be- 
gan lambasting the audience with 
total, incessant sound. 

The assault lasted half an hour. 
It was an exercise in other- 
dimensional non-music, colored 
with cowbells and soul sax and 
audience participation. For a 
while it looked like the turned- 
on showmen were playing to a 
turned-off crowd, but when the 
frenzied performers began turn- 
ing over tables and slamming 
amplifiers with instruments, the 
reaction was as intense as the 
athletics. 

Then it was intermission, and 
we were pushing our way back- 
stage through the sweating, smil- 
ing members of the group called 
The Illusion. "Mitch is back here. 
Five minutes." 

Mitch Ryder was sitting on a 
bench, alone except for four Loui- 

SGA Minutes— 

around campus, especially in the aca- 
demic buildings. Rispoli said that Mr. 
Joe told him the dining halls would 
; open for the noon meal at 11 a.m. and 
the evening meal at 4:30 p.m. This 
should aid the problem of long lines. 

The cheerleader squad visited the 
SGA meeting after practice and sub- 
mitted three girls names for recom- 
mendation for cheerleader from which 
President Newbury will make the 
selection. 

Towsend moved the meeting adjourn. 

Seconded by Kirk. Question called 

by Lowe. Motion carried. 
Respectfully Submitted , 
Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 



siana Tech Student Government 
Association officials who were 
there to make arrangements for 
the Thursday night Ryder con- 
cert in Ruston. Mitch was finish- 
ing up a cheeseburger someone 
had brought in from the Waddle- 
N. 

"How do you want it, in hun- 
dreds?" a Tech man was saying. 

"Yeah, that'll be fine," said 
Mitch Ryder. "And maybe five 
hundred in twenties." 

"A roll of twenties. Okay." The 
Tech man was taking notes. 

We shook hands, asked ques- 
tions (The changing Ryder style? 
An experiment, testing out the 
public. The immediate future? A 
movie contract, several films 
planned. The Detroit Wheels? 
Still recording up until two 



weeks ago when they broke up 
for good.), and then a bushy man 
with a blonde mustache came in 
testing tambourines. 

"What do you think about the 
crowd?" he asked Mitch. 

"I was listening," Mitch said. 
"I think they want to dance." 

Plenty of room out there." 

"I'll feel them out and we'll 
see what happens." Mitch Ryder 
stood up, and the interview was 
over. 

Minutes later he was out there 
in the belly of the little electric 
monster singing "Hey, Joe, I 
Heard You Shot Your Woman 
Down." When he asked them to 
dance, they crowded around the 
stage and somebody handed him 
a rose. 



This is Diane Nicker son... 




GRILLETTE - ALDREDGE 
JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Bulova & Elgin Watches 
Watchmaking & Engraving 
A Specialty 

582 Front Street 
Phone 352-3166 



Dianne is a senior from Springhill majoring in English, 
a member of Phi Kappa Phi, President of Sigma Tau Delta 
and Junior advisor and Secretary of Lambda Delta. 

She is your Current Sauce Editor, getting the experience 
she'll need when she becomes a newspaper representative. 
Diane's main hobby is writing. 

John C. Guillet PHOTOGRAPHY is sponsor of this space 
and will feature interesting characters throughout the year. 

By the way, we're on Second Street at Amulet. 



publisher proposes, the reporters 
suspect a scoop and won't leave, 
and his wife demands he tell the 
truth or she will leave him. 

Other members of the cast in- 
clude Alice Anne Conner (Eng- 
lish, Natchitoches) as Maude, the 
housekeeper; Marcella McGlothen 
(speech, Opelousas) as the neigh- 
bor, Nora; James Schwartz (pre- 
med, Leesville) as Cyril Hoskins, 
the publisher; Barbara Gresham 
(speech, Natchitoches) as the re- 
porter from LIFE; Bruce Kalman 



enng 

/■• 

ye 



(speech, New Jersey) LIFE pho- 
tographer; Suzy Hames (educa- 
tion, Baton Rouge) as Miss Jen- 
kins; and Charles Machen (speech 
Winnfield) as Lawton Ellerbee. 

The production is under the 
direction of Dr. Edna West, head 
of the department of speech and 
journalism, and Frank Magers, 
College Theatre technical direc- 
tor. 

Students will be admitted to 
the show on ID cards. Public ad- 
mission is $1.50. 




OMITZ BILLFOLDS Reg, $7.95 Now $4.88 plus tax 

ULTRA LUCENT CREAM MAKEUP — NEW 
FROM MAX FACTOR $2.25 plus tax 

REVELON AND MAX FACTOR NEW FALL SHADES 



DeBLIEUX'S PHARMACY 
Broadmoor Shopping Center 
Phone 352-4582 



NEW DRUG STORE 
Second & St. Denis 
Phone 352-2386 



Wreward. 



Wrangler! 
Wremember, 
the "Wis silent. 

Pick up Wrangler jeans for their 
lean, rangy look and get a 
reward -Wranglok®, the wrin 
klefighter finish. It means neat 
ness forever, ironing never, 
Many great jean colors and 
fabrics to choose from. These 
[new wide wale corduroys, 
$6.95. The Mr. Wrangler® hi- 
'roll hopsack shirt. $5.00. Every- 
thing wears better because 
there's KODEL® in it-a muscle 
blend of 50% Kodel poly- 
ester/50% combed cotton. 





w 




Gibsons Discount Store 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



GREEKS INCREASE RANKS AS. 



Page 5 



// 



Rush Brings Expansion, Excitement 



by Frances Toler 

Tke Sororities... 

That harrowing experience, so- 
rority rush, which leaves Greeks 
breathless and rushees bewitched 
and bewildered, ended rather 
quietly Sunday when bids were 
issued. 

Sunday marked the end of a 
two-week period of informal visit- 
ing, open houses, theme parties 
and preferential teas in which 
some 150 women participated. 



Davis, Doris Eaton, Carolyn Ehr- 
hardt, Candy Flournoy, Marcie 
Fowler, Cecilia Graham, Charlotte 
Genin, Kathryn Gray, Barbara 
Hampton, Elizabeth Hemphill. 
Lynda Henderson, Margaret Ko- 
var, Kathy Lawrence, Donna Low- 
derback, Susan Nickerson, Claud- 
ia Quina, Carol Richmond, Sus- 
ann Sanford, Suzanne Scott, Caro- 
line Willis and Rebecca Wynne. 



ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

Nineteen women affiliated with 
Alpha Sigma Alpha. These in- 
clude Bebevly Bingham, Hazel 
Brooks, Janice Collier, Annette 
Couvillion, Mary Fortenberry, 
Mary Frances Ford, Jean Gaw, 
Nancy Houtz, Suzanne Kinne- 
brew, Carrie McClelland, Linda 
Myers, Roberta Purvis, Bennie 
Rikard, Rebecca Riseden, Shirley 
Sibley, Joy Ann Trappey, Ellen 
Uli, Shirley Watson, and Reba 
Welch. 



...and the Frats 

Fraternity men conducted their 
rush the first week of the sem- 
ester. Rush began with the Inter- 
fraternity Council smoker and 
concluded after two rounds of 
parties. 



DELTA ZETA 

Wearing the pink and green 
ribbons of Delta Zeta are 27 
coeds. These include Karen Allen, 
Sharon Baker, Mitzi Brown, Peg- 
gy Carriere, Martha Cathey, Carol 
Cook, Lucy Corder, Connie Dixon, 
Barbara Ferguson, Christine Gau- 
thier, Pat Green, Linda Green. 
Kaye Gurney, Deborah Herring- 
ton, Cindy Holley, Sue Hutchins, 
Phyllis Jackson, Pamela Kurz, 
Mary Anna McClure, Jane McFar- 
land, Claire Mahfouz, Mary Na- 
poli, Rose Presley, Patricia Slifer 
and Catherine Townsend. 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Sigma Tau Gamma pledged 21 
men during rush. They are Tim 
Lynch, Rudy Burnette, John Man- 
ning, Rodney Weeks, William 
Segmaur, Bill Jones, Don Mims, 
Clyde Knox, John Seward, Wil- 
liam Basherville, Curry Miller, 
Patrick York, Allen Fertitta, Stan 
Slaydon, J. V. Radford, Mike Ka- 
cha, Steve Goodheart, Reid Brau, 
David Miller, Wayne Green and 
Guy McFarland. 

The Tau's are also beaming be- 
cause their advisor, J. W. John- 
son, was selected outstanding ad- 
visor at the fraternity's conven- 
tion in St. Louis, Missouri. The 
chapter also received a third 
place award for scholarship. 



SIGMA KAPPA 

Sigma Kappa added 23 new 
pledges to its roll during formal 
rush. New ribbonees include Pat 
Arnold, Fran Arnona, Peggy Bros- 
sett, Becky Buckner, Babs Davis, 
Nancy Hampton, Mary Ann Hata- 
way, Marcy LaFleur, Corky Lass- 
eter, Donna McElhatten, Judy 
McElhatten, Barbara Martell, 
Becky Messer, Jane Moncrief, 
Janet Nicholson, Norma Oliver, 
Lydia O'Quinn, Ann Raphiel, Ev- 
elyn Riggs, Sheri Saloff, Nina 
Viger, Sylvia White and Eleanor 
Younger. 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

Fourteen men have pledged 
Tau Kappa Epsilon. These in- 
clude Richard Krape, Bob Lar- 
sen, Mike Lavine, Charles Balli- 
ro, Mike Sablosky, Thomas Ca- 
palbo, Rick Jaggers, Pete Pelle- 
gatto, David Hardin, Jim Budis, 
Snookie Ferugia, Mike Swingle, 
Jim Parsons and Donnie White- 
head. 

TKE's also elected Bill Austin 
as president for the coming year. 
Serving with Austin are Al Lew- 
is, secretary and "Tex" Morris, 
historian. 



TRI SIGMA 

Tri Sigma pinned purple and 
white ribbons on 27 new pledges. 
These are Gwen Adkins, Susie 
Anders, Marsha Bella, Judy Blair, 
Melba Brown, Susan David, Becky 



KAPPA SIGMA 

Kappa Sigma welcomed 25 new 
pledges to its ranks. They in- 
clude D. L. Alford, C. J. Barth, 
D. K. Beawais, J. T. Boogaerts. 
H. R. Boarknight, R. L. Breed- 
love, R. P. Broussard, M. M. Cha- 
vez, R. K. Ducharme, C. S. Dun- 
bar, T. Fitzgibbons, J. M. John- 
son, G. B. Kevil, T. G. Keener, 
B. A. McNeal, S. A. Murray, L. 
M. Pool, J. D. Precht, G. W. 




Come by the studio and have your beauty struck. 

Look over the prices we have arranged for you. 

8x10 Portraits 7.00 

5x7 Portraits 4.75 

Wallets by the handfull 5.00 

And remember we do not have a sitting charge. 

Uhrbach Studio 



Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Phone 352-556 




Once More With 
Love" To Be SU 
Thursday Movie 

The motion picture "Once 
More With Feeling", starring Yul 
Brynner and Kay Kendall, will be 
shown in the Student Union Ball- 
room at 7 p.m. Thursday. 

Admission will be 35 cents per 
person. Other movies to be shown 
this semester include, "Shenan- 
doah", starring James Stewart. 



Need To Borrow or Rent 

One pair girl's tap dancing 
shoes. Contact Helen Sulli- 
van, 357-6130. 



KAPPA ALPHA'S outstanding scholarship earned the local chapter a 
trophy for maintaining the highest National KA scholastic average. 
Displaying the trophy are Tommy Lewis, KA's No. 5, and Lewis' 
father and KA's alumni advisor, Joe Lewis. 



Rhodes, J. Sanders, A. J. Snider, 
L. E. Thomas, S. E. Wallace and 
C. J. Weaver. 



elude Randy Lee, Mike Gaddis, 
Larry DeBlieux, Jack Mule, War- 
ren Stovall and Mike Mondello. 



FOR SALE 

12 Registered Beagle Pup- 
pies. Contact Mr. Otto 
Hicks at 472-8704 Robe- 
line, Louisiana. 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Six additional men have pledg- 
ed Kappa Alpha since last week 
pledge list appeared in the Sauce, 
thus bringing the total fall pledge 
class to 37. The new pledges in- 



Fountain Blue 
Restaurant 

Hot Lunches 
Steaks 
Sea Foods 



Food and Service 

Highway 1 South 
Phone 352-8059 




Baker's Snack Bar 

FEATURING 

THE NEW MEXICALI-BURGER 

THE NEW TAHITIAN DRINK 
DAILY SPECIALS — LUNCHES Served l':30— 1:30 
THE FAMILIAR PO-BOY SANDWICHES 

A special TREAT: CANDLELIGHT DINNERS after 7 pm 

Located next to Baker's Bookstore Phone 352-4362 

Free Delivery to all Dorms 




SATURDAY, September 30, 1967 

JOE'S COFFEE POT 

Refreshments and Prizes to be given away. Entertainment by the MOODS 
Saturday Night after the game between NSC and Northeast 

SERVING ALL TYPES OF FOOD AND SANDWICHES 
STEAKS SEAFOODS MEXICAN FOOD BAR B Q PLATES 
AND A MERCHANTS LUNCH EVERY DAY 1 1 a.m. Till 2:30 p.m. 

Our Special Feature for our little friends under 10 years of age 
"A KIDDIE'S LUNCH" 

We Serve LUNCH ON SUNDAYS TILL 2 P.M. 

107 CHURCH STREET JOE and BOBBIE PELTIER, OWNERS 

We Can Handle Private Parties and Banquets 
Try Us - You Will Be Glad You Did 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




'Tm* Pi, ACE YOUfcE TAKING ME — I HOPE IT'S NOT GOING 
TO COST MOKE THAN A74 ." 

Biology Major Wins 
National Scholarship 



Junior biology major James M. 
Churchman of Colfax has been 
awarded a $325 Newspaper En- 
terprise Assn.-Fred Arbogast Co. 
Scholarship for Wildlife Game 
Management study. 

He was nominated for the a- 
ward by the Alexandria Daily 
Town Talk, according to Ed Ken- 
nedy of NEA, who announced the 
winner. 

Another $325 cash grant will 
be presented in the spring to 
Churchman who has maintained 
a 3.19 average out of a possible 
4.0. Churchman's advisor is Dr. 
Ray Baumgardner. 

The scholarship originated with 
the NEA comic character Major 
Hoople who "invented" a fantas- 
tically effective fishing lure sev- 
eral years ago. Fred Arbogast 
Co. approached NEA with . the 
idea of manufacturing the lure 
on a commercial scale. 

NEA, unwilling to prostitute 
their comic strip character a- 



greed only if Arbogast Co. would 
pay a five-cent royalty per lure 
and match the amount to estab- 
lish funds for this scholarship. 




SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT 
James Churchman and his advis- 
or Dr. Ray Baumgardner are 
shown following the presentation 
of the student's grant. 



National Poetry Contest Open 
For Collegiate Poets' Entries 



Budding young collegiate poets 
now have the opportunity to en- 
ter the National Poetry Press 
Competition. All winning entrees 
will appear in the College Stu- 
dents' Poetry Anthology. 

Any students attending either 
junior or senior college is eligi- 
ble to submit his verse. There are 
no limitations as to form or 
theme, however, shorter works 
are preferred by the Board of 



Judges because of space limita- 
tions. 

Each poem must be typed or 
printed on a separate sheet and 
bear the name and home address 
of the student as well as the name 
of the college attended. 

Entrees should be mailed to 
Offices of the Press, National 
Poetry Press, 3210 Selb Ave., 
Los Angeles. Nov. 5 is the contest 
closing date. 



BLOSSOM 
FLOWER 

SHOP 

We specialize in NSC Football Mums and are now 
selling unique NSC Football Shoulder Pennants. 



Fast Delivery 
917 Washington Street 



Phone 352-6677 



New Therapy Clinic To Aid 
Those With Speech Handicaps 



Construction is nearing com- 
pletion on a modern structure on 
campus that will house a 12 
room Speech and Hearing diag- 
nostic and therapy clinic. The 
clinic, which is temporarily lo- 
cated on the ground floor of Bul- 
lard Hall, will adjoin Bullard 
in the rear. The projected date 
for completion is Dec. 1, 1967. 

The clinic is the joint effort 
of the Special Education Depart- 
ment and Vocal Rehab, a nation- 
al institution that helps people 
with partial, or full speech or 
hearing loss. 

Approximately three-fourths 
of the 3100,000 construction 
cost is being paid b y 



Vocal Rehab and in return, the 
clinic is working with the public- 
at-large entirely free. Dr. Michael 
Cousins expressed a wish that 
students here needing help with 
a speech or hearing problem 
should contact the Special Educa- 
tion Department for assistance. 

The clinic, the only one of its 
kind on any campus in Louisi- 
ana, will feature a closed circuit 
T.V. camera and monitor in each 
room so that the graduate stu- 
dents in vocal therapy can ob- 
serve proper procedures in thera- 
py. In conjunction with the T.V. 
will be complete facilities of 
video taping. The taping will 
permit important procedures to 



be used for years to come as in- 
structional procedure. 

Contained in the clinic will be 
six therapy rooms, a diagnostic 
room, a classroom, a conference 
room, plus a work and study 
room and an observation room. 
The observation room will feature 
a two-way mirror to enable stu- 
dents to see therapy performed 
on the spot. 

The staff of the new speech 
and hearing clinic includes Dr. 
Edward Matis and his assistants, 
Carol Schmidt and Micheal Far- 
ris. Dr. Matis will head the staff 
of the 4,000 sq.-foot clinic. Future 
plans call for the addition of one 
more member to the staff. 



Placement Office 
Now Conducting 
Job Interviews 

After forty years plus, the 
Placement Bureau begins a new 
year by announcing the time for 
interviews with companies seek- 
ing graduating seniors in all the 
major fields of education here at 
NSC. 

Wednesday, Martin B. Marshall, 
representing the U.S. Civil Ser- 
vice Department, will hold inter- 
views with qualifying seniors in 
all major fields of study. 

Accounting majors are remind- 
ed of the interview time set for 
next Tuesday with the Arthur 
Anderson Company. 

Calcasieu Parish Schools will 
be represented in interviews next 
Thursday to seek individuals to 
fill teaching vacancies. 

Interviews are conducted in the 
Placement Bureau, Room 223 in 
the Student Union. 

Student Teachers 
Number Over 100 

This Fall, NSC's Student 
Teaching Program has placed 111 
education students in elementary 
and junior and senior high schools 
to gain valuable practical exper- 
ience. 

Student Teachers are conduct- 
ing classes in 18 different schools 
throughout Natchitoches, Shreve- 
port, Bossier City, Robeline, 
Winnfield Pineville and Alex- 
andria. 

Several of the students are 
holding classes in more than one 
school. 



College Cleaners 
and. Laundry 

Shirts a Speciality 



123 Jefferson Street 



Phone 352-2222 



Radio Sale 

7-Transistor, Model No. 7747 

only $4.25 

8-Transistor, Model No. 876 

only $4.95 

12-Transistor, Model No. 1047 

only $6.95 

All Radios have Battery Earphone 
and One Year Guarantee 

P&C Drug Company 



116 Touline Street 



Phone 352-2355 




WEE WADDLE N AND 
PANCAKE HOUSE 

Now serving 6 various types of Pancakes 
COMING SOON! Muffy Sandwiches 
Self-Service and reduced prices 
Deliveries from 5-10 p.m. Phone 352-8246 
702 College Avenue 



r'riday, September 29, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



From. Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 

Massacre In Pineville 

Last Saturday night's Demon annihilation of La. College 
by the rather convincing score of 55-6 must surely have serv- 
ed notice to the rest of the Gulf States Conference members 
that Northwestern is no "Paper lion". Although the Demons 
had wrecked Hanover College the week before 49-0, not many 
considered NSC better than a three touchdown favorite 
against the Wildcats. Had not Coach Glenn Gossett been a 
merciful head mentor the score could have been much worse. 
As it was, one touchdown was called back. 

For all practical purposes, the game was over when half- 
back Vic Nyvall set sail for La. College's goal with a 73 yard 
punt return before many of the spectators were settled in 
their seats. Minutes later fullback Barry Fresh barreled into 
the end zone, Deacon Lewis converted his second point after, 
and the score read 14-0. Before the first period was over. 
Fresh found paydirt again, the PAT was good, and PRESTO 
it's 21-0. 

Coach Gossett began spot substituting in the second 
quarter. The Demons responded with another TD, with 
Kenny Callens doing the honors plunging for the last three 
yards. The Purple and White got close again as the half ended, 
but couldn't capitalize, and had to be content with their 28-0 
cushion. 

Ground Forces Surge Relentlessly 

Northwestern's running backs so thoroughly obliterated 
the Wildcat defenses that the gang from Pineville must have 
felt that they were facing "Storm Troopers" swarming for 
every inch of enemy turf that might be accessible. And after 
th dust had settled over the battlefield, NSC had acquired 

quite a lot at that 14,760 inches, or if you prefer 410 

yards by frontal assult. The Demons air support efforts were 
also credible as they complemented the "Blitzkreig" racking 
up an additional 69 yards as the Purple and White field gen- 
erals connected on 5-11 in the passing department. 

Showdown at Hand For Demons 

They are still those who may consider Northwestern's 
first two overwhelming wins a little suspect considering the 
opposition'in each case. Although little, if anything at all was 
known about the relative strength and ability of Hanover 
College (except that they returned 22 of their 1966 offensive 
and defensive starters). La. College had fought a strong game 
against Southwestern before bowing 28-14. 

All doubts should be erased tomorrow night as the 
Demons and the Indians of Northeast State collide in a very 
important game for both teams. The GSC picture should also 
come into clearer focus. (See pre-game story.) 

The Indians haven't been scored upon yet and have won 
their first two games 33-0 and 10-0. They possess a potent 
offense and a grudging defense. 

Northwestern will be seeking its 13th straight victory 
which will tie a school record, and at the same time, attempt 
to eliminate its chief opposition in the conference. 

If the Demons play to their potential and defeat North- 
east convincingly, then there should be no doubt in anyone's 
mind about their prowess on the football field. 

Northeast fans are coming down to the game in a num- 
ber of busses, and locally the game should attract much atten- 
tion. Demon Stadium has been expanded to accomodate re- 
cent overflow crowds, but fans are reminded to come early 
and bring a lot of spirit for this one. 

We need it, and our team can take it and thereby en- 
hance its national prestige. We were still number seven at 
press time, but we could be number one. Surely the support 
of the students will be a welcomed addition to Saturday's 
game. 

A Prognosis Of The GSC 

Before we get into predictions on this week-end's con- 
tests, this column takes pleasure in making public its "Funky 
Forecast for 1967." This is the way we see the GSC teams at 
the end of the season: 

1. NSC (overall balance, and explosive offense, and rock-hard 
defense.) 

2. Northeast (could take it all if the Demons falter.) 

3. La. Tech (Tech may come out of its slumber on the arms 
of Terry Bradshaw and Phil Robertson.) 

4. Southeastern (could be a giant killer.) 

5. McNeese (Cowboys lack balanced attack.) 

6. Southwestern (Ragin' Cajuns won't "rage" 
year.) 

See From Down Under, page 8 




QUARTERBACK BUTCH ROUSSELL of Louisiana College loses the 
pigskin when an unidentified Demon tackier attempts to wrestle him 
to the ground. Assisting in the assault on Roussell is guard Donald 
Durham (63). 

Potent Demon Attack 
Clobbers LC 55-6 



too much this 



By Bobby Ardoin 

Grinding out a total of 410 
yards on the ground, the Demons 
took a giant step in their climb 
up the national ladder as their 
well-balanced attack marched to 
a lopsided 55-6 victory over La. 
College in Pineville Saturday 
night. 

Ranked seventh in the nation 
prior to the game, the Demons 
posted the largest margin of vic- 
tory in the series between the 
two teams since 1915 when the 
Demons won 52-0. 

The yardstick at the end of 
Saturday night's game gave the 
Demons a total of 479 yards of 
total offense to their opponents 
304. Besides the 410 gained on 
the ground, the Purple and White 
chalked up 69 yards by using the 
airways. 

The offensive statistics formed 
a startling contrast to those in 
the Hanover game when the De- 
mons made most of their yard- 
age by passing. 

The Demons surged into the 
lead in the opening minutes of 
the first quarter after kicking 
off and forcing the faltering Wild- 
cat offense into a punting situ- 
ation. 

Halfback Vic Nyvall gathered 
in the fourth down kick behind 
a wall of blockers and eluded a 
host of tacklers to go virtually 
untouched into the end zone for 
the tally. The kick by Malcolm 
Lewis was good, and the Demons 
led 7-0 with 13:04 remaining in 
the initial period. 

After halting the La. College 
running game for the second 
straight time, the Demons took 
the ball on their own 46 yard line 
and marched 54 yards in 10 plays 
for their next tally of the night. 

Fullback Barry Fresh of New 
Orleans ripped through the Wild- 
cat line for the score. Lewis 
split the uprights with the kick 
to make the score 14-0. 

A third score came on a 62- 
yard drive with 2:15 left in the 
first period. On the first play of 
the series. Vic Nyvall blasted 
through the left side for 50 yards 
to the La. College three. 

Kenny Callens then burst 
through the middle for the score. 
Lewis once again booted the 
extra point to make the score 
21-0. 

Fresh scored his second touch- 




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College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



down of the night in the fading 
minutes of the first half when he 
shoved his way through a tight 
hole in the Wildcat line from one 
yard out to make the score 28-0. 

The Demon point total seemed 
to soar in the second half just as 
it did in the first. The potent at- 
tack by the eleven from NSC 
struck again on a two yard keep- 
er play by quarterback Donald 
Guidry. The drive began on the 
Louisiana College 38 yard line 
after Alwyn Phillips returned the 
opening kickoff 52 yards. 

On the following series of 
downs, coach Gossett sent in 
freshman signal caller Mike Pool 
to guide the Demon gridiron 
See Demon Attack, page 8 



Coaching Clinic 
To Take Place 
In NSC Coliseum 

The annual NSC Basketball 
Coaching Clinic featuring three 
of the nation's most prominent 
coaches will begin tomorrow at 
9 a.m. on the hardwood floor 
of Prather Coliseum. 

According to Tynes Hildebrand, 
coach of the Demon squad, the 
purpose of the clinic tomorrow 
will be aimed at giving the visit- 
ing high school coaches tips on 
how to improve on their coach- 
ing techniques, and also to brief 
them on the skills of establishing 
a winning team. 

Heading the list of instructors 
will be coach Roy C. Kennedy of 
East Texas Baptist College who 
will give pointers on the man to 
man defense, and also show ways 
of improving on the zone offense. 

In the 10 a.m. session, coach 
Ted Owens of Kansas University 
will lecture and demonstrate on 
how to conduct the man to man 
offense, the zone offense, and the 
zone press offense. 

Coach W. T. Watson of South- 
ern State will begin his session 
of the clinic at 1 p.m. by giv- 
ing instructions on the pressure 
defense. 

Coach Owens of Kansas will 
take the floor once again at 2 
p.m. to point out the importance 
of team organization during prac- 
tice sessions, the man to man de- 
fense, and the ever popular zone 
press. 

Also highlighting the clinic 
will be a film session showing 
some of the highlights of the 
1966-67 Demon basketball season. 



Men's Intramural Program Kicks-Off 
Year With Touch Football Campaign 



A host of campus organizations, 
fraternities, and independent 
teams renewed their grueling 
touch football rivalries Tuesday 
afternoon as the Men's Intramur- 
al League started their annual 
season. 

According to Roy Gentry, In- 
tramural Director, a total of 18 
teams have been registered in the 
Football League. The teams have 
been divided into three leagues 
composed of six teams each. 

The leagues have been labeled 
as A, B, and C with each team 
playing a ten game slate. This 
year's championship will be de- 
termined by means of a playoff 
between the top two teams in 
each league. 

League A consists of Sigma 
Tau Gamma, Kappa Alpha, TKE, 
Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Phi, and 
the Canterbury Club. These 
teams will play on Field One. 

Those playing in League B are 
the Other 9, Braves, Pig Farmers, 
Consistant Fee's, Wonderful Wi- 
nos, and the Leesville Leaders. 



These teams wil participate on 
Field two. 

PKE, Pas Bas Taus, the Ragin' 
Cajuns, Oldies But Goodies, BSU, 
and the Uncouths make up 
League C. The teams in this 
league will play on Field Three. 

Games are scheduled for 4:15 
and 5:30 p.m. each day, with two 
games played on each field for a 
total of six games per day. 

Referees for the league ball 
games will be those who are ma- 
joring in Physical Education. 
Scores will be turned in by these 
officials each day, and will be 
posted on the door of the Intra- 
mural Office in the Men's Gym. 

This paper will carry each 
weeks statistics, and also carry 
a standing of each teams pro- 
gress throughout the season. The 
scores that are given will be of 
the previous week's games. 

Other activities in the program 
this fall will include team basket- 
ball, paddleball, free throw, and 
ring toss contests. 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 
706 College Avenue 
Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, September 29, 1967 



Tribe Defense May Hinder Demon 
Scoring Machine In GSC Opener 



By Jay Keppel 

Tomorrow night's encounter 
between the multi-talented North- 
western State Demons and the 
surprisingly powerful Indians of 
Northeast State has all the signi- 
ficance of the conference cham- 
pionship riding along with it. 

For the Demons it means many 
things. Of all GSC schools, North- 
east is given the best chance of 
dislodging NSC from its strangle 
hold on the top spot in the con- 
ference. Although the game will 
be only the third of the season 
for each team, the winner will 
not only be in the GSC driver's 
seat, but should then have the 
momentum to sweep through the 
rest of its schedule undefeated. 

Northeast comes to Natchi- 
toches riding a five-game win 
streak stretching back into the 
1966 season. In their first two 
encounters this season, they 
blasted Henderson State 33-0 and 
outlasted Stephen F. Austin by 
a 10-0 count. In the SFA game, 
Northeast rushed for 157 yards 
against a massive defensive line 
that averaged more than 230 
pounds per man. The Indians 
added 77 yards via the air lanes 

College Victory 
Dance Tomorrow 

"Dr. Williams' Soul Empor- 
ium", a band hailing from Dallas, 
Tex., will play for a dance in the 
Student Union Ballroom follow- 
ing the NSC-Northeast game Sat- 
urday night. Admission will be 
by one I. D. card per couple. 

The band features seven male 
members and a female vocalist 
billed as "a white Aretha Frank- 
lin." 

The dance, which will last until 
midnight, is co-sponsored by the 
Student Union Entertainment 
Committee and the SGA. 

Plans are being made to ar- 
range for a dance after every De- 
mon home game. 



hitting on 8-17 pass attempts, for 
a total offense of 232 yards a- 
gainst the highly-touted Lumber- 
jacks. 




GLENN GOSSETT will seek his 
third consecutive win as head 
coach tomorrow night when the 
Demons meet formidable North- 
east at Demon Stadium. 



The Indians return 25 letter- 
men from last year's squad which 
finished with a 7-3 record, best in 
a decade for Northeast. The Red- 
men travel on the arm of stand- 
out quarterback Steve Mansur. 
However, the rest of the offen- 
sive unit is dotted with freshmen, 
red-shirsts and transfers. Gone 
are all four of last season's top 
halfbacks making that the weak- 
est spot in the backfield. Return- 
ing though are all-GSC fullback 
Bobby Scafidel and center Vic 
Bender who along with Mansur 
will have to shoulder the offen- 
sive load. 

Defensively Northeast returns 
nine of their regulars from 1966. 
Heading this group are all-con- 
ference end Charles Rohner and 
middle guard Greg Jubert. 

The high-flying Demon offense 
which has already scored 104 
points in their first two contests 
is again poised for an all-out 
attack. Quarterbacks Malcolm 
Lewis and Donald Guidry are set 
to pull all of their tricks out of 
the bag for this one, which if 
won, can tie the school's all-time 
win streak of 12 games. 

"Super" backs Vic Nyvall, 
Barry Fresh, Kenny Callens, and 



Letter t The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

I fail to understand the reason 
for the complaints about the 
school cafeterias that I heard 
while on the Northwestern cam- 
pus. These complainers must not 
be able to appreciate the quality 
of the meals served to them, or 
perhaps they take for granted the 
imaginative creative art they 
have ingested for so long. 

From what I understand, there 
are other institutions in the state 
which are nearlv as thoughtful 
and considerate as far as quality 
and quantity of food is concerned. 



Richard Loyd Selected For Olympic 
Trials At Los Angeles Oct. 12-13 



Richard Loyd, Demon Ail- 
American gymnast from Alexan- 
dria, will compete Oct. 12-13 in 
the Pre-Olympic trials at Los 
Angeles. 

Loyd, who received two gold 
medals and two silver medals in 
leading the U.S. gymnastics team 
to victory in the Pan American 
games last summer, is considered 
by Demon gymnasts coach Ar- 
mando Vega as a top prospect 
for the U.S. Olympic team. 

Vega stated that "if Richard 



I have heard of men in Angola 
being fed meager helpings of 
bread and water, whereas we 
have all the butter (well, oleo- 
margarine) that one could pos- 
sibly desire. 

The diversity of the menu is 
alone worth 8180-odd dollars to 
witness. I had never imagined 
that there were so many different 
ways to cook potatoes. And the 
ingenious, delightful things the 
cooks do with hamburger is un- 
believable! 

I still have faith in my fellow 
students. I know that they too 
will realize just how lucky they 
are to be able to live through 
this wonderful experience of our 
daily cafeteria food. 

Sincerely, 

Randy Jackson 



performs up to his capabilities, 
he'll make the team." 

Six gymnasts will be selected 
from the field and those six will 
leave immediately for Mexico 
City and the Pre-Olympic games. 
Vega said that if Loyd makes the 
Pre-Olympic team he will be al- 
most assured of a berth on the 
U.S. squad which will compete in 
Mexico City in the Olympic 
Games in 1968. 

Loyd is a senior electronics 
major and a graduate of Bolton 
High School in Alexandria. 



their more than able back-ups 
led by Don Mayfield, Gil Gilson, 
George Green, Alwyn Phillips 
and Jerry Mott should be at their 
best for the game. This contin- 
gent has been the most pleasant 
surprise to date. The cat-quick, 
bull-strong backs have been rom- 
ping at will behind the likes of 
offensive linemen Dave Dawson, 
Bill Stevens, Phillip Creel and 
David Arnold. Center Randy 
Brodnax anchors the blocking 
corps. 

Defensively, all hands are well 
and able which could spell trouble 
for Indian backs. Led by middle 
guard Gerald Malley, tackles Paul 
Alonoz and Mike Creel, ends Da- 
vid Lovich and Randy Tate, the 
defensive front wall has been 
rock-like in yeilding yardage to 
the opposition. Linebackers Ron- 
nie Whatley and Lester Latino 
have been crunching whatever 
gets through the line with amaz- 
ing zest so far, and the defensive 
secondary is coming around and 
shouldn't give-in much, although 
if the Demons have any flaws, 
this could be one. 

Demon. Attack— 

(Continued from page 7) 
game. After alternately keeping 
and giving to fullback Don May- 
field, the former Airline star 
drove the Demons deep into 
Wildcat territory. 

Pool then dropped into the 
pocket and passed to Jerry Mott 
for 15 yards who fought his way 
down to the eight yard line. On 
the next play he pitched to May- 
field who carried up the middle 
for the tally. 

The Demons managed to push 
across two more touchdowns be- 
fore time ran out in the contest. 
Halfback George Green returned 
a Wildcat punt on a spectacular 
63 yard run, and quarterback 
John McClendon rambled for 39 
yards for the final score of the 
night. 

The Demons will open their 
GSC campaign tomorrow night 
in Demon Stadium when they 
face the formidable Northeast 
Indians. The kickoff is set for 
7:30 p.m. 



From. Down Under— 

Around The GSC 

We picked three out of five winners last week, and are 
out to improve our percentage this week after watching most 
of the squads in their second games. With all of that in mind, 
let's take a peek at this week's affairs. 

Northwestern 27, Northeast 14. (Demons must be wary in this 
contest and should not underestimate the NLSC defense.) 

Pensacola Navy 20, Southwestern 14. (Staubach leads Gos- 
hawks to second win over a GSC squad.) 

La. Tech 28, McNeese 10. (Techmen rope down the Cowboys.) 

Southeastern 17, Lamar Tech 6. (Lions show their stuff.) 

Elsewhere In Louisiana 

Tulane 17, North Carolina 14. 

Texas A&M 20, LSU 7. 

La. College 13, Samford 12. 

Longshot 

New Orleans Saints to get their first regular season NFL 
win by chopping down the Cleveland Browns, 24-21. 



Cane Theatre 

-NOW SHOWING- 

— ADMISSION — 
Adults $1.25 Students $1.00 Children .50c 



the war WAGON ROLLS AND THE SCREEN EXPLODES! 




»C^' : ""is 

V||gg||| HKJI-%i 




John VWUBrk 

WAYNE OsfflDOUGLAS 

"the War Wason" 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Scuba Diving Club will 
hold its second meeting of the 
semester Monday at 7 p.m. in 
Room 
ium. 

All 
urged 
those 



1 of the Men's Gymnas- 

persons interested are 
to attend, particularly 
members who were not 



present at last Monday's meeting. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

— Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



TECHNICOLOR «/PANAVISION e 



HELD OVER 
Thru Sat. 

Lee Marvin 
in 

"THE DIRTY 
DOZEN 

Color 

Sun-Mon-Tues 

Tony Curtis 
Claudie Cardinare 

"DON'T MAKE 
WAVES" 

Color 

Coming Soon! 

"A GUIDE FOR 
THE MARRIED 
MAN" 



CHIEF , 

D R IVE,1 N v , 
II 



Last Times Tonight j 

Jerry Lewis 
As 

'THE BIG MOUTH' 
Color 



Saturday 



Anthony Quinn 

"THE 
HAPPENING" 

— Plus— 
Charlton Heston 
'MAJOR DUNDEE' | 
Both In Color 

Sun-Mon-Tues 

Charlton Heston 
Rex Harrison 

"THE AGONY 
AND THE 
ECSTASY" 

Color 

Wednesday 
"Buck Night" 

Yvette Mimieux 

"JOY IN THE 
MORNING" 

—Plus- 
James Garner 

"WHEELER 
DEALERS 

Both In Color 



A BATJAC PRESENTATION • A MARVIN SCHWARTZ PRODUCTION - A Universal Picture 



S« LI 
olor ffl 



Survey 

See Page 2 




urrent 



Vol. LVI— No. 7 




auce 



Homecoming 



See Page 8 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Friday, October 6, 1967 



Parents To Get Red Carpet Welcome 

Game To End 
Eventful Day 




SGA Still Struggles With Spirit^ 
Turns To Other Notable Issues' 



Concern and controversy about 
school spirit still dominate Stu- 
dent Government discussions, 
but Monday evening the council 
turned to a long list of financial 
and social considerations in other 
areas of student life. 

Besides officially re-passing a 
slightly revised version of the 
much-debated cheerleader amend- 
ment (the original passage of 
which was determined invalid 
due to the lack of a three-fourths 
vote of the entire membership) 
and haggling over details of 
Spirit Committee regulations, 
the council discussed arrange- 
ments for State Fair Weekend, 
Potpourri activities, the 1967-68 
SUSGA convention, and the up- 



coming Freshman elections. 

Representatives of the North- 
western and Louisiana Tech stu- 
dent governments will meet on 
campus Thursday to finalize plans 
for State Fair activities, reports 
Junior Vice-President Gaylon 
Landry. Pre-game activities will 
be coordinated by Dr. Edna 
West, head of the Department of 
Speech and Journalism. 

A motion by Student Body 
Treasurer Scotty Maxwell placed 
the Lady of the Bracelet contest 
and the Potpourri Ball, two acti- 
vities formerly sponsored by the 
yearbook staff, "under the dis- 
cission" of the SGA. The ex- 
penses for the two events totaled 
$750 last year. Monday's action 



places them on the docket of SGA 
Entertainment Committee activi- 
ties. 

In other action, $500 was ap- 
propriated at Maxwell's request 
as an advance for expenses of 
the SUSGA convention, to be 
held this year at Northwestern. 

A report from the Song Festi- 
val Committee revealed interest 
on the part of several campus 



groups in a scheduled all-campus 
sing-in. The event is slated Nov. 
30 at 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. All campus organi- 
zations have been invited to send 
a representative group. 

The proposed placement of a 
juke box in the Student Union 
aroused considerable debate, end- 
ing in a motion by Sophomore 
(See SGA, page 8) 



By Charles Skinner 

While Jolly Roger prepares to 
guide the Goshawks in their 
Northwestern debut, the campus 
finds itself engaged in a flurry of 
preparation for the annual Mom 
and Dad's Day. 

Of special interest to parents 
will be the opportunity to see 
what promises to be an exciting 
football contest free with tags for 
admission which may be picked 
up at any dormitory. 

All of the dormitories will have 
open house allowing parents to 
visit the rooms of their sons and 
daughters. The house directors 
will follow this tour with a time 
of refreshment and fellowship. 

Parents touring the campus will 
also have the opportunity to meet 
President and Mrs. Kilpatrick at 
an all-college reception at the 
Varnado Drawing Room, other 
members of the" faculty and staff 
will also be present to partake 
in the food and fellowship. 

For those "brave" parents who 
would like to see college life as 
the students live it, meals will be 
available from 5 to 6 p.m., at the 
Iberville Dining Hall for the nom- 
inal fee of one dollar. 

After the football game a dance 
sponsored by the Student Govern- 
ment Association will be held at 
no charge. 

The Associated Women's Stu- 
dents Organization has planned 
dormitory decorations to coincide 
the theme of the day, "A World of 
Thanks to Mom and Dad" featur- 
ing decorations in each dorm rep- 
resenting a different part of the 
world. 

All of the fraternities and so- 
rorities which have houses on 
campus will honor the parents 
with open-houses. Among the 
sororities, Sigma Kappa will have 
open-house from 1 to 3 p.m.; Sig- 
ma Sigma Sigma, Delta Zeta and 
Alpha Sigma will greet parents 
from 2 to 4 p.m. 

(See Mom and Dad, page 8) 



Frosh Elections Tuesday 



Comedy To Lead Off 
Fall Theater Season 



Can a Grandmother of the 
Year write the Great American 
Novel? 

The least he can do is try — and 
it causes three-acts-full of light- 
hearted confusion in "More than 
Meets the Eye," a new comedy 
by Fred Carmichael which is sch- 
eduled to open the Northwestern 
State College Theatre's fall sea- 
son Wednesday night. 

Based on the delicate dilemma 
°f a serious young novelist who is 
torced to concel his identity as 
grandma Letty, children's author, 
More than Meets the Eye" pro- 
ce ed s from situation to slapstick, 
an d introduces a cast of lively 
characters led by Lyn Hellinghau- 
se n, Shreveport speech major, 
a "d Susan Ehlers, freshman 
s Peech major of Lake Charles. 

As Christine Nichols and her 
niece Peggy, the Hellinghausen- 
£hle rs duo plays foil t0 Byron 

*WU, New Orleans speech major, 
appearing as author Stanley Ni- 



chols, who wants to write "anoth- 
er War and Peace only with more 
of a message," but ends up fam- 
ous for "Grandma Letty and the 
Sweet Smelling Skunk." 

Other members of the cast in- 
clude Fred Magee, Alice Anne 
Conner, Marcella McGlothen, 
James Schwartz, Barbara Gresh- 
am, Bruce Kalman, Suz y Hames, 
and Charles Machen. 

The production is under the 
direction of Dr. Edna West, head 
of the Department of Speech and 
Journalism a t Northwestern. 
Technical direction is by Frank 
Magers. 

Rehearsals are now underway 
for the show, which will open 
Wednesday at 8 p.m. for a three- 
night run in the Little Theatre. 
Tickets for the general public 
are SI. Season tickets for all four 
productions of the fall College 
Theatre season are $3.25. Stu- 
dents will be admitted by I.D.'s. 



Signs are being placed all over cam- 
pus, speeches are being readied and ac- 
tive campaigning has begun as 33 candi- 
dates battle for five freshmen class of- 
fices up for election Tuesday. 

All these office-seekers will have an 
opportunity to address freshmen voters 
Monday night in a special All-Freshmen 
assembly set for 7 o'clock in the Student 
Union Ballroom. 

Frosh voters will then go to the polls 
from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday to select 
a class president, vice-president, secre- 
tary-treasurer, men's representative and 
women's representative. Each of the e- 
lected officers will serve as voting mem- 
bers on the SGA. 

Run-offs are expected in four of the 
five office races as these posts are being 
sought by five or more freshmen. 

Ten candidates have tossed their 
hats into the ring for class president. 
Aiming for the office are Rudy Burnette, 
Rob Corkern, Darrell D. Cox, Macon 
Gean, George Green, Jr., David R. Mar- 
tin, Garland Wayne Riddle, Dale Stewart, 
Gere Thomas and Alden Pickett Walther, 
Jr. 

Another nine frosh are actively cam- 
paigning for class vice-president. Seeking 
election are Marsha Bella, Sam Burleson, 



Robert David Carroll, Janet Churchman, 
Shelby Dean Herring, David Precht, Su- 
san Robertson, James Everett Schwartz, 
and Larry Dale Vestal. 

In the Secretary- treasurer race, six 
freshmen coeds, Pam Chandler, Candace 
L. Faust, Marcie Fowler, Corinne Las- 
seter, Diane Majure and Sherlyn Kaye 
Seilhan, are vying for the post. 

Women's representative candidates 
are Karen Annette Alston, Fran Arnona, 
Peggy L. Carriere, Linda E. Martin and 
Michele Wright. 

For men's representative, only 
three, Merrill D. Dodd, Jr., Louis Fay 
and Gregg B. Kevil, are seeking the post. 

After the Freshmen class officers 
are elected, the SGA will select ten Fresh- 
men Associates from freshmen filing for 
the associate post. Associates, "appren- 
tices to the student government," will 
observe and participate at SGA meetings 
but will not be voting members. 

Associate candidates already filing 
are James Royce Baker, Margaret Jane 
Blandin, Naomi Ruth Cole, Winnie Day- 
phin, Gary Digilormo, Darryl W. Ed- 
wards, Patsy Hansen, Jane Anne McFar- 
land, Rebecca F. Messer, Irene E. Mergel, 
Susan Nickerson and Brenda Stanley. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 6, 1967 



AS, 



auoe. 



Help us find out what you think about it. 
This is the first of a series of CURRENT SAUCE surveys 
to be conducted during the fall semester. This set of ques- 
tions, in connection with the upcoming all-college speech 
forum, concerns the paper itself — what you think is wrong 
with it and what you would like to see done about it. 

Just clip or tear this form from the page, jot down your 
answers to the questions in the space provided, and drop it 
by the SAUCE office in Bullard Hall — the slot in the door 
is for survey forms. 

Be as general or as detailed as you like. Answer all or 
only one question. No signatures necessary. 

1. What is your main complaint about the CURRENT SAUCE? 



2. Is there a new subject or an area of campus life that you 
would like to see covered in the paper? 



3. What features of our campus paper do you especially like? 



4. Do you have any suggestions which you believe would im- 
prove the CURRENT SAUCE? 



Government Grant Totalling More 
Than $22,000 Given Nursing School 



Northwestern State College's 
School of Nursing has received 
a grant of $22,857 from the Pub- 
lic Health Service of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and 
Welfare, according to President 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick. 

Th funds will be used to assist 
professional nurses to continue 
their education at Northwestern. 

Miss Etta Anne Hincker, North- 
western's Dean of Nursing, 
said this is the 10th straight year 
that the college has received the 
grannt to aid nursing students 
in their last year of study. 

Under provisions of the grant, 
Northwestern students who have 
received their diplomas in nurs- 
ing and have become registered 
nurses will be aided by the funds 

LETTER 

Demon Spirit 
Pleases SGA 

Fellow Students, 

The Student Government As- 
sociation would like to commend 
the student body as a whole on 
the School Spirit displayed dur- 
ing the past week and at the NSC- 
NLSC football game Saturday 
night. 

We hope that this past week 
will be the beginning of an ever 
increasing spirit at NSC that will 
carry on throughout the school 
year. Since School Spirit is a 
vital part of every function on 
this campus, we are certain that 
an even better NSC can be ac- 
complished with this new spirit. 

For a better Northwestern, 

Your SGA 



if they wish to return to college 
to work toward their bachelor's 
degrees. 

Dean Hincker said about 10 stu- 
dents will be aided by the grant 
money and some 20 nursing stu- 
dents will be on advanced traine- 
eship programs during the year. 
Most of the students who return 
to work toward their bachelor's 
degrees are nursing graduates 
who are now affiliated with hos- 
pital schools throughout the 
state. 

Noted Chemist 
To Speak Here 

American Chemical Society's 
Ark-La-Tex section will meet 
here Wednesday, according to 
Dr. H. Hyde, department of chem- 
istry. 

Sponsored by the college's 
chemistry department and local 
Sigma Xi, chemical fraternity 
chapter, the meeting will feature 
a lecture by noted chemist, Dr. 
Edward Amis, University of 
Arkansas. 

The ACS meeting gets under- 
way with a banquet at 7 p.m. in 
the Student Union Room 269. 
Dr. Amis's lecture, which is open 
to the general public, all students 
and faculty, will be conducted in 
Fournet Hall, Room 107, im- 
mediately follwing the general 
dinner meeting. 

A graduate of the University of 
Kentucky and Columbia Univer- 
sity, Dr. Amis has taught for 
many years at the LSU and the 
University of Arkansas. He is a 
fellow of the New York Academy 
of Sciences and a 1959 recipient 
of the Southern Chemist Award. 



6,331 Students 



Fall Enrollment Soars 
To Largest In History 



Fall enrollment showed the 
largest increase this year in the 
school's history, soaring to 6331 
for an all-time record, according 
to President Arnold R. Kilpatrick. 

The total registration figure is 
an increase of 1,123 over last 
fall's enrollment of 5,203. This 
year's enrollment mark is a jump 
of 22 percent over the 1966 regis- 
tration figure. 

Both the percentage increase 
and the additional number of 
students are the largest in the 
83-year history of the college. 

Increases were evident in all 
five schools of the college. The 
graduate school showed the lar- 
gest enrollment hike with an en- 
rollment of 1,305 this fall com- 
pared to 776 last fall. 

The School of Business increas- 
ed in students from 1,303 last 
year to 1,553. Other figures by 
schools are 1,270 in Arts and 
Sciences, 1,850 in Education and 
353 in Nursing. 

New Specialist Degrees and ex- 
panded program offerings are re- 
sponsible for part of the increase, 
particularly in the 41 percent 
jump in the Graduate School. 

This year's freshmen class of 
more than 1,850 is the largest in 
history. New enrollment records 
were evident when the flood of 
freshmen reported to the campus 
in mid-September for orientation 
and testing. 

The enrollment increase has 
been felt throughout the campus. 
The Director of Housing reports 
that 3,377 students are living on 
campus. This is an increase of 
more than 200 over last year and 
is the largest number of students 
ever housed on the college's cam- 
pus. 

Some 9,000 meals a day are 
being served to students in the 
college's two dining facilities. 
The 3,200 students holding cam- 
pus meal tickets is an increase of 
some 800 over last fall. 

In the past decade, Northwest- 
ern's enrollment has grown from 
2,270 in 1957 to the present figure 
of 6,631. 

Dr. Kilpatrick said, "We are in- 
deed proud of the tremendous in- 
crease in enrollment at North- 
western. Certainly, we feel that 
the expansion of our academic 
departments and our growth in 
the physical plant have been de- 
termining factors in the increase. 

"We are now offering new Spe- 
cialist Degrees in Education, new 
Associate Degrees and have ex- 
panded our degree offerings and 
academic programs throughout 
the college. All of these educa- 
tional advances have had much 
to do with our evident success." 



It's What's Happening 



Saturday, October 7 

Mom and Dad's Day — All Day 
Football Game — Pensacola Navy vs. 

NSC Demons, Demon Stadium, 

7:30 p.m. 
Sunday, October 8 

President's Reception, SU Ballroom, 

3:30-5:00 p.m. 
Concert Hour, KNOC Radio, 1 p.m. 
Monday, October 9 

History Seminar, SU Room 315, 10 

a.m. 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, 6 p.m. 

Demeter Fraternity and Rodeo Meet- 
ing, SU 321, 6:30 p.m. 
Tuesday, October 10 

Foreign Dish Meal, Coliseum, 6:30 
p.m. 



Pi Kappa Pi Meeting, SU 320, 7:30- 
9:30 p.m. 

Wednesday, October 11 

Ark-La-Tex Chemical Society Banquet, 

SU 269, 7 p.m. 
Play— "More Than Meets the Eye," 

Little Theatre, 8 p.m. 

Thursday, October 12 

Play — "More than Meets The Eye," 
Little Theatre, 8 p.m. 

Friday, October 13 

Women's Invitational Volleyball 
Tournament, Men's and Women's 
Gymnasium, 4 p.m. 

Play— "More Than Meets The Eye," 
Little Theatre, 8 p.m. 



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1957 



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CM 



1958 



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1961 



oo 

to 



1962 



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1963 1961 



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oo 



196? 



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CM 



1966 



UP 
12% 



1967 



Minutes of SGA 



Monday/ October 2, 1967 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Minutes were read 
and approved. Roll called. All SGA 
members were present. 

Landry reported on State Fair Week- 
end. He said that the meeting of the 
SGA members from NSC and Tech will 
be at 11:00 this year. The place of the 
meeting will be announced at a later 
date. Letters have been sent to the 
car dealers in Shrevport for cars to be 
used in the parade. We are expecting 
an answer any time. Dr. West will co- 
ordinate the pre-game activities. On 
Thursday, at 6:30 p.m., there will be 
a meeting of the representative mem- 
bers of the NSC and Tech SGA in the 
SGA room here in the Student Union. 
Final plans of Tech weekend will be 
made at that time. Wreck Tech signs 
have been ordered. 

Rispoli reported that the coke 
machines are now working. The new 
times the dining hall will be open 
for dinner and supper will be printed 
in the Current Sauce. 

Fowler reported that the receipts at 
the gate for the Mitch Ryder show was 
approximately $900. The total entertain- 
ment ticket fund is now $10,580.24. 

Pres. Newbury said that each of us 
should keep in mind our positions as 
college elected leaders while at all 
college functions. He mentioned that 
none of the SGA members should have 
danced at the Mitch Ryder show on 
the basketball court. 

Burns reported on the Elections 
Board Committee. A list was made for 
students to work at the Frosh elections 
to be held on October 10, 1967. Max- 
well said he felt that a ralley in the 
form of an allKreshman assembly 
should be held. Nomination and accep- 
tance speeches would be made here. 
It was felt that more interest would be 
aroused at an assembly than at a dance. 

Burns told the SGA that the nursing 
students at clinical would be sent bal- 
lots on which to vote for the State Fair 
Court. 

Bates reported that the 32 people had 
already filed for Freshman elections. 
Posters will be placed in dormitories 
on campus to publize. 

Germany reported that letters are 
being sent to the students on campus 
each week in order to help promote 
school spirit. He stated that he and his 
committee are continuing to work to 
promote more school spirit. Townsend 
commended the committee, the cheer- 
leaders, and the students for the spirit 
displayed at the NSC-Northeast game. 

MacPherson reported that the final 
rules and regulations for the song fest 
will be decided at the next committee 
meeting. A letter has been sent to all 
presidents of the organizations on cam- 
pus to inform them of the song fest in- 
formation. 

Gray moved that the problem of plac- 
ing a juke box in the student union be 
referred to the Student Union Board 
with a recommendation that if possible 
a juke box be placed in the union. 
Seconded by Fowler. Question called 
by Townsend. One opposed. Motion car- 
ried. 

Ferrera moved we appropriate $500 
for expenses in advance for SUSGA. It 
was explained that this money will be 
paid back into the SGA fund when the 
SUSGA state membership dues come 
in. Seconded by Gray. Question called 
by Skinner. Motion carried. 

Maxwell moved that the Lady of the 
Bracelet contest and the Potpourri Ball 
be placed under the discression of the 
SGA. Seconded by Butler. Question 
called by Gray. Motion passed. 

Maxwell said that a Petty Cash fund 
could probably be arranged with the 
auditors office and after consultation 
with Miss Graves a recommendation 
would be brought before the SGA. 

McColIum, parliamentarian, pointed 
out that the constitutional amendment 
voted on previously was invaled due to 
lack of 2/3 vote of the entire member- 
ship. After a discussion on the cheer- 
leader selection, Skinner proposed an 
amendment stating that those applying 
for cheerleader positions will be limit- 
ed to a number of not more than 18 
finalists who would then compete for 
the cheerleader position in a student 
body election. Ramsey seconded. Ques- 
tion called by Lowe. Eight voted for 
the amendment. 10 voted against the 
amendment. Motion defeated. 
Maxwell proposed the following 



amendment concerning election of 
cheerleaders: 

Omit all of subsection A. 
Add: All persons applying for cheer- 
leader positions (8 cheerleaders, one 
demon, one man and woman alternate) 
shall sign letters of intention and turn 
them into the SGA no later than May 
1 of the spring semester. The cheer- 
leaders shall be chosen by a screening 
committee subject to the approval of 
the SGA. The screening committee shall 
consist of the SGA president, chairman 
of the school spirit committee, Athletic 
director, football coach, basketball 
coach, gymnastics coach, and a dance 
teacher to be named by the SGA presi- 
dent. All applicants will go through a 
rigid set of requirements to be set up 
by this screening committee. Seven 
cheerleaders and the demon shall rceive 
1 /4 scholarship for the fall semester 
only. The head cheerleader will receive 
1 /2 scholarship for the fall semester 
only. Cheerleaders must attend all pos- 
sible athletic events. (Word possible 
shall be defined by the SGA) Those 
selected as cheerleader must attend the 
National SUSGA cheerleader workshop. 
Th SGA has the right to dismiss any 
cheerleader who is guilty of malfeas- 
ance. SGA President shall appoint all 
vacancies in the cheerleader squad up- 
on the recommendations of the SGA. 
The effective date shall be the coming 
spring semester. Seconded by Gray. 
Ferrera called for question. 15 voted 
for the amendment. 5 voted against the 
amendment. Motion carried. 

A discussion took place as whether 
to buy the cheerleaders blazers to wear 
as part of their uniform to and from 
games, etc. It was decided that other 
equipment was needed more. 

Maxwell moved that the far East 
stands be reserved for NSC students 
only for the McNeese game only. Butler 
seconded. Fowler called for question. 
Motion carried. 

Maxwell said a letter should be writ- 
ten to the Current Sauce from the SGA 
congratulating the student body and 
the cheerleaders on school spirit dis- 
played at the NSC-NLSC football game. 
Pres. Newbury said it would be taken 
care of. 

It was mentioned that the score board 
clock needed to be fixed and the P. A. 
system needed to be directed toward the 
East stands too. 

Gray moved the meeting be adjourn- 
ed. Seconded by Riehl. Question called 
by Fowler. Motion carried. Meeting 
adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Jan Warren, Secretary of 
SGA 



urrent 



■auce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weeklv in the 
summer by the Student Bodv of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 

Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson Staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann, Susie Chancey, Danny Bout- 
well, Gail Dooley, Ray King, Gidget 
Maxwell, Jack Montgomery, Shirley 
Rutledge, Alton Sanders, Ray Stephens, 
Ed Thompson, Thomas Turner and Vir- 
ginia Ann Wooten. 



Editorilas reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Friday, October 6, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



Psychology, Guidance Faculty Brief 

Clinic In Operation 



Beginning Monday, the De- 
partment of Psychology and 
Guidance will conduct a counsel- 
ing program for all college 
students. 

The new program will be under 
the supervision of Dr. Jack L. 
Daniels, associate professor of 
Educational Psychology and Guid- 
ance. Assisting Dr. Daniels with 
the counseling and testing are 
four Northwestern graduate stu- 
dents. 

The primary purpose of the 
program is to assist interested 
college students in discovering 
more about their abilities and 
interests, and to help determine 
which areas of study the student 
is best qualified. This is designed 
to give the student a better self- 
appraisal of his ambitions. 

In order to assist these evalu- 
ations, the student may have his 
American College Test (ACT) 
scores interpreted to him, or at 



ALD Breakfast 
Tuesday Honors 
Sophomore Coeds 

Approximately thirty women 
students were guests of Alpha 
Lambda Delta, an honorary fra- 
ternity, Tuesday for an orienta- 
tion breakfast in the Student 
Union. 

All those attending the break- 
fast had maintained a 3.5 or bet- 
ter grade average in the spring 
semester of their freshmen year 
and were being orientated to the 
organizational purposes of Alpha 
Lambda Delta which requires for 
membership a 3.5 average for the 
freshmen year. 

ALD president Marjorie Padula 
and treasurer Cyndee Osburne, 
discussed ALD rules, dues and 
other aspects of the organization. 
Special guests Tuesday were 
Dean Lucile Hendricks, an ALD 
honorary member, and Mrs. 
Arnold Kilpatrick who will soon 
be initiated as an honorary mem- 
ber 

Presently there are 33 ALD 
members with sophomore coeds 
serving as the only active mem- 
bers in the organization. 

College-Industrial 
Trainee Program 
Now In Effect 

Students in technical education 
will now have an opportunity to 
participate in a new cooperative 
program with Northwestern and 
industrial firms. 

Majors in electronics or ma- 
chine tools will spend two years 
on the campus and the third one 
in one of the cooperating indust- 
ries, where they will receive on- 
the-job training. 

Each of these students will be 
placed on the company's payroll 
in addition to receiving college 
credit for the work experience. 

Industries that have initially 
agreed to cooperate with the pro- 
gram are Baifield Industries of 
Shreveport and Dallas, Ling-Tem- 
co-Vought of Dallas. 

Co-op students will be able to 
complete the degree in four years 
by attending three summer ses- 
sions. Without summer school, 
five years are required for com- 
pletion. 

Northwestern students James 
D umas and Bill Treadway worked 
at Baifield Industries during the 
summer on an experimental bas- 
ls . and several students have been 
assigned to both Baifield and 
L mg-Temco-Vought for the fall 
semester. 

Larry DeWane, personnel man- 
ager of Baifield, said the pro- 
gram contributes not only to the 
students' education but serves an 
important purpose in supplying 
m en for industry. 



his descretion, he may take addi- 
tional tests which the advisor 
might suggest, however these 
would be optional. 

Other persons not wishing to 
take further tests, may schedule 
interviews to discuss personal 
problems such as social adjust- 
ment, or emotional problems. 
Guidance will also be offered in 
such areas as vocational plans, 
study habits, skills, educational 
difficulties and other related 
topics. 

Students are reminded that all 
services offered will be absolutely 
free of cost. 

Appointments may be arranged 
by calling Dr. Daniels' office at 
(357) 6555, or by a personal visit 
in Room 323 of Warren Easton. 

All interviews will be conduct- 
ed in the guidance and counsel- 
ing laboratory in Warren Easton 
Hall. 



The College's Central Louisi- 
ana Alumni Chapter met Thurs- 
day night in Alexandria at the 
Plantation Manor. 

Some 100 members attended 
the meeting, which got under 
way at 6:30 p.m. with a social 
hour. 

Attending from Northwestern 
were Dr. Arnold R. Kilpatrick, 
president; Dean of the College 
Charles F. Thomas; Director of 
Alumni and Placement Harrel 
Haile; Assistant Supervisor of 
Alumni and Placement E. H. Gil- 
son, and Dean of Education Dr. 
Tom Paul Southerland. 

Travis Randies, president of 
the Central Louisiana Chapter, 
handled the arrangements for the 
meeting. 



Freshman Coed Wins 
FHA Scholar skip 

— . ~ — . — — — ... ■ 




Dr George H. Ware, director 
of the conservation section of the 
North Louisiana Supplementary 
Education Center here, has been 
appointed to the Test Construc- 
tion Committee of the Biological 
Sciences Curriculum Study. 



FHA SCHOLARSHIP recipient 
Barbara Hampton is shown with 
College President Arnold Kil- 
patrick as he presents the former 
Natchitoches High School FHA 
chapter president with the State 
Future Homemakers of America 
Scholarship given each year to 
an outstanding FHA member. 



A freshman Home Economics 
major, Barbara Hampton, has 
been awarded the State Future 
Homemakers of America Scholar- 
ship for 1967. 

Miss Hampton, who entered 
Northwestern this semester is a 
1967 Natchitoches High School 
graduate and former president 
of the Natchitoches Chapter of 
FHA. 

Each year, the state Scholar- 
ship is presented to a high school 
senior planning to major in Voca- 
tional Home Economics in col- 
lege. 

The award is granted on the 
basis of the student's activity in 
the high school FHA program, 
contributions to the local chapter, 
scholastic achievement and a 
written statement on "Why I 
plan to Pursue Home Economics 
as a career." 




A new girl 
for girl-watchers 
to watch... 



Her name is Joan Parker, and she's the new Dodge Fever GinV 
Watch her on television this season, dispensing Dodge Fever, 
sto a variety of unsuspecting souhMDodge's TV; 
schedule is listed below.) 




A new car 
for car- lovers 
to love . . . 



Its name is Charger, and it's the best-looking Dodge ever built. 
Complete with disappearing headlights and sports-car styling that 

features a European-type spoiler on the rear deck. But since 
looks aren't everything, we made it exciting to drive, with a 318-cu.-in. V8, 
bucket seats and an airplane-type instrument panel. Even pockets in 
the doors for your shades and/or rally maps. With all this included, 
we've reduced Charger's list price by more than $100. Maybe you can t 
please everybody, but we sure try. See your Dodge Dealer right away. 




both 

from Dodge. 

You know, the people who build the cars 
that give you . . . Dodge Fever. 

DODGE'S TV SCHEDULE FOR OCT., 1967 

Oct. 2, 16, 30 Gunsmoke 

Oct. 5, 19, 26 Thursday Night at 

the Movies 

Oct. 7, 14 Mannix 

Oct. 1, 22 The Smothers 

Brothers 

Oct. 8, 15, 22, 29 Mission: Impossible 

Oct. 8, 22 AFL Football i 

Oct. 5, 8, 11 The World Series ™L>' 

These dates subject to change. 



CHRYSLER 

MOTORS CORPORATION 



Page 4 



iHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 6, 1967 



Frats Add Pledges 



Phi Mu Joins Circle 
Of Campus Sororities 



By Frances Toler 
PHI MU 

Joining the family of national 
sororities on our campus is a 
colony of Phi Mu consisting of 
25 pledges and two initiated mem- 
bers. After the fall semester, the 
colony will initiate its pledges 
and receive its charter as a col- 
lege chapter. 

New pledges of the colony are 
Linda Ander, Karen Alston, Phy- 
llis Brasher, Claire Crumplar, 
Linda Cunningham, Susan Ehl- 
ers, Mary Elders, Sandra Fant, 
Candace Faust, Dianne Garmley, 
Jennifer Garrett, Joan Grant, 
Peggy Harmon, Colleen Irwin, 
Beth Leach, Sue Ann McAndrews, 
Miki McWilliams, Martha Min- 
ville, Susan Moses, Judy Phillips, 
Brenda Stringfield, Charlotte Sul- 
livan, Mary Vacca, Kristl Volk, 
Sally Wells and Cherie McNeil. 

Active initiates who were in- 
strumental in establishing the 
colony are Barbara Gresham and 
Joy Lynn Kilpatrick. 

Officers of the colony include 
Mary Vacca, president; Jennifer 
Garrett, vice president; Sally 
Wells, secretary; and Phyllis 
Brashear, treasurer. 

PI KAPPA PHI 

Pi Kappa Phi pledged 23 men 
in formal rush. They include 
Mike Adams, Dwight Boudreaux, 
Charles Brown, Allen Botts, Gor- 
don Burton, Denny Dodd, Sid 
Farmer, Bill Toushag, Macon 
Gean, Owen Gibbs, Reggie Har- 
vey, James Hooter, James Lovell, 
Randy Martin, Donnie Myers, 
Daryl Nichols, Jesse Hammett, 
Stan Russell, Steve Spann, Dan 
Spurlock, Lynn Todd and Scott 
West. 

Serving as officers of the active 
chapter are Tommy Ferguson, 
president; George Mandeville, 
treasurer; Freddie Litton, secre- 
tary; Calvin Campbell, pledge 
master; Paul Jeansonne; warden; 
Choo Dalton, chaplain; John 
Shaw, social chairman; and Tom 
Tynes, historian. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

Three men have pledged Kappa 
Alpha recently, bringing the total 
to 40 for the fall pledge class. 
They are Danny Sullivan, Dickie 
Neely and Jim Stevens. 

The new pledges will join their 
brothers tonight at the old St. 
Mary's gym for the fraternity's 



JOHN'S 
Read More 



Open 

Monday thru Saturday 
9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Sunday 
12:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. 

Complete Line of 
Pleasure Reading 

• Magazines 

• Paperbacks 

• Books 

— Ask Us — 
If We Don't Have It. . . 
We Will Order It 

105 Church Street 
Nakatosh Hotel Bldg. 




PHI MU COLONY officers (left to right) are Jennifer Garrett, vice 
president; Mary Helen Vacca, president; Colleen Irwin, junior pan- 
hellenic delegate; Martha Minville, senior panhellenic delegate; Sally 
Wells, secretary; and Phyllis Brasher, treasurer. The colony has 25 
pledges at present. It will achieve status as a college chapter in the 
spring. 



"Flower Power" party which is 
being planned by Steve Shine. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Sigma Tau celebrated the De- 
mons' victory over the Indians 
with a dance at St. Mary's. Tau's 
plan to use this means of cele- 
brating the Demons' good fortune 
after all home games. 

Another dance will be held in 
Shreveport by the Tau's after 
the Tech game. Present site of 
the dance is the Progressive Men's 
Club on Cross Lake. 

Tau's will also sell "Tech but- 
tons" before the big game. 

Weight-Lifting 
Club Is Formed 

The newly-formed college 
Weight Lifting Club will meet 
Monday night to discuss organi- 
zational plans and elect officers 
for the school year. 

Already some 25 students have 
joined the organization and 
another 15 to 20 prospective 
members are expected to attend 
the club meeting at 7 p.m. Mon- 
day in the Men's Gym. 

Any student interested in join- 
ing the club should attend the 
meeting or contact Ricky Howard 
or club sponsor, Coach Armando 
Vega. Club members are remind- 
ed to bring their yearly dues, $2. 



SLTA Reception, 
Monthly Meeting 
Open Fall Program 

With the opening of the fall 
semester, one of the college's lar- 
gest student organizations, the 
Student Louisiana Teacher's As- 
sociation, began their fall slate 
of activities. 

Opening the new school year, 
the organization held its annual 
fall reception last Tuesday in the 
Varnado Drawing Room. The re- 
ception, given so that SLTA mem- 
bers could become better acquain- 
ted. Special guests at the recep- 
tion for student members and 
education department heads, 
were Mrs. Arnold Kilpatrick, Mrs. 
Charles Thomas, Mrs. George 
Stokes, Mrs. Leo T. Albritton, 
Dean Southerland, Dr. John Ky- 
ser, Dr. Michael Cousins, Dr. Ray 
McCoy, Dr. Lisso Simmons, Dr. 
Robert Alost and SLTA's new 
sponsors, Dr. E. W. Burge and 
Ronald Bradberry. 

Anyone interested in joining 
SLTA may obtain membership 
forms in the SLTA office in War- 
ren Easton 322. Due to a time 
factor, all interested students 
should make an attempt to join 
before Oct. 15 



DINE and DANCE 
every night except Sunday 

JOE'S COFFEE POT 



Bring Mom and Dad 
for our Sunday Special 

And enjoy our pleasant atmosphere and recreation area 

All meals are served with unique trimmings 

Monday-Saturday — 6 a.m.-9 p.m. 
Sundays — 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 

Open after all football games, so bring your dates by 
and celebrate the Demon Victories with Joe 

107 Church Street Joe and Bobbie Peltier, Owners 



Tryouts Set Next Week For Greek 
Comedy, Second Dramatic Offering 



Tryouts for "Amphitryon 38," 
Jean Giraudoux's classical farce 
about the loves of Gods and men, 
have been scheduled Monday, 
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 
from 3-5 p.m. in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 

The three-act comedy, which 
has roles for six men and four 
women, will be the second pro- 
duction of the fall College The- 
atre season. Other scheduled 
shows are "More Than Meets the 
Eye," "The Dark at the Top of 
the Stairs," and "Once Upon a 
Mattress." 

"Amphitryon 38," adapted by 
S. N. Behrman from the original 
French of Jean Giraudoux, has 
been lauded as a sumptious liter- 
ary work with glittering dialogue. 



The farcical plot is an anecdote 
about one of Jupitor's less pub- 
licised affairs — his night with 
Alkmena, wife of Amphitryon of 
Thebes, from which casual affair 
Hercules was born. 

The original New York pro- 
duction of "Amphitryon 38" was 
staged in 1937 with Alfred Lunt 
and Lynn Fontanne as Jupiter 
and Alkmena. The show calls 
for unusual sets and costumes, 
which combine with imaginative 
interplay between almost-modern 
mortals and Olympian immortals 
to create a profound, diverting, 
and very funny theatre event. 

The College Theatre production 
is scheduled Nov. 16 and 17 on 
the main stage in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 



We still sell the best class ring 
"JOHN ROBERTS" 
Taking orders everyday 

B A K E R' S 

Town & Campus Bookstore 

NSC's Favorite Bookstore 



We demand 
we had to 



equal time — However 
pay for this ad -Darn it. 



Now- 
one more thing 
not to 

worry about 

Neat discreet bags 
for pad disposal 
come FREE in each 
pretty new box of 

Scott Confidets. 




Friday, October 6, 1967 

State Fair Court 
Nominees Chosen; 
Election Date Set 

State Fair Court elections will 
be held Thursday in the Student 
Union from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., ac- 
cording to Henry Burns, chair- 
man of the elections board. 

A committee composed of SGA 
officials, AWS and AMS repre- 
sentatives will meet this weekend 
to determine the nominees. Ac- 
cording to Burns, a minimum of 
18 women will be placed on the 
ballot. 

Nominees were chosen in dorm- 
itory elections held recently. Nine 
girls will be elected to the court. 
The girl polling the most votes 
will be declared State Fair Queen 
for the Tech-NSC game. 

Burns urges all students to vote 
in the selection of the court who 
will represent the college Tech 
weekend. 

Chorale Sings 
For Governor 

Featured last Sunday at the 
third Annual "Governor's Gospel 
Sing" was the college's chorale, 
the only group of its kind invited 
by Governor John McKeithen to 
participate in the Gospel Sing on 
the lawn of the exective mansion 
in Baton Rouge. 

The chorale, composed of 32 
selected members from the col- 
lege choir, presented three mu- 
sical selections; Handel's "Hall- 
eluiah Chorus," "Morning Trum- 
pet," and "America the Beauti- 
ful." Directing the choral group 
was John R. LeBlanc, choral and 
music instructor. 

The chorale was one of several 
singing groups from throughout 
the state performing Sunday be- 
fore an estumated of 50,000. 
Following the Gosuel Sing, all 
performers and spectators were 
guests of the Governor for a 
"Louisiana — style" barbecue. 

Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

One school board representa- 
tive and two industrial company 
executives will interview students 
next week in the college place- 
ment office, SU Room 223. 

All day Monday, Calcasieu Par- 
ish School Board representative 
will see seniors interested in 
teaching in the Lake Charles 
area in the spring semester and 
in the fall of 1968. 

An Arthur Anderson Co. ex- 
ective is scheduled to interview 
accounting majors on Tuesday 
and E. J. Rathke of Chevron Oil 
will also see accounting majors 
on Oct. 16. 

Anyone wishing to schedule an 
interview with the school or com- 
pany representatives should con- 
tact the placement office, phone 
357-5621 or 357-5622. 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 



Page 5 



Burns To Lead 




Associated Men Start 
Expanded Activities 



Women's Residence Halls Name Dorm 
Officials; All To Serve With AWS 



All women's residence halls on 
campus have elected their dorm- 
itory officials for this school year. 
These officers will automatically 
serve on the Greater AWS Coun- 
cil and handle various dormitory 
activities. 

Each dorm selected a president, 
vice-president, secretary, treasur- 
er, social chairman and publicity 
chairman. In some dorms, how- 
ever, two publicity chairmen were 
named. 

The newly-elected officials are 
respectively: 

Agnes Morris — Suzanne Kinn,e- 
brew, president; Thea Rosa- 
mano, vice-president; Sharon 
Taylor, secretary; Cathy Davis, 
social chairman; and Delores 
Sparks, publicity chairman. 

West Caddo — Eloise Arnold, Cor- 
liss Reeves, Emilie Oates, Nor- 
ma Broussard, and Kay Mann- 
ing. 

West Sabine — Jennifer Garrett, 
Janis Lowe, Charlene Wheeler, 
Mary Jane Peacher and Emily 
Mae Rolfs. 

East Sabine — Patricia Jones, Peg- 
gy Carriere, Martha Cathey, 
Chris Rede, and Connie Jones. 

East Caddo — Pat Fargo, Diane 
Crosby, Alex Harris, Susan 
Murrell, Nancy Wise and Kathy 
Callahan. 

Audubon — Connie Poya, Sherry 
Strickland, Sherry Seilhan, Bar- 
bara Spruill, and Nancy Houtz. 

East Varnado — R e n e Gibson, 
Jean Karnes, Mary Sue Greer. 
Jo Walker, Ann Cifreo, and 
Paula Melton. 

South Sabine — Ginger Foshee, 



Peggy McDaniel, Margie Pad- 
ula, Pattye Robinson, and Sha- 
ron Parker. 

West Varnado — Janet Churchman, 
Phyllis Crowe, Rita William- 
son, Regina Guidroz, and Nor- 
ma Oliver. 

Carondelet — Donna Westenbarg- 
er, Sandy Hoffman, Linda Gau- 
thier, Faye Davis, and Annie 
Jo Redding. 

North Sabine — Donna Lindsey, 



On this campus where every- 
one from the administration to 
the football team seems to be 
buzzing with unheard of activity, 
the Associated Men's Students 
organization headed by Henry- 
Burns finds itself beginning to 
work on a new and vastly ex- 
panded program. 

In past times, the AMS has been 
a virtually defunct group elected 
merely to be photographed for 
the Potpourri. Burns, however, 
initiating the enforcement of a 
new constitution drawn up by 
Jere Daye, past president, has 
organized committees to begin 
work on the new programs. 

According to Burns, this year 
the AMS hopes to become truly 
the voice of the opinions of the 
male students on campus. 
Through this council of dormitory 
representatives, individuals may 
be assured of a voice in student 
government. 

Among the activities in store 
for this school year are decora- 
tions and greeting for parents 
at Mom and Dad's Day, dormitory 
decorations for Homecoming, and 
Christmas decorations. 

Membership dues for the As- 
sociated Men's Students were 
paid by every male dormitory 
resident as he received his room. 
More than half of these dues 
have been put into a fund for 

Nancy Lyons, Carolyn Ehrhart, 
Connie Dixon, and Karen Fitz. 
Louisiana — Susan Flash, Anne 
Mathews, Margie Hoelz, Cindy 
Thomas, Nancy Martin, and 
Cheryl Shaub. 




Football 
Mums 

for Mom and Dad's Day 



CALL 



The Flower Nook 

120 Amulet Phone 352-2690 

We Deliver To All Dorms 



dormitory improvements. 

A large portion of the remain- 
der of the cash has been dedi- 
cated to the organization of a 
Freshman tutoring program. Re- 
search into the feasability of a 
Freshman tutoring program is 
being headed by Jerry Moomau. 

Burns stated that this and other 
programs would be operated in 
the context of an all-round pro- 
gram designed to promote in co- 
operation with the administration 
any program which would con- 
cern itself with the welfare of 
the male student on campus. 

The officers have already log- 

The officers who have already 
logged many hours backing up 
the new constitution with action 
are; Henry Burns, president; 
Skippy Newton, vice-president; 
James Jeansonne, secretary; and 
Tony Ward, treasurer. 

According to Burns, every man 
residing on the campus is encour- 
aged to take an active part in the 
AMS by taking any suggestions 
he might have to his AMS rep- 
resentative and possibly taking 
part in the actual programs by 
offering his services on one of 
the various committees. 

Car Wash Scheduled 

A car wash, sponsored by the 
Geological Society, has been sche- 
duled for tomorrow from 8 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. at Cobb's Esso, on the 
corner of Third and Texas Sts. 
Cost for the car wash will be 
$1.50 per car. 



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Next to Warren's Market 



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We run a Special after each 
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New Psycedilic Soda 

Candle light dining after 7 p.m. 



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Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 6, 1967 




QUARTERBACK DON GU1DRY of Chwrch Point will lead the un- 
beaten Demons against Pensacola Navy tomorrow night in Demon 
Stadium. Guidry has carried the ball 30 times for a total of 116 yard, 
and has attempted 15 passes and completed 7. Kickoff time is set for 
7:30 p.m. 



From. Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 



Three Down ... Six to Go 

After the final horn had sounded over Demon Stadium's 
gridiron last Saturday, the Purple and White gladiators had 
beaten the Indians of Northeast State by the score of 21-14 in 
one of the most hectic, nerve-racking football games that 
anyone could possibly conceive. For pure suspense and un- 
relenting drama it would be impossible to top the mighty 
affair. It had been billed almost everywhere in local circles 
as the "Game of the Year," and certainly it did not fail to 
live-up to that banner in anybody's eyes. 

The game turned-out to be more of a defensive contest 
than an offensive one. The explosive Demons had an amazing 
arsenal of attack weapons to utilize, but eventually they stuck 
to running option plays and play-action passes to rack-up 
their final total. The Demons thoroughly out-played North- 
east in the statistics department. The Indians only earned 
one of their touchdowns on a sustained drive in the second 
half. The first was a gift of sorts when George Green, punting 
from his own end zone, fumbled the snap-back, and could 
only get back to the ten yard line. From there, NLSC scored 
in three plays. 

Donald Guidry directed the Demons to a long, time con- 
suming drive in the waning moments of the game. Twice 
Coach Glenn Gossett ordered fourth down attempts needing 
short-yardage for a first, when failure to pick up the needed 
yardage would have given Northeast excellent field position, 
and plenty of time to get on the score-board. But the Demons, 
playing like true champions that they are, made both of them, 
and thereby allowed the drive to continue. Guidry surely 
would have led them to pay dirt again, but Kenny Callens 
fumbled at the two, and an Indian recovered giving the 
Monroe-based team its one last chance. Dick Concilio took 
that back with an interception, the offensive team lined-up, 
Guidry took the snap and sat-down on the turf, and the tough- 
est victory to date, and perhaps the toughest test they will 
battle this season was history. 

Congratulations to the players and the coaches on a well- 
(See From Down Under, page 7) 



Sixth- Ranked Demons 
Scalp Indians 21 -14 



By Bobby Ardoin 

Relying mainly on the superb 
running of halfback Vic Nyvall 
and quarterback Don Guidry, the 
sixth-ranked Demons eluded what 
may prove to be their biggest ob- 
stacle of the season by sweeping 
past Northeast's Indians 21-14 in 
Demon Stadium Saturday night. 

Nyvall led the Demon rushing 
onslaught with a total of 124 
yards in 15 attempts and one 
touchdown, while Guidry, a jun- 
ior signal caller from Church 
Point scampered for a six-pointer 
and 67 total yards. 

Saturday night's decision over 
the Tribe extended the Demons 
three year winning streak to 13, 
equaling a school record for most 
consecutive wins, and also allow- 
ed them to become odds-on fav- 
orite to capture another GSC 
championship. 

Although many experts con- 
sidered the Northeast defense to 
be almost impregnable, the well- 
balanced Demon offensive attack 
sliced through the Tribe defen- 
sive wall for 179 yards on the 
ground, and another 60 markers 
by passing. 

On the other hand, the Demon 
defensive unit turned in its most 
sparkling performance of the sea- 
son by holding the well-respected 
Indian attack to 85 yards on the 
ground and 68 via the air. 

Another predominant aspect of 
the Demon's conference win was 
the excellent field position they 
enjoyed throughout the night. 
Time after time, they were able 
to put their opponent's backs to 
wall, thanks to the superior punt- 
ing of Shelly Dickie and fresh- 
man halfback George Green of 
New Orleans. 

Throughout the first quarter, 
both teams marched up and down 
the field unable to put together 
any scoring drive worthy of 
mention. 

However, late in the first quar- 
ter, the Demon scoring machine 
swung into action after taking 
possession of the ball on the 
Tribe 48 after a fourth down 
punt. 

On a second and seven situa- 
tion, quarterback Malcolm Lewis 
rifled a pass to Jerry Mott that 
was good for 11 yards and a first 
down. After testing the strength 
of the Tribe defensive line with 
three running plays down to the 
14, Lewis rared back on the next 
one and fired a seven-yard aerial 
strike to Mott for the six-pointer 
with one minute remaining in the 
period. 

The Northeast offense could 
not mount a drive after the kick- 
off, and called in punter Al Miller 
to boot the ball to the Demon 20. 
A clipping penalty on the play 
forced the Purple and White back 
to their own 10. 

The suddenly alert Tribe de- 
fense thwarted the Demon run- 
ning game by allowing them only 
five yards in three plays. George 
Green dropped back to punt on 
fourth down, but bobbled the 
snap and was hauled to the 
ground on the 10 while attempt- 
ing to run it out. 

Quarterback Steve Mansur 
handed to scatback Joe Profit 
for three, and fullback Bobby 
Scafidel followed with six more 
yards on the next play to advance 
the ball to the one. Mansur then 
pitched the pigskin to Profit who 
shook off three tacklers on a 
sweep around right end for the 
tally. Placement specialist Clark 
Blake split the uprights with the 
kick to deadlock the score at 7-7. 

After failing to mount a sub- 
stantial drive following the sec- 
ond half kickoff, the Indians were 
forced into a fourth down kicking 
situation. 

Miller booted the ball to Nyvall 
who gathered it in on the 19 and 
searched for daylight behind a 
wall of blockers. Once out into 



the clear, Nyvall danced and 
faked his way down the middle 
of the field for 81 yards nad 
another Demon score. Lewis 
came in to boot the PAT, and the 
Demons led 14-7 with only three 
minutes gone in the half. 

The Tribe came storming back 
after the kickoff with sophomore 
Terry Reisig taking over the sig- 
nal calling chores. Reisig led the 
surging Indians to the Demon 26 
before losing the ball on downs. 

Quarterback Guidry entered the 
game, and led the Demons down 
the field by throwing aerial com- 
pletions to split end Steve Gas- 
pard and handing off to halfback 
Kenny Callens who brought the 
ball down to the Tribe one on a 
third down situation. 

On the next play, Guidry scoot- 
ed around left tackle and slid 
into the end zone for the score. 
Lewis kicked the PAT, and the 
Demons led 21-7. 

Not to be outdone, the Tribe 
scrambled for their lives in a 
desperate attempt to add points 
to the scoreboard. 

Traveling on the passing arm 
of Reisig and the runs of Profit 
(See Demons, page 7) 



Clayton Honored 
By Century Club 

Jack Clayton, former football 
coach of Northwestern State Col- 
lege, was named an award winner 
recently by the Sports Trail Cen- 
tury Club, an organization spon- 
sored by the Bike Division of 
the Kendall Company, to foster 
community recognition of the 
contributions made by dedicated 
athletic coaches throughout the 
United States. 

The coach was made an hon- 
orary member of the Century 
Club for his record of 100 vic- 
tories in football. 

The club is an honorary group 
open to all college and high 
school coaches whose teams have 
won 100 or more contests in any 
sport. It was originated some 20 
years ago by high school coach 
William Mattei of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, who asked that Sports 
Trail honor outstanding coaches 
"because their efforts result in 
good citizens." 

"Successful coaching of athle- 
tic teams develops in young men 
a strong competitive spirit, an 
abiding appreciation of fair play 
and a sense of responsibilty," 
said R. H. Neilson, director of 
the club and a Bike executive. 
"The characteristics that make a 
winning team are the same ones 
that build better citizenship." 



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Friday, October 6, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



From Down Under— 

deserved, decisive win. This victory incidently, should boost 
our national prestige in the small-college polls. 

Frats Frenzidly Frolic at Fracas 

Overall, the spirit of the Demon fans in general perked- 
up a little in comparison with the previous two weeks, but the 
fraternity and sorority sections get a tip of the hat from this 
column for their spirit displayed at the extremely important 
game. Repeatedly these groups made good use of their vocal 
cords in rollicking style. Every good play made by the De- 
mons, whether offensively or defensively, brought a rousing 
round of cheers from the frat areas. The great Demon march- 
ing band was barely outdone though in the noise department, 
as they kicked-up quite a storm of commotion of their own. 

Spectator spirit does count, as evidensed by Northeast's 
efforts to whip their fans into a frenzy for the game. Its of- 
ficial student publication, the Pow Wow, featured a front 
page layout on the game depicting an Indian stepping on a 
Demon who was yelling "Uncle." They described Northwest- 
ern as "harmless," and made a big thing about being in that 
group going to NSC for the "LSD-in" (Let's Stomp Demons). 
Three busloads of people and an automobile caravan found 
their way to Natchitoches. For this reason I believe NLSC 
played above its potential and managed to keep the score 
close. Had it not been for a couple of costly fumbles the final 
tally could well have been 28-7, but that's conjecture, and we 
won convincingly. 

Number 13 Not Unlucky 

The win stretched the Demons undefeated string to 13 
games over a three season span, which tied the school's all- 
time winning streak. Number 14 should come tomorrow night 
against the unpredictable Pensacola Navy Goshawks. If their 
ex-All American and Heisman Trophy winner Roger Staubach 
is well and able, it could be a rough workout for the Demon 
aerial defenses. 

Spirit! Spirit! Spirits!? 

All Demon fans are reminded to keep up the yelling 
and cheering to spur our team on. They are a great football 
squad, capable of greater things, and deserving of all the 
accolades heaped upon them. They've put us on the national 
football map, and are going to keep us there. Spirit is easy 
to come by. We personally surveyed the remains of Demon 
Stadium on Sunday morning, and found more than 50 empty 
bottles of various "spirits" in assorted sizes. With all of that 
juice flowing at our games, we should be able to create our 
own little "Mardi Gras." 

"Down Under" Goes Down Under 

Needless to say, this column "took it on the chin" so to 
speak as far as last week's predictions went. Besides the big 
one, we only succeded in picking Tulane over North Carolina. 
We attempted to turn the predicting aspects of "From Down 
Under" over to another staff member in view of our present 
guessing average of .357 for the season, but, no one else 
wanted the privilege, so here we go again. 

Gulf States Conference Action 

Northwestern 45, Pensacola 17. (Pensacola may not get away 
with this many if Staubach still isn't healthy. Demons may 
not get 45 if they aren't mentally ready.) 
Northeast 21, Chattanooga 10. (Indians rebound at Chatta- 
nooga's expense.) 

La. Tech 17, Southwestern 13. (It's Tech's homecoming, and 
the Bulldogs should rise to the occasion.) 
McNeese 13, Arlington 12. (Cowboys try a little harder against 
third Texas foe.) 

Southeastern 24, Trinity 23. (Southeastern beats Trinity for 
the first time in four tries because Lions at home.) 

Elsewhere In Louisiana 
LSU 14, Florida 10. (Tigers bid for top ten.) 
Miami 20, Tulane 10. (Hurricane whips Wave.) 
Livingston 17, La. College 0. (Another long evening for wild- 
cats.) 

This Week's Longshot 
New York 27, New Orleans 13. (No comment.) 



Demons— 



(Continued from page 6) 
and Scafidel, the Tribe marched 
down to the Demon five in nine 
Plays. At this point Reisig took 
the snap from center and rolled 
around tackle for the score. 

The alert Indian defense re- 
covered a Demon fumble in the 
fading minutes and were threat- 
ening another score when a stray 
Reisig pass landed in the arms of 
Di ck Concilo on the 35 as time 
ra n out in the game. 

By beating the Tribe, the De- 
mons passed what was consider- 
ed by many as their "biggest test 
°£ the season," and also establish- 
ed themselves as the team to beat 
f or the GSC title. 

They face another stern assign- 
ment tomorrow night when they 
* a ce former Heisman Trophy win- 
ner Roger Staubach and his Pen- 
sacola Navy teammates in Demon 
Radium. Kickoff time is set for 
7:30. 



Bowling League 
To Form Teams 

Although touch football pres- 
ently dominates the spotlight on 
the Intramural sports scene, 
bowling will soon enter into 
prominence with the league 
games beginning Oct. 23, accord- 
ing to Roy Gentry, intramural 
director. 

This year's competition will be 
carried on in a league basis in- 
stead of the usual one-day events 
held in previous years. 

Each team will consist of six 
members, with two of these de- 
signated as alternates. 

Anyone interested in partici- 
pating in league action should 
enter their team roster at the 
Intramural Office in the Men's 
Gym as soon as possible. 



'Jolly' Roger To Lead 
Assault On Demons 



By John Keppel 

The Pensacola Navy Goshawks 
come calling on the rough and 
tumble Demons tomorrow in what 
could turn out to be a rather 
interesting football contest. Ex- 
pected to lead the charge against 
the mighty Purple and White is 
none other than the "Jolly Roger" 
himself, Roger Staubach, the 
Heisman Trophy winner of 1963, 
which is awarded to the nation's 
most outstanding collegiate foot- 
ball player each year. 

The Goshawks can boast of no 
returning letterman because each 
year they must undergo a com- 
plete turnover in personnel. 
However, six members of the 1966 
Naval Academy team are present, 
as are a numerous assortment of 
ex-collegians from such power- 
house pigskin schools as Ala- 
bama, Georgia, USC, Michigan 
State, Houston, Notre Dame and 
other major universities. 

Two weeks ago, Staubach guid- 



their passing game as much this 
year as was expected of them. 
Quarterbacks Don Guidry and 
Malcom Lewis have not had to 
utelize their aerial offense since 
the running game has been click- 
ing so effectively. 

The Purple Devil's defense has 
also been outstanding, particu- 
larly the play of all-GSC perform- 
ers Gerald Malley, at middle 
guard, and end David Lovich. 
Other defensive stalwarts include 
linebacker Ronnie Whatley, tackle 
Mike Creel, end Randy Tate and 
defensive backs Dick Concilio, 
David Smith, John Boogaerts and 
Sammy Clifton. 



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ROGER STAUBACH, 1963 Heis- 
man Trophy winner, will lead his 
Pensacola Navy teammates a- 
gainst the powerful Demon grid- 
iron crew tomorrow night in 
Demon Stadium. Staubach still 
holds seven career records at 
Navy. 

ed the Navy squad to a 14-7 vic- 
tory over McNeese State. He suf- 
fered an ankle injury in that one, 
and had to miss last week's en- 
counter against Southwestern, 
which the Ragin Cajuns won 13-3. 
That left the "Flyers" with a sea- 
son slate of 2-2. 

Rushers Ready to Rack 

The Demon's devastating 
ground attack has already racked- 
up an amazing 861 yards in three 
games. Halfbacks Vic Nyvall, 
Kenny Callens and fullback Barry 
Fresh have led the assult. They 
might find that running room 
comes at more of a premium 
against their formidable oppon- 
ents. 

The Demons have not relied on 



when you call home by phone 

Students in the two new dormi- 
tories, Sabine Hall and Rapides Hall, 
can call home even easier with their 
new Centrax system. All students 
can take advantage of the lowest 
rates, with savings up to 35%, by 
calling home station-to-station 
rather than person-to-person. 



REMEMBER NIGHT RATES ARE IN EFFECT MONDAY 
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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 6, 1967 



'Picture of Progress' Is Theme 
For '67 Homecoming, Oct. 28 



Geologists Tour Local Area Today 



"NSC— A Picture of Progress" 
will be the theme for this year's 
Homecoming celebration sched- 
uled for the weekend of Oct. 28. 

The theme will emphasize the 
progress of the college in differ- 
ent phases such as enrollment, 
new buildings, and departmental 
changes. 

Again this year, there will be 
no homecoming parade but each 
dormitory, fraternity and sorority 
will create homecoming displays 
carrying out the chosen theme. 

Homecoming festivities will 
both precede and follow the non- 
conference NSC-Troy State foot- 
ball game scheduled for 2:30 p.m. 
Saturday, Oct. 28. 

Harrel C. Hale, secretary of the 
Alumni Association and Home- 
coming Chairman, has announced 
that the registration headquarters 
will be located in the Student 
Union. 

Further details of Homecoming 
will be released at a later date. 

Demons 
Number 5 
In the Nation 

(A.P.) 

Mom and Dad 

(Continued from page 1) 

Pi Kappa Phi will sponsor open 
house from 1:30 p.m. to game 
time; Kappa Alpha will greet 
from 3 to 6 p.m.; the Sigma Tau 
Gamma house will be open from 
2 to 5 p.m. Refreshments will be 
served at all of these places. 

The fraternities Kappa Sigma 
and Tau Kappa Epsilon are mak- 
ing signs to welcome NSC stu- 
dents. 

Mom and Dad's Day is being 
sponsored jointly by Phi Eta 
Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta, 
two honorary freshmen organiza- 
tions, and the Associated Women 
Students. Members of the two 
honor groups will serve as ushers 
at tomorrow night's game for the 
Moms and Dads and AWS mem- 
bers will welcome parents to the 
dormitories during the two hour 
open house in all women's and 
men's residence halls tomorrow 
afternoon. 




DON GU1DRY (16) slices through the Northeast defensive secondary 
for a substantial gain in the first quarter of Saturday night's game. 
Attempting to stop Guidry is Tribe defensive halfback Ron Bovdreaux 
(41). Demon players recognizable are Barry Fresh (37), and Shelly 
Dickie (89). 



IA Club Plans 
Fall Activities 

Members of the Industrial Arts 
Club discussed plans for a future 
fund raising project last week 
during the organization's first 
meeting of the fall semester. 

During the meeting, the club's 
newly-elected officers were intro- 
duced to the organization's mem- 
bers. Serving as IA officials for 
1967-68 are Jimmy McCrory, 
president; Tommy Jackson, vice- 
president; Ralph Stapleton, sec- 
retary; Tim Ivey, treasurer; Will 
Arceneaux, publicity agent. 

Membership in the IA Club is 
open to all majors and minors in 
the field of industrial arts, in- 
dustrial technology, and indus- 
trial arts education. 



SGA 



(Continued from page 1) 
Men's Representative George 
Gray that the matter be referred 
to the Student Union Board with 
an affirmative recommendation 
from the SGA. 

A re-vote on the cheerleader 
amendment came after Parlia- 
mentarian Larry McCollum dis- 
covered the invalidity of last 
week's approval of the measure. 
An amendment to the original 
amendment was proposed by 
Junior President Charles Skin- 
ner, who favored student choice 
of the yell leaders, elected from 
a group of screened finalists. His 
motion failed by a narrow margin 
of 10 to eight, and the original 
motion, authored by Maxwell, 
passed with the addition of spring 
semester as its effective date. 




Phone 352-3816 



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Members of the NSC Geological 
Society will attend a field trip this 
week on the geology of Natchi- 
toches Parish. The trip, which is 
sponsored by the Shreveport Ge- 
ological Society, will be conducted 
today and tomorrow. 

The purpose of the trip is to 
familiarize area geologists with 



the rock structure and fossils of 
the parish. In addition the group 
will see new refining procedures 
at the Placid Oil Refinery near 
Black Lake. The commentator will 
be Dr. Harold V. Anderson of LSU 
who has been studying the ge- 
ology of this area for many years. 



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They've been around for 13 
years, have sold 75 million-plus 
recordings, and were twice voted 
"The World's Most Outstanding 
Vocal Group." 

They're the Platters, and they'll 
be appearing in concert in the 
Coliseum Wednesday at 8 p.m. 

The Platters, on an annual tour 
of the nation's colleges and uni- 
versities, will be the second at- 
traction in the Student Govern- 
ment Association's fall Student 
Entertainment Series. 

Also scheduled are Simon and 
Garfunkel, Nov. 14, and the 
Serendipity singers, Dec. 2. 

The Platters, says the enter- 
tainment news-magazine ..The 



Scene, are in even more demand 
for concerts today than when they 
were making such songs as "The 
Great Pretender," "Twilight 
Time," "Only You" and "Smoke 
Gets in Your Eyes," great hits of 
the past decade. 

Besides the group's extensive 
appearances both here and abroad 
they have countless television 
shows to their credit and have ap- 
peared in six movies. 

Tickets for the Wednesday con- 
cert, as well as for the last two 
entertainment series presenta- 
tions, are available now at the 
Student Government office in the 
Union for both students and the 
general public. 



Gecm, Riddle Will 
Face Run-off For 
Frosh President 

Two freshmen presiden- 
tial candidates edged out 
eight others Tuesday to gain 
a place on the ballot next 
week in the Freshmen class 
officer run-off election. 

Macon Gean and Garland Riddle 
both earned over a hundred votes 
in the all-freshmen election Tues- 
day to join nine other frosh of- 
ficer hopefuls in the run-offs 
planned for this Tuesday. 

An energetic pre-election rally 
Monday night gave hopes of an 
interesting freshman election but 
Tuesday's dismal voter turn-out 
soon disappointed student govern- 
ment officials. Of the college's 
1800 registered freshmen, only 
518 went to the polls to elect 
class officers. 

Of the 518 votes cast, Gean 
earned 161 to gain the lead in a 
ten man presidential race while 
Riddle was a close second with 
138 votes. 

In the vice-presidential cam- 
paign, three of the nine candi- 
dates won berths on the run-off 
ballots when the election results 
were tallied. Marsha Bella with 
204 votes will face Janet Church- 
man and David Precht, who both 
netted 98 votes in Tuesday's elec- 
tion. 

In the Men's representative 
run-off are Merrill D. Dodd, Jr., 
who was second in the contest 
with 76 candidate votes and 
Gregg B. Kevil who led the race 
with 131 votes. 

Fran Arnona and Peggy Car- 
riere will vie for the Women's 
Representative post in the run- 
off. Miss Arnona netted 81 votes 
while Miss Carriere lead the field 
of five candidates with 82 votes. 

The SGA-sponsored run-off has 
been set for Tuesday from 8 a.m. 
to 7 p.m., according to Henry 
Burns, chairman of the SGA's 
election committee. 

Immediately following the run- 
off, the new elected Frosh offi- 
cers will be seated as voting mem- 
bers of the SGA. 

All-College 
Assembly 

Bill Sands, noted writer and 
lecturer on Rehabilitation, will 
be the all-college assembly 
speaker Tuesday morning at 
H o'clock in the Fins Arts 
Auditorium. 

An ex-convict. Sands, who is 
fow a successful businessman, 
lectures throughout the nation 
or > juvenile delinquincy, prison 
reform and rehabilitation. He 
has also appeared on "The 
Johnny Carson Show," and 
'The Joey Bishop Show." 

All classes will be dismissed 
at 11 o'clock Tuesday for stu- 
dents to attend the assemdly. 




urrent 



s 



auce 



Vol. LVI— No. 8 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Friday, October 14, 1967 



Students Select State Fair Queen, Court 
As Tech Game Preparations Get Underway 



Paula Wright, a senior 
from Baton Rouge, was elect- 
ed Thursday by popular stu- 
dent vote to reign as the col- 
lege's 1967 State Fair Queen. 

Miss Wright and Louisiana 
Tech's fair queen will be 
crowned Oct. 21 in pre-game 
ceremonies before the NSC- 
Tech game at State Fair Sta- 
dium in Shreveport. 

Also elected yesterday were 
eight coeds who will complete 
the college's fair court. Chosen 
by the students from a field of 
16 nominees were Linda Craft, 
Ginger Foshee, Sue Peterson, 
Marsha Bella, Martha Minvielle, 
Jan Holland, Branda Wilson and 
Cheryl Terry. 

Those nominated but not win- 
ning a seat on the queen's court 
were Jackie Dykes, Candace 
Faust, Charlotte Herron, Lynda 
Lawrence, Janice Matthews, Pam 
Scott and Charleen Wheeler. 

Nominations for the court 
were made initially in the dorms 
and those nominated were nar- 
rowed to court members by yes- 
terday's election which was organ- 
ized by Henry L. Burns, chair- 
man of the SGA's election board. 

Miss Wright and her court of 
eight NSC beauties will be feted 
with a reception hosted by the 
Tech and NSC SGA's in Shreve- 
port prior to the annual Demon- 
Bulldog parade. 

In the parade, members of both 
college courts will be featured 
and chauffered in convertibles 
driven by SGA members from 
both schools. 



Minutes before the kick-off for 
the annual Demon-Bulldog classic, 
both the NSC and Tech fair 
court will be presented to the 
thousands of fans expected to be 
on hand for the Oct. 21 game. 

Mike Frazier 
Killed Sunday 
In Car Crash 

Michael Cole Frazier, 18-year- 
old freshman from Winnfield, was 
killed instantly Sunday morning 
when the car he was driving col- 
lided head-on into a truck near 
Armistead Community on U.S. 
Hwy. 1. 

The driver of the truck was al- 
so critically injured in the crash, 
according to police reports. 

The accident occurred, said 
State Police, when Frazier appar- 
ently went to sleep at the wheel 
of his car as it moved into the 
path of the on-coming truck. 

The impact of the crash, ac- 
cording to the Red River deputy 
sheriff, crumpled the car so badly 
into the front of the truck that 
none of the auto's four wheels 
were touching the pavement. 

Funeral services for the Winn- 
field High School graduate were 
conducted Monday at Laurel 
Heights Baptist Church in Winn- 
field and burial was in Winn- 
field's Garden Oakes Memory 
Cemetery. . 

Frazier is survived by his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Frazier 
of Winnfield and two sisters. 



Following the pre-game pres- 
entation ceremony, the court will 
view the bout between the De- 
mons and the "soon-to-be" man- 
gled Bulldogs from choice seats 
on the sidelines, according to 
SGA member Gaylon Landry, 
who heads the Stat Fair Commit- 
tee. 

Tech Week 

Excitement is already build- 
ing up for the Tech game and by 
the time Miss Wright is crowned 
and the Demons go on the field 
Oct. 21, the student body should 
be bursting with enthusiasm and 
school spirit. 

In preparation for next week's 
game, the SGA's school spirit 
committee, headed by Joe Ger- 
many, has planned various ac- 
tivities each night of the week 
to help boost school spirit. 



Among the scheduled events 
are The Platters in concert Wed- 
nesday night at 8 p.m in the 
coliseum and a special burn-the- 
bulldog bonfire climaxed by an 
all-college dance Thursday night 
from 8 to 12 p.m. Playing at the 
dance, states Bill Fowler, SGA 
vice-president, will be the 
"Excuses" from Monroe. 

Pep rallies, sponsored by var- 
ious organizations such as social 
fraternities and sororities, Blue 
Key, Purple Jackets and the Cir- 
cle K, are on the "spirit" agenda 
for Monday and Tuesday nights. 

Student migration from NSC 
to Shreveport is expected to be- 
gin late Friday afternoon and 
continue through Saturday as 
almost the entire student body 
flocks to Shreveport for the 
game. 



Homecoming Queen 
Selected By N N' Club 



Martha Minvielle, a junior 
Home Economics Education ma- 
jor from Abbeville, has been se- 
lected Queen of the 1967 Home- 
coming Court. 

Miss Minvielle was chosen this 
week in a special election by 
members of the "N" Club. She 
will reign over the pre-game acti- 
vities beginning at 2:10 p.m. be- 
fore the NSC-Troy football game 
Oct. 28. 

The Queen and her court will 
be escorted by members of the 
athletic club during the Home- 
coming ceremonies. 

Members of the court include 
Allyson McLaurin of Mansfield, 
Anna Dell Creel of Natchitoches, 
Suzanne Chabreck of Lacombe, 



Joan Mills of Baton Rouge, Rita 
Johnston of Alexandria, Diane 
Gilbert of El Dorado, Ark., Louise 
Loupe of New Roads, Carol Cook 
of Many, Tenita Fort of Natchi- 
toches, Sada Martin of Mora, and 
Pam Dunn of Shreveport. 

"N" Club escorts for the 11 
maids are Bob Herrmann, Neal 
Prather, Terry Alario, David 
Clark, Myer Irby, Neal Simmons, 
Bill Ragland, Otis Faust, Jim 
Peffer, Skeeter Henry, and James 
Wyatt. Queen Martha will be es- 
corted by John Hall. 

The Queen is elected by mem- 
bers of the "N" Club and the 
court is chosen by the senior 
members of the Demon football 
squad. 




MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE? Assistant to the Director Peggy 
Beasley of New Orleans and leading man Byron Nail of Metairie talk 
about aspects of production involved in the three-act comedy noio 
playing in the Little Theatre. Curtain time is 8 p.m. for tonight's 
closing performance of "More Than Meets The Eye." (See review on 
page five.) This first production of the fall College Theatre Season 
will be followed Nov. 16-17 by Jean Giraudoux's classical farce, 
"Amphitryon 38." 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 14, 1967 



From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 



No. 14 



An All-time Record 



Last week's 28-16 victory over the unexpectedly tough 
Pensacola Navy Goshawks was the 14th consecutive victory 
stretching back to the final game of the 1965 season. The 
conquest established an all-time record for a Demon football 
squad. The win was yet another milestone in the glittering 
success story of our great gridiron crews during the last 
year and a half. What more they can accomplish in their 
football endeavors is anyone's guess. We think quite a lot 
more . . . "if." 

The "if" in question is whether or not the Demons will 
fall prey to the inherent danger that all winning teams in- 
variably must face, and that is an invincibility complex. In 
simpler words, subconscious belief in the players' minds 
that they cannot lose no matter how badly they play. This 
factor will definitely come into the spotlight in our next 
five games. 



Pensacola 



A Shallow Victory? 



Although its true we did win, from our vantage point 
it appeared as if the Demons just weren't ready to play their 
best brand of football. This could be the result of many 
opposing factors. To be specific, the Demons had to have 
their physical machine sharply honed, and their mental 
frames of mind at an emotional peak for the top effort 
which they turned in against Northeast. This proved what 
everybody had more or less conceded, that the Demons could 
handle anyone if they wanted to. The second and third con- 
tributing elements were the fact that they were going to 
play Pensacola in their next game, a team which they had 
thrashed the year before, and could only boast of one asset, 
Roger Staubach, and it was not certain that he could play, 
which eventually he didn't. Of course the last factor was over- 
looking the Goshawks for our arch-rivals, La. Tech. Indeed, at 
the Pensacola pep rally, the cheerleaders struck-up the "Let's 
Wreck Tech" chant as the bonfire embers flickered out. There 
it was Thursday, more than two weeks from State Fair, and no 
one seemed to care that we had a game in between. 

Spirit Sags Significantly 

And then it was Saturday night in Demon Stadium. The 
squad came out before a three-fourths filled stadium, and 
only a token round of applause and cheers trickled forth 
from the "fans." That's a rather strange attitude, unless per- 
haps the invincibility complex has carried over to the spec- 
tators too, which would make things worse. Nevertheless, it 
would be hard to distinguish the pressbox side of the stadium 
and the crowds it contained, from the reserved tennis galler- 
ies that traditionally make no sound until the affair is over. 
As a matter of fact, we believe that tennis fans probably cheer 
more. Again though, the fraternity and band sections led the 
rabble-rousing corps in support of our cheerleaders, who have 
thoroughly mastered the art of throwing the female members 
of the group all around the track, although their vociferous 
activities seem to be limited in a sense. Perhaps they should 
put their fine gymnastics abilities to better use, surely Coach 
Vega of the gymnastics team would welcome them. 

State Fair and Tech .... A Demon Waterloo? 

At first glance, the above subhead may seem ridiculous 
and unfounded. But a closer scrutiny of the situation reveals 
some intriguing yet truthful (however painful) aspects of the 
annual grudge game. Perhaps the most outstanding of them is 
the all-time series record between the arch enemies. Unfor- 
tunately, Tech holds a commanding lead of 33 wins and 14 
losses since the ancient affair began in 1909. There have been 
only four ties. In the past 37 years, the Demons have only 
managed to put back to back victories together against the 
Bulldogs twice, the last time coming in 1961 and'62. 

For further evidence that the old adage that goes "You 
can throw out the record books for this one" can certainly be 
applied here, one needs only to reflect back on the ill-fated 
1965 season. The Demons had roared-off to a 4-0 slate, while 
the Bulldogs were in the throes of a 0-4 worksheet. However, 
when the scoreboard at State Fair Stadium had stopped blink- 
(See From Down Under, Page 7) 



Demons Down The Goshawks 
For 14th Straight Victory 



Led by the elusive running of 
halfback Alywn Phillips, the 
sixth-ranked Demons became 
owners of the longest winning 
streak in school history Saturday 
night as they slipped past the 
surprisingly stubborn Pensacola 
Navy Goshawks 28-16. 

This win marked the 14th 
straight victory for the Demons 
over a three year span, and also 
erased a 27 year-old mark set by 
the 1940 Demon eleven. 

Phillips, a product of Lee High 
of Baton Rouge, scored twice dur- 
ing the night's gridiron battle 
reaching paydirt on a 13-yard 
pass reception in the second quar- 
ter, and on an 8-yard scoring 
jaunt in the final period. 

A strong defensive effort was 
required by the Demons to se- 
cure the victory, as they had to 
fight off constant enemy pene- 
trations, and halt scoring at- 
tempts with two gallant goal line 
stands late in the contest. 

The seemingly unstoppable De- 
mon offense continued to pile 
up yardage as they managed to 
grind out a total of 320 yards. 
Their rushing totaled 242 mark- 
ers, while they gained 78 by 
throwing. 

An equally impressive per- 
formance was turned in by the 
stalwart Demon defensive unit as 
they allowed the Goshawks only 
207 yeards total offense. 

Roger Staubach, former Hies- 
man Trophy Winner with the 
Naval Academy in 1963, who was 
expected to provide the Demon 
defense with an interesting night, 
played only five plays through- 
out the game, and reinsured his 
already weak ankle. 

The Goshawks startled the par- 
tisan crowd in Demon Stadium as 
they took the opening kickoff 
and marched 69 yards in 8 plays 
for their first score. 

Spearheaded by the running of 
former University of California 

Volleyball Tilt 
Set Tomorrow 

The girl's volleyball team will 
compete in a tournament this 
weekend at the Men and Women's 
Gymnasium. The tournament 
will begin Friday night at 6 
o'clock and then continue Sat- 
urday morning. 

Other teams entering the tour- 
nament are LSUA, McNeese, Cen- 
tenary, NLSC, Memphis State 
University and Southwestern. 

Girls on the college team are: 
Judy Bright, Marcia Elkins, Char- 
leen Gallo, Jane Green, Judy Hill, 
Debbie Krane, Mary Louviere, 
Janie Marino, Fern Martin, Laura 
McCain, Naomi Monk, Julia Par- 
ker, Linda Robichaux, Diana 
Thomas, Pat Tauzin, Dottie Lon- 
adieu and Phyllis Love. 

Last weekend the team attend- 
ed a volleyball clinic at Sam 
Houston State College in Hunts- 
ville, Tex. At the clinic, di- 
rected by Mrs. Howard McChes- 
ney, new methods and skills of 
volleyball were taught by ex- 
perienced players such as Smitty 
Duke, former Ail-American volley- 
ball star. 



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halfback Al Nelson and the pass- 
ing of quarterback Jerry Ward, 
the Goshawks moved down to the 
Demon 7. 

After failing in four plays to 
get the six-pointer, Ward stepped 
in and booted a field goal that 
made the score 3-0 with 10:48 
remaining on the clock. 

After failing to mount a drive, 
the Purple and White found day- 
light when a Pensacola receiver 
dropped a Shelly Dickie punt on 
the 48. Linebacker Bill Stevens 
alertly pounced on the ball and 
gave the Demons new life. 

With Don Guidry handling the 
chores, the Demons put six points 
on the scoreboard in just five 
plays hitting Al Phillips with a 
pass in the end zone for the score. 

The Demons set up another 
second period score after John 
Boogaerts returned a punt to the 
Demon 30. Guidry ran and passed 
his way into Goshawk territory 
finally hitting split end Jerry 
Mott with a scoring aerial from 
the five. 

In the second half the Demons 
took up right where they left off. 
With Malcolm Lewis calling the 
plays, the Demons drove deep 
into the Goshawk end of the play- 
ing field in nine plays. On a sec- 
ond and goal situation, Lewis 
rolled around left end and fell 
into the end zone for another 
tally. Phillip Creel booted the 
PAT, and made the score 21-3. 

The final Demon tally of the 
night came early in the fourth 
quarter when the Demons laun- 
ched a drive with Vic Nyvall lead- 
ing the way. Phillips capped the 
drive with a score around left 
end on a eight yard run. 

The next contest on the De- 
mons' schedule will be against 
rival La. Tech in Shreveport on 
Oct. 21. 



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Friday, October 14, 1967 



Page 3 



CSC Becomes Holy Cross Church 
Under Authorization by Bishop 



Father James Fahey, C.S.C., 
of the Congregation of the Holy 
Cross, has been appointed by Bis- 
hop Charles Greco of the Diocese 
of Alexandria to direct the work 
of the Catholic Student Center 
now serving tire needs of Catho- 
lics at the college. Bishop Greco 

Faculty Briefs 

Dr. Marie Dunn, head of the 
Northwestern State College De- 
partment of Home Economics, 
participated in a Workshop on 
Consumer Credit in Family 
Financial Management Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday at the 
University of Wisconsin in Mad- 
ision. 

The Northwestern professor 
was one of five home economists 
from Louisiana selected for the 
workshop by the American Home 
Economics Association. 

More than 200 home econo- 
mists, college faculty members 
and administrators, bankers and 
attorneys took part in the three- 
day sessions. 

The purpose of the workshop 
was to orient home economists 
in the organization and direction 
of workshop in their states to 
upgrade instruction in the area 
of consumer credit in family 
financial management. 



The college sent five members 
of its Special Education Depart- 
ment to the annual meeting of 
the Louisiana Speech and Hear- 
ing Association in Shreveport 
last Saturday and Sunday. 

Edward E. Matis, Sam Mor- 
rison, R. M. Farris, Carol Schmidt 
and Viola Willis represented 
Northwestern at the meeting. 

More than 350 speech and hear- 
ing specialists from throughout 
the state attended the two-day 
meeting at the Quality Courts. 

Northwestern displayed a table- 
top model of the new Vocational 
Rehabilitation Speech and Hear- 
ing Center now under construc- 
tion on the campus. 

The $100,000 center is expect- 
ed to be completed in time for 
the spring semester and will be 
among the best equipped and 
most modern in the state. The 
Northwestern delegation r e - 
vealed plans for the center to 
the convention. 



Dr. Michael J. Cousins, head of 
the Department of Special Edu- 
cation, addressed the staff of 
Central Louisiana State Hospital 
yesterday in Pineville. 

The topic of Cousins' talk was 
"The Role and Function of Loui- 
siana's Special Education Cen- 
ters." 

Cousins, who holds his doctor- 
ate from Florida State University, 
was associated with the Depart- 
of Public Welfare, Veterans Ad- 
ministration and Department of 
Hospitals befoe joining the North- 
staff. 



Dr. Raymond McCoy, head of 
the Educational Psychology and 
Guidances, is attending the south- 
ern regional meeting of the 
Association for Counselor Edu- 
cation this week in Atlanta, Ga. 

Attending the seminar and dis- 
cussion session throughout the 
week will be counselor educa- 
tors and supervisors of guidance 
from 12 southern states. 

The program will feature na- 
tionally-known authorities from 
the United States Office of Edu- 
cation as well as from the staff 
of the American Personnel and 
Guidance Association. 



Dr. Tom H. Wells, Associate 
Professor of History, addressed 
the East Texas Historical Asso- 
ciation at a luncheon meeting 
Stephen F. Austin College in 
Nacogdoches, Tex., last week. 

His subject was the trading 
firm of Murphy, Barr, Davenport 
and Smith which operated in the 
from 1798 until 1808. 



has also authorized a change of 
name from Catholic Student Cen- 
ter to Holy Cross Church. 

According to Father Fahey, 
this follows a national policy 
now being established in the 
church to change student centers 
and Newman Clubs to full par- 
ishes. This change enables the 
church to better serve Catholics 
on campus and helps establish 
the idea of a Christian commun- 
ity at school. 

Renovation of the interior of 
the old student center has pro- 
vided living quarters for two 
priests and additional office 
space. Construction should be 
completed by this Sunday. 

Among the activities scheduled 
this fall at Holy Cross Church are 
weekly and bi-weekly discussion 
groups. These groups will meet 
to talk over the recent changes 
in the mass as well as many con- 
troversial issues that face all 
Christians, both Catholic; and 
Protestant in their every day 
life. 

"My main interest for a long 
time," said Father Fahey, "has 
been the changes in the church 
on the local level. Here is where 
the renovation of the church, 
developed theoretically by the 
Vatican Council, must be imple- 
mented and lived. Here is where 
the revitalization of the life of 
Catholics must come, within the 
circle of friends and neighbors 
that makes up a parish." 

"It's my hope that we can build 
such a living community follow- 
ing the lines laid down by the 
council." 

Masses at Holy Cross church 
are now at 9 and 10:30 Sunday 




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mornings and at 5 p.m. on week 
days. Those students who have 
not already done so are invited 
to join the new parish and pick 
up a booklet that explains the 
new function of the student cen- 
ter as a parish. 



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MARK Of LXCElUNCE 



Page 4 



iHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 14, 1967 



Pledge Classes 
Grow,Organize 



PI KAPPA PHI 

Four men have been initiated 
into the active chapter of Pi 
Kappa Phi. They are Leon Briggs, 
Doug Barnett, Wayne Sandefur 
and Tommy Verhalen. 

In addition to the increase in 
active membership, seven pledges 
have been added to the rolls, 
bringing the fall pledge class to 
a total of 28. They are Harold 
Brumley, Allen Botts, Sid Farm- 
er, Macon Gean, Bill Hatcher, 
Steve Keith and Sam Perry. 

Heading the class as pledge 
president is Reggie Harvey. Serv- 
ing with him is Gordon Burton, 
secretary; James Hooter, treas- 
urer; Steve Span, warden and 
Owen Gibbs, chaplain. 



party with the KA chapter from 
Tech on Friday, Oct 20, and a 
closed party for the NSC chapter 
after the big game Saturday. 



SIGMA KAPPA 

Three new pledges, Sam Spi- 
vey, Richard Ware and Dave 
Durham, have joined the ranks 
of Kappa Sigma fraternity. 

Besides increasing the size of 
its pledge class, Kappa Sigma has 
been formulating plans for Tech 
weekend. Scheduled for Friday 
night is a dance featuring the 
"Entertainers" and another dance 
Saturday night with the "Magni- 
ficent Seven" providing the 
music. 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Kappa Alpha continues to in- 
crease its membership with the 
addition of three new pledges. 
They are Wayne Cooley, David 
Smelley and Matt West. 

These new pledges will join 
their brothers in planning for 
Tech Weekend. Plans include a 

Demons No. 4 



(A.P.) 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Those four cute 'girls' at the 
football game Saturday night 
were four Tau pledges. These 
spirit-conscious 'ladies' were 
George Gray, Bob Murphy, Jack 
Bennett and Bob Sheldon. Do you 
suppose they will reappear for 
the State Fair game? 

Sigma Tau will sponsor a dance 
after the Tech game at the Pro- 
gressive Men's Club from 10 p.m. 
until 2 a.m. Music will be pro- 
vided by Jimmy Hughes and his 
band. Tickets are $5 per couple 
and may be purchased from any 
fraternity member. 



Local BSU Members 
Attend State Meet 



A record number of over 100 
Baptist students will represent 
NSC at the State Baptist Sudent 
Union convenion at the First Bap- 
tist Church in Lake Charles, to- 
day through Sunday. 

Mike Miller, microbiology major 
from Winnfield, is presently ser- 
ving as State BSU President and 




Mike Miller 



is scheduled to bring the presi- 
dent's address tonight in con- 
junction with the theme of the 
convention which is, "Unto the 
Least of These." 

Dr. Donald Rawson of the his- 
tory department is this year's 
local BSU faculty adviser and will 
teach the Sunday School lesson 
at the Convention. The Northwest- 
ern BSU choir will also take part 
in the program leading the state 
representatives at tonight's ser- 
vice and presenting special mu- 
sic. 

Walley Hebert, president of the 
BSU, stated that with increased 
numbers as well as increased en- 
thusiasm, this convention could 
well be the experience of a life- 
time for many people. 

The entire convention will be 
centered around the college stu- 
dent with his special needs and 
problems, according to State Presi- 
dent Miller, featuring seminars 
on "The New Morality" and other 
pertinent topics. 

The delegation will leave from 
Louisiana Hall, Iberville, and St. 
Denis in three buses this after- 
noon. All classes will be excused 
for those who registered in ad- 
vance at the Baptist Student 
Union. 



School's Centrax System Offers Great 
Vistas In Campus-Wide Communication 



The new long-awaited, campus- 
wide Centrax Telephone System 
has been installed this semester. 
One of the unique advantages of 
the new system is that it has 
made private telephones avail- 
able to those students living in 
Sabine and Rapides dormitories. 
Each room has a phone in it. How- 
ever, an additional charge has 
been added for the use of the 
personal phones. The cost is $10 
for each student using a private 
line. 

This telephone system is on an 
experimental basis at this time, 
according to Dean of Students, 
Dudley Fulton. Plans are being 
considered to expand individual 
telephones to as many dorms as 
possible. Dean Fulton pointed- 
out that there may be students 



who would not desire a personal 
phone, for one reason or another. 
He emphasized that the student's 
rights would be honored at all 
times. Dean Fulton advised that 
the administration will consider 
the feasibility of placing private 
telephones in certain dormitories 
so that the student could have a 
choice in selecting a room with 
private service. 

The school rents the telephones 
for 12 months a year, but the stu- 
dent rate of $10 is based on ap- 
proximately nine months of dor- 
mitory living a year. 

Dean Fulton further explained 
that Southern Bell telephone 
corporation had paid for the 
equipment, but the college had 
to provide a building in which 
Centrax is housed. 




Teaching Center To Emphasize 
Perfect Learning Environment 



The proposed Northwestern 
Teacher Education Center repre- 
sents a totally new concept in 
education. 

"Closed circuit television, car- 
peting, acoustical ceilings, cli- 
mate control will all combine to 
form the most desirable learning 
environment in the South and 
possibly in the nation," says Dean 
T. P. Southerland of the School 
of Education. 

Experts from all over the na- 
tion, particularly consultants 
from the University of Tennes- 
see, have aided in the designing 
and planning of the structure. 
Dr. Barney L. Kyzar, head of the 
College School Planning Labora- 
tory, has been instrumental in 
guiding each step of the planning 



for the center. 

A steering committee composed 
of top administrative officials 
have worked for almost two years 
with departmental sub-commit- 
tees to make their dream of a 
NSC Teacher Education Center a 
reality. 

The 70,000 square foot struc- 
ture, composed of four "pod like" 
wings will be located on the 
ridge behind the new dining and 
housing complex. Administrative 
offices; a guidance and council- 
ing center; facilities for educat- 
ing the retarded; experimental 
classes for grades one through 
eight; a kindergarten; classes for 
secondary education in social 
sciences, language arts, and math 
and science; all of these will be 



provided. 

There will also be what may 
prove to be the most functional 
unit of all — a 250-capacity audi- 
torium with every modern audio- 
visual device. 




College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 




Radio Sale 

7- Transistor, Model No. 7747 

only $4.25 

8- Transistor, Model No. 876 

only $4.95 

12-Transistor, Model No. 1047 

only $6.95 

All Radios have Battery Earphone 
and One Year Guarantee 

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Friday, October 14, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



Meet Maude The Maid 



Cast Carries The Comedy In First 
Show Of College Theatre Season 



By Jim O'Quinn 

Take a gang of well-seasoned 
stage veterans, add a smatering 
of promising new faces, mix it 
all up in a tried-and-true comic 
situation, and what do you have? 

Somewhat less, unfortunately, 
than it takes to make the latest 
College Theatre presentation, 
"More Than Meets the Eye," a 
really satisfying evening of 
theatre. 

"More Than Meets the Eye," as 
performed by Dr. Edna West's 11- 
member troupe of students, is a 
very funny show. The cast is 
blessed with enough Speech De- 
partment stand-bys to carry an 
elephant over the Alps — but the 
weight of Fred Carmichael's la- 
borious, cliche-ridden script some- 
times just proves too much for 
them. (Mr. Carmichael's worst 
problems come in the third act, 
when he abandons his "situation" 
for pages and pages of unsubtle 
third-grade philosophizing — and 
what actor can entertain while 
trying to push hackneyed moral 
platitudes down an audience's 
throat?) 

The cast does itself proud with 
the material available, and the 
opening audience responded with 
enough laughter to last three 



performances through. 

Chief among the show's assets 
is Alice Anne Conner, an actress 
adept at scene-stealing (she won 
last year's Best Supporting Act- 
ress Edna for a 10-line walk-on 
performance in "You Can't Take 
It With You") who grunts and 
blusters around the stage as 
Maude The Maid. 

Lynn Hellinghausen and Susan 
Ehlers are interesting and be- 
lievable as the show's female 
leads. Only Miss Hellinghausen 
could deliver lines like, "She 
lives in the hearts of thousands 
of little children! She lives for 
me!" and make us almost believe 
it. 

Miss Ehlers, a freshman speech 
major from Lake Charles, is one 
of those promising new faces. 
She was an award-winning actress 
in high school, and has already 
exhibited, in this first appearance 
on the College Theatre stage, the 
poise and ability that made her 
so. Audiences can look forward 
to seeing her often in future pro- 
ductions. 

Byron Nail plays the pivot of 
young writer Stanley Nichols, 
who elects to be Grandmother of 
the Year in drag rather than re- 
veal his secret literary identity 
as an old-lady authoress. Nail 



shows a developing flair for 
comedy, and his scenes with an 
elderly admirer are delightful. 

Freshman James Schwartz has 
an unfortunate encounter with 
what should have been the juc- 
iest role in the show, and strains 
our credibility past the believing- 
point with his 1930-ish mugging 
and self-conscious histronics. But 
expert support from veterans 
Barbara Gresham, Marcella Mc- 
Glothen, Bruce Kalman and Suzy 
Hames holds the show tightly to- 
gether to create a field of comic 
tension on which the central 
characters' situations are re- 
solved. 

Fred Magee, adequate in the 
part of a teen-age intellectual, 
and Charles Machen, in a last- 
second run-on role, complete the 
cast. 

The production is pleasantly 
staged and executed (though a 
frayed tree profile visible 
through the set's French doors 
may prove irritating to the house 
right audience). 

Credits also go to Stage Man- 
ager Susie Chancey, Assistant to 
the Director Peggy Beasley, and 
a large production staff under 
the supervision of Technical Di- 
rector Frank Magers. 




I This is Louise Gary... 




THE COLLEGE ROTC rifle team, commanded by Lt. Jerry Ryland of Shreveport, recently won its first 
match by defeating Northeastern by a score of 116 to 96. Members of the team include (kneeling, left 
to right) Cadets Kern, Sharp, Cooley, Creed, Team Commander Ryland, (standing, left to right) Davis, 
Boyd, Albritten, Henderson, Opio, and Farmer. 

Cadets Receive 
ROTC Insignias 

The ROTC advanced corps ca- 
dets recently received their 
branch insignias from Captain 
Richard E. Rahm of the ROTC 
cadre staff. 

The cadets who received their 
insignias are: Henry L. Burns, 
William Cavanaugh, Robert L. 
Davis, Don G. Dean, John C. 
Deblieu, Everett Doubleday, John 
F. Dunn, Don S. Durlon, James 
H. Fair, Jr., John W. Hall, David 
A. Hippler, Lee Arnold Hollo- 
well, Randall Jackson, Malcomb 
Kirsop, William A. Lalond, To- 
man McCullough, Richard G. 
Oedor, Robin Sills, Robert Smith, 
Ralph E. Stapleton, Michael Ste- 
phenson, James R. Tate, Stuart 
Williams, Augustus T. Bajin, 
Jerry G. Bounds, Ronald P. 
Brown, John Bumgardner, James 
Churchman, Wayne L. Cooley, 
Louis J. Duet, Michael R. Fonger, 
Don M. Gaddis, Louis T. Holmes, 
PI, Robert L. Mooring, Anton A. 
Rispoli, Paul L. Rivet, John San- 
dell, Ronnie D. Schilling, Wil- 
liam Simpson, Fred Throgmorton, 
William S. West, and Cecil G. 
Today, Jr. 



i 



She is a senior Chemistry major from Midland, La. down in 
the rice country. She plans to marry Michael next June after 
her graduation from NSC. Graduate work in Chemistry is on 
her list of things to do next fall. In the meantime she enjoys 
sewing and cooking (her favorite dish is cheeseburger pie) 
usually accompanied by some kind of pop rock. Louise is a 
member of Alpha Lamda Delta fraternity and is a member 
of the American Chemical Society. For her, words to relax 
by are found in Science Fiction novels. 

John C. Guillet PHOTOGRAPHY is sponsor of this space 
and will feature interesting characters throughout the year. 

By the way, we're on Second Street at Amulet 



Westminster Selects New Officers; 
Barr, Hawkes To Head Organization 

lln TVS l"\ ft >* r» n.C 4-1a.« — "1 1 _ _ _ T»T ± n mm 



Members of the college West- 
minister organization for Pres- 
byterians selected their officers 
for the school year last Wednes- 
day night during the group's reg- 
ular weekly meeting. 

John Barr was elected to head 
the group as moderator and Dore- 
en Hawkes, vice-moderator. Miss 
Hawkes will also be responsible 



for the organization's weekly pro- 
gram. 

Marcia Buss was selected sec- 
retary-treasurer and Bruce Yeat- 
man, junior represenalve. 

Yeatmen and Barr will repre- 
sent the college's Westminister 
club Saturday at a Synod-wide 
council meeting in Baton Rouge. 




On Campus 

{By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!", 
"Dobie Gillis," etc.) 



with 




(Incidentally, you may never know the complete an- 
swer to Pitt the Elder's shaving habits, but of one thing 
you can be positive : no matter how often he shaved and 
no matter what blades he used, he never enjoyed the 
shaving comfort that you do. I am assuming, of course, 
that you use Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades, a 
logical assumption to make when one is addressing col- 
lege men— which is to say men of perspicacity, discrimi- 
nation, wit, taste, cognizance, and shrewdness— for 
Personna is a blade to please the perspicacious, delight 
the discriminating, win the witty, tickle the tasteful, 
coddle the cognizer, and shave the shrewd. 

(I bring up Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades be- 
cause the makers of Personna Super Stainless Steel 
Blades pay me to write this column, and they are in- 
clined to sulk if I omit to mention their product. I would 
not like to see them unhappy, the makers of Personna, 
for they are fine ruddy men, fond of morris dancing and 
home brewed root beer, and they make a blade that 
shaves closely and cleanly, nicklessly and hacklessly, and 
is sharp and gleaming and durable and available both in 
double-edge style and Injector style. 

(And from these same bounteous blademakers comes 
Burma-Shave, regular or menthol, a lather that out- 
lathers other lathers, brother. So if you'd rather lather 
better, and soak your whiskers wetter, Burma-Shave's 
your answer.) 

But I digress. We have now solved the problem of 
maturity. In subsequent columns we'll take up other is- 
sues, equally burning. Since 1953 when this column first 
started running in your campus paper, we've tackled 
such thorny questions as "Can a student of 19 find hap- 
piness with an economics professor of 90 ?" and "Should 
capital punishment for pledges be abolished?" and "Are 
room-mates sanitary?" Be assured that in this, our 14th 
year, we will not be less bold. 

* * * © 1967. Max Shulmao 

The maker* of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades 
(double-edge or Injector) and Burma-Shave (regular 
or menthol) are pleas id (or apprehensive) to bring you 
another year of Max Shulman't uninhibited, uncen- 
sored column. 



THERE ARE NO BAD TEACHERS; 
THERE ARE ONLY BAD STUDENTS 

The academic year has only just begun and already 
one thing is clear : you're not ready for college. 

What, then, should you do? Should you throw up your 
hands and quit? I say no ! I say you must attack, grapple, 
cope ! I say America did not become the world's leader in 
motel construction and kidney transplants by running 
away from a fight ! 

To the question then : You say you're not ready for col- 
lege. You're too green, too naive. You lack maturity. 

Okay, the answer is simple: get mature. How? Well 
sir, to achieve maturity you need two things : 

a) a probing mind ; 

b) a vest. 

A probing mind will be quickly yours if you'll remem- 
ber that education consists not of answers but of ques- 
tions. Blindly accepting information and dumbly 
memorizing data is high school stuff. In college you don't 
just accept. You dispute, you push, you pry, you chal- 
lenge. If, for instance, your physics prof says, "E equals 
mc squared," don't just write it down. Say to the prof, 
"Why?" 

This will show him two things : 

a) Your mind is a keen, thrusting instrument. 

b) You are in the wrong major. 

Ask questions, questions, and more questions. That is 
the essence of maturity, the heart and liver of education. 
Nothing will more quickly convince the teachers that you 
are of college calibre. And the tougher your questions, 
the better. Come to class with queries that dart and flash, 
that make unexpected sallies into uncharted territory. 
Ask things which have never been asked before, like 
"How tall was Nietzsche?" and "Did the Minotaur have 
ticks? If so, were they immortal?" and "How often did 
Pitt the Elder shave?" 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 14, 1967 



J 



From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 



Demons Down The Goshawks 
For 14th Straight Victory 



No. 14 



An All-time Record 



Last week's 28-16 victory over the unexpectedly tough 
Pensacola Navy Goshawks was the 14th consecutive victory 
stretching back to the final game of the 1965 season. The 
conquest established an all-time record for a Demon football 
squad. The win was yet another milestone in the glittering 
success story of our great gridiron crews during the last 
year and a half. What more they can accomplish in their 
football endeavors is anyone's guess. We think quite a lot 
more . . . "if." 

The "if" in question is whether or not the Demons will 
fall prey to the inherent danger that all winning teams in- 
variably must face, and that is an invincibility complex. In 
simpler words, subconscious belief in the players' minds 
that they cannot lose no matter how badly they play. This 
factor will definitely come into the spotlight in our next 
five games. 



Pensacola 



A Shallow Victory? 



Although its true we did win, from our vantage point 
it appeared as if the Demons just weren't ready to play their 
best brand of football. This could be the result of many 
opposing factors. To be specific, the Demons had to have 
their physical machine sharply honed, and their mental 
frames of mind at an emotional peak for the top effort 
which they turned in against Northeast. This proved what 
everybody had more or less conceded, that the Demons could 
handle anyone if they wanted to. The second and third con- 
tributing elements were the fact that they were going to 
play Pensacola in their next game, a team which they had 
thrashed the year before, and could only boast of one asset, 
Roger Staubach, and it was not certain that he could play, 
which eventually he didn't. Of course the last factor was over- 
looking the Goshawks for our arch-rivals, La. Tech. Indeed, at 
the Pensacola pep rally, the cheerleaders struck-up the "Let's 
Wreck Tech" chant as the bonfire embers flickered out. There 
it was Thursday, more than two weeks from State Fair, and no 
one seemed to care that we had a game in between. 

Spirit Sags Significantly 

And then it was Saturday night in Demon Stadium. The 
squad came out before a three-fourths filled stadium, and 
only a token round of applause and cheers trickled forth 
from the "fans." That's a rather strange attitude, unless per- 
haps the invincibility complex has carried over to the spec- 
tators too, which would make things worse. Nevertheless, it 
would be hard to distinguish the pressbox side of the stadium 
and the crowds it contained, from the reserved tennis galler- Sq\ Tomorrow 
ies that traditionally make no sound until the affair is over. 
As a matter of fact, we believe that tennis fans probably cheer 
more. Again though, the fraternity and band sections led the 
rabble-rousing corps in support of our cheerleaders, who have 
thoroughly mastered the art of throwing the female members 
of the group all around the track, although their vociferous 
activities seem to be limited in a sense. Perhaps they should 
put their fine gymnastics abilities to better use, surely Coach 
Vega of the gymnastics team would welcome them. 

State Fair and Tech . 



Led by the elusive running of 
halfback Alywn Phillips, the 
sixth-ranked Demons became 
owners of the longest winning 
streak in school history Saturday 
night as they slipped past the 
surprisingly stubborn Pensacola 
Navy Goshawks 28-16. 

This win marked the 14th 
straight victory for the Demons 
over a three year span, and also 
erased a 27 year-old mark set by 
the 1940 Demon eleven. 

Phillips, a product of Lee High 
of Baton Rouge, scored twice dur- 
ing the night's gridiron battle 
reaching paydirt on a 13-yard 
pass reception in the second quar- 
ter, and on an 8-yard scoring 
jaunt in the final period. 

A strong defensive effort was 
required by the Demons to se- 
cure the victory, as they had to 
fight off constant enemy pene- 
trations, and halt scoring at- 
tempts with two gallant goal line 
stands late in the contest. 

The seemingly unstoppable De- 
mon offense continued to pile 
up yardage as they managed to 
grind out a total of 320 yards. 
Their rushing totaled 242 mark- 
ers, while they gained 78 by 
throwing. 

An equally impressive per- 
formance was turned in by the 
stalwart Demon defensive unit as 
they allowed the Goshawks only 
207 yeards total offense. 

Roger Staubach, former Hies- 
man Trophy Winner with the 
Naval Academy in 1963, who was 
expected to provide the Demon 
defense with an interesting night, 
played only five plays through- 
out the game, and reinjured his 
already weak ankle. 

The Goshawks startled the par- 
tisan crowd in Demon Stadium as 
they took the opening kickoff 
and marched 69 yards in 8 plays 
for their first score. 

Spearheaded by the running of 
former University of California 



Volleyball. Tilt 



. . A Demon Waterloo? 

At first glance, the above subhead may seem ridiculous 
and unfounded. But a closer scrutiny of the situation reveals 
some intriguing yet truthful (however painful) aspects of the 
annual grudge game. Perhaps the most outstanding of them is 
the all-time series record between the arch enemies. Unfor- 
tunately, Tech holds a commanding lead of 33 wins and 14 
losses since the ancient affair began in 1909. There have been 
only four ties. In the past 37 years, the Demons have only 
managed to put back to back victories together against the 
Bulldogs twice, the last time coming in 1961 and'62. 

For further evidence that the old adage that goes "You 
can throw out the record books for this one" can certainly be 
applied here, one needs only to reflect back on the ill-fated 
1965 season. The Demons had roared-off to a 4-0 slate, while 
the Bulldogs were in the throes of a 0-4 worksheet. However, 
when the scoreboard at State Fair Stadium had stopped blink- 
(See From Down Under, Page 7) 



The girl's volleyball team will 
compete in a tournament this 
weekend at the Men and Women's 
Gymnasium. The tournament 
will begin Friday night at 6 
o'clock and then continue Sat- 
urday morning. 

Other teams entering the tour- 
nament are LSUA, McNeese. Cen- 
tenary, NLSC, Memphis State 
University and Southwestern. 

Girls on the college team are: 
Judy Bright, Marcia Elkins, Char- 
leen Gallo, Jane Green, Judy Hill, 
Debbie Krane, Mary Louviere, 
Janie Marino, Fern Martin, Laura 
McCain, Naomi Monk, Julia Par- 
ker, Linda Robichaux, Diana 
Thomas, Pat Tauzin, Dottie Lon- 
adieu and Phyllis Love. 

Last weekend the team attend- 
ed a volleyball clinic at Sam 
Houston State College in Hunts- 
ville, Tex. At the clinic, di- 
rected by Mrs. Howard McChes- 
ney, new methods and skills of 
volleyball were taught by ex- 
perienced players such as Smitty 
Duke, former All-American volley- 
ball star. 



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halfback Al Nelson and the pass- 
ing of quarterback Jerry Ward, 
the Goshawks moved down to the 
Demon 7. 

After failing in four plays to 
get the six-pointer, Ward stepped 
in and booted a field goal that 
made the score 3-0 with 10:48 
remaining on the clock. 

After failing to mount a drive, 
the Purple and White found day- 
light when a Pensacola receiver 
dropped a Shelly Dickie punt on 
the 48. Linebacker Bill Stevens 
alertly pounced on the ball and 
gave the Demons new life. 

With Don Guidry handling the 
chores, the Demons put six points 
on the scoreboard in just five 
plays hitting Al Phillips with a 
pass in the end zone for the score. 

The Demons set up another 
second period score after John 
Boogaerts returned a punt to the 
Demon 30. Guidry ran and passed 
his way into Goshawk territory 
finally hitting split end Jerry 
Mott with a scoring aerial from 
the five. 

In the second half the Demons 
took up right where they left off. 
With Malcolm Lewis calling the 
plays, the Demons drove deep 
into the Goshawk end of the play- 
ing field in nine plays. On a sec- 
ond and goal situation, Lewis 
rolled around left end and fell 
into the end zone for another 
tally. Phillip Creel booted the 
PAT, and made the score 21-3. 

The final Demon tally of the 
night came early in the fourth 
quarter when the Demons laun- 
ched a drive with Vic Nyvall lead- 
ing the way. Phillips capped the 
drive with a score around left 
end on a eight yard run. 

The next contest on the De- 
mons' schedule will be against 
rival La. Tech in Shreveport on 
Oct. 21. 



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Gibsons Discount Store 



.Friday, October 14, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



CSC Becomes Holy Cross Church 
Under Authorization by Bishop 



Father James Fahey, C.S.C., 
of the Congregation of the Holy 
Cross, has been appointed by Bis- 
hop Charles Greco of the Diocese 
of Alexandria to direct the work 
of the Catholic Student Center 
now serving the needs of Catho- 
lics at the college. Bishop Greco 

Faculty Briefs 

Dr. Marie Dunn, head of the 
Northwestern State College De- 
partment of Home Economics, 
participated in a Workshop on 
Consumer Credit in Family 
Financial Management Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday at the 
University of Wisconsin in Mad- 
ision. 

The Northwestern professor 
was one of five home economists 
from Louisiana selected for the 
workshop by the American Home 
Economics Association. 

More than 200 home econo- 
mists, college faculty members 
and administrators, bankers and 
attorneys took part in the three- 
day sessions. 

The purpose of the workshop 
was to orient home economists 
in the organization and direction 
of workshop in their states to 
upgrade instruction in the area 
of consumer credit in family 
financial management. 



The college sent five members 
of its Special Education Depart- 
ment to the annual meeting of 
the Louisiana Speech and Hear- 
ing Association in Shreveport 
last Saturday and Sunday. 

Edward E. Matis, Sam Mor- 
rison, R. M. Farris, Carol Schmidt 
and Viola Willis represented 
Northwestern at the meeting. 

More than 350 speech and hear- 
ing specialists from throughout 
the state attended the two-day 
meeting at the Quality Courts. 

Northwestern displayed a table- 
top model of the new Vocational 
Rehabilitation Speech and Hear- 
ing Center now under construc- 
tion on the campus. 

The $100,000 center is expect- 
ed to be completed in time for 
the spring semester and will be 
among the best equipped and 
most modern in the state. The 
Northwestern delegation r e - 
vealed plans for the center to 
the convention. 



Dr. Michael J. Cousins, head of 
the Department of Special Edu- 
cation, addressed the staff of 
Central Louisiana State Hospital 
yesterday in Pineville. 

The topic of Cousins' talk was 
"The Role and Function of Loui- 
siana's Special Education Cen- 
ters." 

Cousins, who holds his doctor- 
ate from Florida State University, 
was associated with the Depart- 
of Public Welfare, Veterans Ad- 
ministration and Department of 
Hospitals befoe joining the North- 
staff. 



Dr. Raymond McCoy, head of 
the Educational Psychology and 
Guidances, is attending the south- 
ern regional meeting of the 
Association for Counselor Edu- 
cation this week in Atlanta, Ga. 

Attending the seminar and dis- 
cussion session throughout the 
week will be counselor educa- 
tors and supervisors of guidance 
from 12 southern states. 

The program will feature na- 
tionally-known authorities from 
the United States Office of Edu- 
cation as well as from the staff 
°f the American Personnel and 
Guidance Association. 



Dr. Tom H. Wells, Associate 
Professor of History, addressed 
the East Texas Historical Asso- 
ciation at a luncheon meeting 
a t Stephen F. Austin College in 
Nacogdoches, Tex., last week. 

His subject was the trading 
firm of Murphy, Barr, Davenport 
and Smith which operated in the 
from 1798 until 1808. 



has also authorized a change of 
name from Catholic Student Cen- 
ter to Holy Cross Church. 

According to Father Fahey, 
this follows a national policy 
now being established in the 
church to change student centers 
and Newman Clubs to full par- 
ishes. This change enables the 
church to better serve Catholics 
on campus and helps establish 
the idea of a Christian commun- 
ity at school. 

Renovation of the interior of 
the old student center has pro- 
vided living quarters for two 
priests and additional office 
space. Construction should be 
completed by this Sunday. 

Among the activities scheduled 
this fall at Holy Cross Church are 
weekly and bi-weekly discussion 
groups. These groups will meet 
to talk over the recent changes 
in the mass as well as many con- 
troversial issues that face all 
Christians, both Catholic; and 
Protestant in their every day 
life. 

"My main interest for a long, 
time," said Father Fahey, "has 
been the changes in the church 
on the local level. Here is where 
the renovation of the church, 
developed theoretically by the 
Vatican Council, must be imple- 
mented and lived. Here is where 
the revitalization of the life of 
Catholics must come, within the 
circle of friends and neighbors 
that makes up a parish." 

"It's my hope that we can build 
such a living community follow- 
ing the lines laid down by the 
council." 

Masses at Holy Cross church 
are now at 9 and 10:30 Sunday 




Holiday Cleaners 

One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 
Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

One-Hour Mart inizing Cleaners 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



Father James Fahey 

mornings and at 5 p.m. on week 
days. Those students who have 
not already done so are invited 
to join the new parish and pick 
up a booklet that explains the 
new function of the student cen- 
ter as a parish. 



WRECK 
TECH! 



Max Factor Presents 

The First Soft Color For Hair 
New TRIED & TRUE Shampoo 
In Permanent Hair Color 

— 14 Shades — 
Complete Kit -$2.00 

By MAX FACTOR 
McClung Drug Company 

600 Front Street Phone 352-2461 

We Deliver To All Dorms 



Daringly new! 
Chevrolet's new line of 
Super Sports for '68. 



Computer-tuned suspension systems. Improved 
shock absorbers. New double-cushioned rubber 
body mounts. They all team up to bring you the 
smoothest, most silent Chevrolet ride ever. A tress 
new idea in ventilation comes standard on every 
1968 Camaro and Corvette. It's Astro Ventilation, 
a system that lets air in, but keep? noise and wind 



out. You'll appreciate all the proved safety 
features on the '68 Chevrolets, including the 
GM-developed energy-absorbing steering 
column and many new ones. More style. 
More performance.- More all-around value. One 
look tells you these are for the man who loves 
driving. One demonstration drive shows why ! 




Chevelle SS 396 Sport Coupe 



Be smart ! 
Be sure ! 

Buy now at your 

Chevrolet 

dealer's. 




Of £X££U£NCE 



"1 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 14, 1967 




Workshop Planned For Circle K 



BREAKTHROUGH! This was the beginning of the latest Demon football victory — and the excitement on 
the field brings anticipations of Tech, the biggest contest of them all. Shreveport will be the scene (the 
city is already preparing) of Louisiana's oldest classic of small college competition next week-end. 

'Guaranteed Income' Is Prime 
Topic For College Debate Team 



Guaranteed minimum cash in- 
come is the question of the mo- 
ment for over 30 students here 
in preparation for the first de- 
bate bout of the year at San Ja- 
cinto College, Pasadena, Tex. 

With six returning debaters 
and a host of new faces, the sea- 
son which includes meets at 
TCU, La. Tech, Millsaps College, 



and the University of Oklahoma 
should prove a winner for for- 
ensic leader, Ray Schexneider, 
assistant professor of speech. 

From the opener at San Ja- 
cinto of Oct. 27 and 28 to season's 
end in Oklahoma on Feb. 2, the 
ins and outs of guaranteed cash 
incomes will be the subject of 
all subjects. According to Schex- 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




f RATeKHlTY UAUPBcOK". A PRIMARY CMCZZH OFTWS 

FRATERNITY l& TO 0RIN& OUT THE INPlVltTLlAUlTY OPTYPiCAU 
AMEE'ICAN POY^ fizcfA EVERY WAUK OF LIFE," 



neider, "This year's topic will 
prove difficult and exciting in 
the same breath. The team should 
be one of the best yet." 

One of the new events this 
year is the sales talk, listed under 
individual events, in the tourna- 
ment programs. Students will add 
this category to other individual 
events such as radio, TV, ora- 
tory, duet acting, debate, extem- 
poraneous speaking, and inter- 
pretive speaking. 

The Lincoln-Douglas debate 
will be revived at East Central 
State College, Ada, Okla., on Nov. 
30, by Raymond Rodgers. 

Interviews Set 
For Next Week 

Three major companies will be 
in the Placement Office next 
week to conduct employment in- 
terviews. 

H. G. Gober of the R. J. Rey- 
nolds Tobacco Co. will interview 
seniors in all areas of interest 
Tuesday. 

On Wednesday, a representative 
of the Tennessee Gas Pipe Line 
Co. will conduct interviews with 
senior accounting majors. 

Friday, an Aetna Insurance Co. 
representative will see male sen- 
iors for possible appointments in 
the company's executive develop- 
ment programs. 

Appointments for these inter- 
views may be made by calling the 
college placement office in the 
Student Union, phone 357-5621 
or 357-5622. 



Four Sauce Editors 
To Attend Meet 

When the National Associated 
Collegiate Press Association's an- 
nual convention convenes in Chi- 
cago Wednesday, four Current 
Sauce editors will be among hun- 
dreds of collegiate newspaper 
staff members in attendance. 

Leaving Shreveport early Wed- 
nesday by plane for Chicago will 
be Diane Nickerson, editor; Jim 
O'Quinn, assistant editor; Wayne 
Branton, business manager; Jay 
Keppel, co-sports editor, and 
Marc Pettaway, faculty advisor. 

Included in the featured acti- 
vities of the convention are ad- 
dresses by major columnists and 
news personnel as well as work- 
shops on aspects of newspaper 
production. 



Pecan Lanes Bowling Center 

New Opening Time 
Starts Oct. 1st., 11A.M. 

THIS COUPON WORTH 
I 1 FREE GAME 

f IN A 3 GAME SERIES 

Ask About Our 

Bowler Discount Card 

(30% Discount) 



Members of the Circle K ser- 
vice organization will be attend- 
ing a divisional workshop this 
Sunday at the Fine Arts Building 
of Louisiana College in Pineville. 

Representatives from Louisi- 
ana Tech, Northeast, Louisiana 
College, LSUA, McNeese, and 
Southwestern will also be present 
as well as Kiwanians and Key 

LOST AND FOUND 

LOST: One 1967 Senior Class 
Bolton High School Ring bearing 
the initials DST. A $5 reward is 
being offered by the owner, 
Danny Townley, Ph. 6650, West 
Rapides, 422. 



CANE THEATRE 

710 Second St. 
Natchitoches, La. 
Phone 352-2922 



Friday - Saturday 





OUNFIGHT 
'"ABILENE 

TECHNICOLOR 

STARRING 

BOBBY EMILY 

DARIN -BANKS 



ALL NEW FACES -10 NEW SONGS 
THE BIG NEW SOUND 

JAMES A. PIKE 



Presents 




WIDE-SCREEN COLOR 



Sunday - Wednesday 




Meet 
Mordecai Jones- 
Master of 
Bach-Stabbing, 
Cork-Screwing, 
and 

Double-Dealingl 

20th CENTURY FOX 

MAM 

AUIIWIMPWCIIOli 




Starts Thursday 



There exists now a place 
that is illegal in most of the 
World— 

Where you will see The 
Kick Set — Wild Set — 
Wierd Set! 



"SPREE 



Clubbers, who will be special 
guests. 

The purpose of the workshop, 
according to Wayne Branton, 
Circle K President, is to develop 
new ideas and programs of ser- 
vice which Circle K can render 
to the student body and the Nat- 
chitoches community. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
I Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

— Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Last Two Days 
I James Bond 007 
HI 'CASINO ROYAL E' 

is Laughs All 
The Way- 
Peter Sellers 
Ursula Andres 
David Niven 
Woody Allen 
Joanna Pettet 
Orson Wells 
Daliah Lavi 
in color 

Starts Sunday 

— An innocent 
Girl becomes First 
Prize in the Dirtiest 
Game ever played! 

"BORN LOSERS" 

Tom Laughlin 
Elizabeth James 
Jeremy Slate 
Wm. Wellman, Jr. 
in color 



CHIEF, 

D R I V E-I N a , 



Last Times Tonight 

Michael Caine 
is 

"ALFIE" 

Color 

Saturday 

Tony Russell 

"WILD WILD 
PLANET" 

— PLUS— 
Elke Sommer 

"THE 
CORRUPT ONES" 

Both in color 
Sun - Mon - Tues 

Frank Sinatra 

"THE NAKED 
RUNNER" 

Color 

Wednesday 
"Buck Night" 

Natalie Wood 
"PENELOPE" 
— PLUS— 
Rod Taylor 
Jill St. John 

"THE 
LIQUIDATOR" 

Both in Color 



Rivalry To Explode At State Fair 




urrent 




auce 



Vol. LVI— No. 9 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 




Friday, October 20, 1967 

Traditional Splendor 
Brightens Fair Scene 

Traditional rivalry coupled with pomp and ceremony 
comparable to a European coronation will be featured at the 
Louisiana State Fair Saturday. 

Simultaneous to sweat-stained football preparations of 
the rival teams has been the long-range planning of both 
schools for other events of the day. 



WITH THESE HANDS the Demons will try to overc ome the stingy Tech defense in State Fair Stadium 
Saturday night. Pictured from left to right are: end Benny Richard, quarterbacks Malcolm Lewis and 
Don Guidry, and end Steve Gaspard. (See pre-game story on page 6.) 



Gean Defeats Riddle 
In Frosh Election 



WRECK 
TECH!! 



Student leaders and school of- 
ficials from both colleges will 
participate in the day-long pro- 
gram which will be highlighted 
by the Northwestern-Tech Game 
beginning at State Fair Stadium 
at 8 p.m. 

The days activities will begin 
with a reception at noon in the 
Chrystal ballroom of the Washing- 
ton-Youree Hotel. Both State Fair 
queens, student body presidents, 
and President Arnold R. Kilpa- 
trick and President F. Jay Tay- 
lor of Louisiana Tech will attend 
the reception. 

Guests will be welcome by Den- 
nis Newbury, Student Govern- 
ment Association president, 
speaking as the representative of 
the home team. 

Next on the agenda for the re- 
ception will be a welcome speech 
by Mayor Clyde of Shreveport 
followed by brief speeches by 
the president of both colleges. 

Following Fants address, stu- 
dent body presidents will intro- 
duce the dignitaries from each 

college before the group ad- 
journs to a buffet, composed of 
small delicacies. 

The parade, one of the high- 
lights of the State Fair, will form 
on Baker Street at 1:45 p.m. The 
parade beginning at 2 p.m. will 
proceed down Milam Ctreet, left 
onto Edwards and down Edwards 
to Texas. The convoy will then 
proceed down Texas to McNeil 
Street into which Tech will turn. 



Tech will go down McNeil to 
Milam, turn left at Milam and pro- 
ceed to their pep rally on the 
Milam street side of the court 
house. NSC will stop on the 
Texas Street side of the Court 
House for a pep rally. 

Northwestern's State Fair 
Court will be driven in the pa- 
rade and escourted in the pre- 
game ceremonies by members of 
the Student Government Associa- 
tion. Members of the court are : 
Queen Paula Wright, Linda Craft, 
Ginger Foshee, Sue Peterson, 
Marsha Bella, Cheryl Terry, 
Brenda Wilson, Jane Holland, 
and Martha Minvielle. 

The queen and court will be 
presented to the crowd during 
the pre-game ceremones Chair- 
man of preparations for NSC 
activities at State Fair is Gaylon 
Landry. 

After the game will be activ- 
ities planned by various frater- 
nites in addition to the attraction 
of the Cate Fair itself and other 
events in the Shreveport-Bossier 
City area. 

State Fair game coupled with 
yearly crowing of queens from 
both schools has become one of 
the outstanding events in the 
northern part of the state, draw- 
ing no only college students but 
adults from all sections of the 
state. 

Saturday classes at both 
schools have been canceled in 
deference to the game and the 
mass e::dous to Shreveport. 



In a hard fought and close 
race for the office of freshman 
class president, Macon Gean 
edged out Garland Riddle by a 
vote of 309 to 306. A run-off be- 
tween David Precht and Marsha 
Bella will be held for the office 
°f vice-president. 

Precht, who in the primary 
registered a tie with Janet 
Churchman at 98 votes; came up 




Macon Gean 



to pass the leader, Marsha Bella, 
tallying a total of 263 votes for a 
15 vote lead. The run-off is to 
be held Thursday, Janet Church- 
man acquired 106 votes in the 
finals. 

A one-sided result was seen 
for the office of secretary-trea- 
surer with Marcie Fowler de- 
feating Pam Chandler with a 
margin of 407 to 198. The race 
for women's representative saw 
Fran Arnona defeat Peggy Chand- 
ler. Miss Arnona carried 229 votes 
to 136 for Miss Carriere. 

The turn out for the election, 
though larger than that of the 
first election, was still disap- 
pointing with 615 students 
speaking for a freshman enroll- 
ment of 1,800. 

The candidates will take office 
at the next student government 
meeting Monday which will also 
see the appointment of Fresh- 
man Associates. 

The dead line for application 
for the office of freshman as- 
sociate is Thursday. Louise 
Riehl and Henry Burns are co- 
chairmen of the Elections 
Board and have been in charge 
of the freshman elections. 




PnuLA. WKiGHT (fourth form left) will reign over Saturday's activities in Shreveport as Northwestern's 
State Fair Queen. Members of the court are from left: Cheryl Terry, Ginger Foshee, Linda Craft, Martha 
Minvielle, Brenda Wilson, Jane Holland, and Marsha Bella. 



■ 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 20, 1967 




An Editorial 



Demons Run Wild At State Fair 

Gayer, Hames Lead In 
Cast Of Classic Farce 



The cast has been announced 
for the College Theatre produc- 
tion of Jean Giraudoux's class- 
ical farce "Amphitryon 38," 
scheduled Nov. 16-17 as the 
second presentation of the fall 
theatre season. 

Leading the cast as Jupiter, 
the God-King who becomes 
enamoured of a mortal soldier's 
wife, is Shreveport graduate stu- 
dent Danny Gayer, a veteran of 
several College Theatre produc- 
tions. Gayer was last seen in 
1965 as Ralph Follet in "All the 
Way Home." 

The beautiful Alkmena, wife of 
General Amphitryon, will be 
played by Suzy Hames, a junior 
primary education major from 
Baton Rouge. Miss Hames is 
remembered for her award-win- 
ing title role in the spring pro- 
duction, "I Remember Mama." 

Sheri Saleff, a freshman nur- 
sing major of Roselle, New 
Jersey, will make her first col- 
lege theatre appearance as Leda 
in "Amphitryon 38." Freshman 
John E. Josephson, a Shreveport 
business administration major, 
will play Amphitryon. 

Supporting players include Ar- 
tie Visconte, a freshman psycho- 
logy major from Alexandria; 
junior speech major Kurk Simp- 
son of Leesville; junior account- 
ing major Tony Rispoli of New 
York; speech major John Braden 
of Roanoke; Alexandria speech 
major Linda Newman; Ann Stout, 
a freshman math major from 
Lake Providence; and junior 
speech major Leah Luckett of 
Natchitoches. 

Assistants to the director will 
be speech majors Barbara Gres- 
ham and Leah Luckett, both of 
Natchitoches, and Charles Ma- 
chen, a Winnfield sophomore, 
will be stage manager. 

"Amphitryon 38" will be di- 
rected by Assistant Professor 
of Speech Frank Magers, who 
will also supervise technical work 
on the produc tion. 

The original American produc- 
tion of S. N. Behrman's adapta- 
tion of Giraudoux's comedy was 
presented in 1937 with Alfred 
Lunt and Lynn Fontanne as Ju- 
piter and Alkmena. The show 
has been lauded as a sumptious 
theatrical work with glittering 
dialogue. The production calls 



for elaborate sets and special 
effects in sound and action. 

Tickets for all College Theatre 
productions may be obtained in 
the speech office or by writing: 
College Theatre Tickets, Box 
4345, NSC, Natchitoches, La. 
71457. 

Chemical Society 
Elects Officials 

The College Chemical Chapter 
held its first meeting of the fall 
semester last week in Fournet 
Hall. Joseph D. Walker, newly- 
elected president of the group, 
presided. Other officers for the 
new academic year are Vice- 
President, Kim Smith, Secretary, 
Jimmy Barnhill, and Treasurer, 
Louis Gary. 

Approved as Student Affiliates 
at the meeting were Ronnie 
Wood and Ken Cockerham; and 
as Associate Members, Don Scar- 
pinatto and Mike Stephenson. 

The Chapter plans several ac- 
tivities, including sponsorship of 
tutoring in chemistry. Those in- 
terested in taking advantage of 
the tutoring program should con- 
tact Dr. C. L. Bissell, Chapter 
sponsor, in Fournet Hall 



On Behaving Oneself At Tech 



It is with much anticipation that the 
campus awaits Tech Weekend, the most 
spirited game against the most hated 
foe at the greatest fair with the most stu- 
pendous blowout afterwards. 

Preparations for the weekend were 
underway as early as last spring when a 
fearful Shreveport Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Safety expressed a desire that the 
State Fair Game be played in the day- 
time, possibly cutting down some of the 
extensive property damage and all- 
around discord. 

The Tech-Northwestern Game re- 
mains a cover-up for students to have 
the "time of a lifetime" displaying a 
shirtsleve morality and a consideration 
for the rights of others rivalling that of 
Atilla the Hun. 

In times past, exuberant students 
have beat-up one another in a warped 
display of sportsmanship; scholars in 
times of "highest" celebration have wan- 
dered Zombielike through a whirling and 
evidently confusing State Fair; hotels 



and motels have been ransacked and 
'otherwise cleaned'out; and the State 
Fair with all of its potential for enjoy- 
ment has become not a fair but a dis- 
oriented glob of confusion; drunkeness 
not joy; and emptiness rather than real 
pleasure and enjoyment. 

Then the question comes down to 
personal decision rather than to resolve 
of an entire campus with each individual 
deciding if he wishes to have a lost week- 
end or a good time. The decision for fun 
from a substantial number of students 
might insure the continuance of the game 
in addition to a higher regard on the 
part of Shreveport citizens for this col- 
lege. 

Thus, at a game where two colleges 
are pitted one against the other, grand- 
stand against grandstand, player against 
player, eyeball to eyeball, I would urge 
that every student enjoy himself at the 
game and above all be able to lurk in the 
stands and muster a demoniacal sneer 
as we proceed to tromp Tech for the 
second time in a row. 



Grants Awarded 
Four Musicians 
For Training 

Four freshmen have been 
granted scholarships this year 
by the Natchitoches-Northwest- 
ern Symphony Society, according 
to Symphony director Dr. Joseph 
Carlucci. 

The scholarships, financed by 
season tickets sales and by con- 
tributions from patrons and spon- 
sors, are used primarily to en- 
large the orchestra's string sec- 
tions, the backbone of a sym- 
phony orchestra. In return, scho- 
larship recipients give their tal- 
ents to all rehearsals and con- 
cert appearances of the Natchit- 
oches - Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra. 

Three of the scholarship hol- 
ders will play in the orchestra's 
second violin section. Tom Jones 
of Shreveport, Paul Price of Pine- 
ville and Dickie Howell of Baton 
Rouge will all lend their talents 
to this area of the orchestra. 

The other scholarship reci- 
pient, Sam Caldwell of Shreve- 
port, is a new member of the celo 
section. 

Presently there are seven stu- 
dents on Symphony scholarships, 
according to Dr. Carclucci. These 
scholarships are part of a pro- 
gram to develop the newly-formed 
Natchitoches - Northwestern Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 



Minutes of SGA 



President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Minutes were read 
and approved. Absent were Fowler. 
Ferrera, Butler, Wicks, and Bates. Late 
were Rispoli, Lowe, Cooper and Kirk. 

Maxwell reported on the SUSGA pro- 
gress and the trip to Louisville. He 
it was a most informative session. 

Landry read a proclamation from 



Faculty Briefs 

Five faculty members, inclu- 
ding President Arnold R. Kilpa- 
trick, attended the Northwest 
Louisiana Chapter of the college's 
alumni association in Shreveport 
last week- 
Accompanying Dr. Kilpatrick 
were the Dean of the College 
Charles F. Thomas, Alumni As- 
sociation secretary Harrel Haile, 
associate director E. H. Gilson 
and head football coach Glenn 
Gossett. 

Kilpatrick addressed the group 
on the college's growth and Gos- 
sett discussed the upcoming NSC- 
Tech game. A football film was 
also shown. 



Dr. Walter J. Robinson, head 
of the Industrial Education De- 
partment, has completed writing 
and serving as consultant in the 
preparation of a detailing and 
billing coarse for the Architec- 
tural Woodworking Institute. 

The course, prepared for train- 



It's What's Happening 



Saturday, October 21 

Student Government Reception for 
Tech and NSC SGA officials, 
Crystal Ballroom, Washington- 
Youree, Shreveport, 12 noon 

Tech-NSC State Fair parade, down- 
town Shreveport, 2 p.m. 

Presentation of State Fair Queens 
and courts, State Fair Stadium, 
Shreveport, 7:45 p.m. 

NSC-Tech annual football classic, 
State Fair Stadium, 8 p.m. 

Monday, October 23 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, 6 p.m. 

Play Rehearsal, FA Theatre, all day 

Demeter Fraternity and Rodeo Club 
Meeting, SU 321, 6:30 p.m. 

Student Union Entertainment Com- 
mittee Meeting, SU 315, 4 p.m. 



Tuesday, October 24 

AAUP Meeting, SU 320, 7:30 p.m. 
Student Union Fine Arts Committee 
Meeting, SU 313, 4 p.m. 

Wednesday, October 24 

SLTA Meeting, WE Auditorium, 6:45 
p.m. 

Gift Packs Issued, SU Ballroom, 8 

a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Campus Women's Club Shrimp Boil, 

Coliseum, 6 p.m. 

Thursday, October 26 

Delta Kappa Gamma Banquet and 
Initiation, SU 241, 269, 270, 
6:30 p.m. 

Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all 
day 

Gift Pack Distribution, SU Ball- 
room, 8 to 4:30 p.m. 



Mayor Fant of Shreveport. The buffet 
will be at 12:00 Saturday at the Petro- 
leum Club. Appointments were made 
for a decorations committee for the 
Petroleum Club. 

It was reported that the songfest now 
has 14 organizations entered. Groups 
are still invited to participate. 

Work assignments were made for the 
Frosh run-off elections to be held on 
Tuesday. Committee meetings for the 
week were announced. 

Maxwell proposed and discussed the 
idea of a Travel Board as an SGA pro- 
ject. Dean Fulton informed the group 
that the college has an old board which 
could be reworked. Maxwell moved 
that the SGA, as a yearly project, re- 
vive the travel board idea. Seconded 
by Landry. Gray called for question. 
Motion carried. Pres. Newbury will ap- 
point a committee to review the pro- 
posal at a later date. 

Burns moved the meeting be ad- 
journed. Meeting adjourned. 
Respectfully Submitted, 
Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 

ing and upgrading detailers and 
billers, will be introduced to the 
Architectura,l Woodworking In- 
stitute membership at their an- 
nual meeting in Chicago next 
week. 

An apptitute test was also pre- 
pared and will be used to scre- 
en potential employees. The 
course outline a comprehensive 
study of related technical infor- 
mation required by the detailer 
and biller and includes assign- 
ments on shop drawings and a 
physical school plant. A diploma 
will be awarded to each em- 
ployee completing the dourse. 

c t I ©urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated Collegip'e 
Press 

Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson Staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann, Susie Chancey, Danny Bout- 
weU, Gail Dooley, Ray King, Gidget 
Maxwell, Jack Montgomery, Shirley 
Rutledge, Alton Sanders, Ray Stephens, 
Ed Thompson, Thomas Turner and Vir- 
ginia Ann Wooten. 



Editorilas reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Friday, October 20, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 




1A/AVC CIO CT n I I A I ITV ^ 



ALWAYS FIRST QUALITY 





DOWNTOWN 
PENNEYS 




REGISTRATION 
CONTEST FOR 

NORTHWESTERN 
STATE COLLEGE 

AND LOUISIANA TECH 

SATURDAY, OCT. 21st 





FREE! PORTABLE 

T.V.SET 

TO THE SCHOOL WITH 
THE MOST REGISTRATIONS 



3 




BACK-UP YOUR SCHOOL! 

WHEN IN SHREVEPORT, 
SATURDAY, OCT. 21st, BE SURE 
TO REGISTER AT PENNEY'S 
DOWNTOWN STORE! 



FREE ENTERTAINMENT 
AT DOWNTOWN STORE 
BEFORE THE PARADE! 



COMBO 
BAND 



COME IN AND 
HAVE SOME FUN! 



Page 4 



•j. HE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 20, 1967 




269 Graduates To Be Awarded 
Degrees In Spring Exercises 



Two-hundred and sixty-nine 
Northwestern State College sen- 
ors are candidates for graduation 
at fall commencement exercises. 

Of the total, 52 will receive de- 
grees in Arts and Sciences, 88 are 
candidates for education degrees, 
16 in nursing, 55 in business and 
58 in the graduate school. 

Northwestern's fall commence- 
ment exercises will be held Jan. 
25 in Prather Coliseum at 8 p.m. 

Candidates for graduation this 
fall are: 

Bachelor of Arts — Michael Allen, 
Bossier City; Michael Wardell, Mc- 
Dade; Ronald Allen, Vivian; Charles 
Cash, Victor M. Chaler, III, Dorothy 
F. Jordan, Irma Doherty Jordan, 
Dorathy Marie Martin, Alma Louise 
O'Con, Patricia Robicheaux, Marcia 
Troegal, Thomas B. White, Jr., Elease 
Williams, Ronald Williams, all of 
Shreveport; Catherine Ashlock, VUle 
Platte; William Bell, Colfax; Connie 
Gremball. Pollack; Elaine Bonaven- 
Gunter, Martha Hagewood, Audrey 
Holley, John Hunter, Ronald Jarrett, 
Ann McDaniel, Patricia Ramsey, San- 
dra Sanders, Kenneth Stephens, Jean- 
ette Stephens, Maxine Trichel, and 
Carl Hedleston, all of Natchitoches. 

Helen McLain, Campti; Audrey 
Burkhalter, Baton Rouge; Ronald 
•Pierce, Gjreenwell Springs; Douglas 
Charrier, Bunkie; Robert Cloud, Eliz- 
abeth; John Dousay, Oakdale; Dora 
Cryer, Fay Ruth Tubb, Pineville; 
Larry Dale DeVille, Margaret Owen, 

DEMON MARCHING LINE pictured from top to bottom are Charlotte $ alt £ r ex ™^ j^XV^^' "" 
Sullivan, Joyce Bricker, Janis Lowe, Candy Flournoy, Sandra Keen, Rodney Eikins. church Point; sue De- 

■ „ j- or • . „ ■ „ , Fee, Martha Grigg, Coushatta; Ronald 

Lynn Mandina, Sharon Stringer, and Connie Adams. Fieniken, Mansfield; James Garrett, 



Four Outstanding Symphony Programs 
Scheduled For Fine Arts This Year 



Four outstanding programs 
have been planned for the 1967- 
1968 season of the Northwestern- 
tion, which begins in November. 

Opening the season on Thurs- 
day, Nov. 2, will be the Little 
Orchestra Society of New York's 
production of "Curlew River", 
directed by Thomas Scherman. 

A religious opera, "Curlew 
River" was composed by Ben- 
jamin Britten, famous contempor- 
ary British composer. The opera 
is based on the medieval Japa- 
which tell the story of a mother 
searching for her lost child. 

The National Ballet, who per- 
formed here in 1966, will appear 
in the Fine Arts Auditorium on 
Thursday, February 8. With Fred- 
eric Franklin serving as artistic 
director, the company travels 
with scenery, costumes, a sym- 
phony orchestre, outstanding so- 
loists and a corps de ballet. 

On February 26, Roger Wil- 
liams, dubbed "Mr. Piano" by the 
nation's press, will perform a 
skillful blending of classical and 



popular music in Prather Col- 
iseum. Williams combines that 
rare mixture of musicanship and 
and showanship to make effec- 

INTRAMURAL STANDINGS 



LEAGUE 


A 




Team 


Won 


Lost 


Kappa Sigma 


5 





Sigma Tau 


4 


1 


Kappa Alpha 


3 


2 


TKE 


1 


3 


Pi Kappa Phi 


1 


3 


Canterbury Club 


1 


5 


LEAGUE 


B 




Team 


Won 


Lost 


Other 9 


5 





Wonderful Winos 


3 


1 


Pig Farmers 


3 


2 


Leesville Leaders 


2 


3 


Braves 


1 


4 


Constant Fees 





4 


LEAGUE 


c 




Team 


Won 


Lost 


Uncouths 


5 





Pas Bas Taus 


3 


2 


PEK 


2 


2 


BSU 


1 


2 


Oldies But Goodies 


1 


3 


Rajun' Cajuns 


1 


4 



tive contact with his audience. 

Completing the season will be 
a performance by the United 
States Navy Band on March 26. 
Conducted by Anthony Mitchell, 
the band is composed of more 
than 100 first-rate musicians. 
Well-known for its stirring mar- 
ches, the band also features a 
"swingphonette" section, which 
specializes in light opera and 
popular tunes. 

College students will be admit- 
ted to all these programs by their 
ID cards. 



Mary Stiles, Logansport; Noah Gibson, 
Alton Sanders, Vicki Snowden, Harvey 
Werner, Leesville; Larry Leach, Horn- 
beck. 

Herschel Harrington, Jr., Maud 
Trappey, New Iberia; Zelma Jester, 
Maria F. McMillan, Springhill; Brenda 
Rushing, Minden; Marcella McGlothen, 
Opelousas; Bonnie Methvin, Arcadia, 
Charles Mobley, Converse; Merilyn 
Roark, Mary Jo Wright. Many. 

Terry Reeves, Winnfieln; Pamela 
Scott, Jonesville; Charles Shinault, 
Jr., New Orleans; Barbara Stinson, 
Patterson; Hazel Maye Thompson, De- 
Ridder; Linda Timphony, Port Sul- 
phur, Michele Townsend, Monroe; Ken- 
neth Volentine, Urania; Rachel Wright, 
Clayton; and Lee Halsill, Longview, 
Wash. 

Bachelor of Science — Henry Bohanan, 
II, Charles Glover, R. Lee Harvill, 
Don M. O'Bier, Bossier City; Ralph 
Tyler, Benton; Mary Arnold, John 
Gregory Bradley, Laura Brown, Joe 
Callaway, Jr., Donald Calvert, Frank- 
lin Dordan, Lottie Hennigan, Victor 
Hoye, Jr., Lionel Langlois, Jr., Rich- 
ard Lindsey, William Looney, Jr., 
Bobbie Sue Miller, Judy Moncrief, 
Mary Norvell, Gerald Robbins, Rodney 
Rothenberger, Michael Sabino, Linda 
Lou Trout and Donald Turnbow, all 
of Shreveport. 

Melva Hataway, Frances Messer, 
Dry Prong; Joy Lynn Kilpatrick. 
Montgomery; Laura McCain, Colfax; 
Felix Armond, Carey Blanchard, III, 
Harold Bonaventure, David Breedlove, 
John Paul Broussard, David L. Bum- 
gardner, I. V. Butler, Jr., Olen Davis, 
Jr., Gail Douglas, Leonard Fowler, 
Jim Hollingsworth, Jimmy Jennings, 
Barbara Kelley, Mary Kelly, Herbert 
Leggett, Patricia Lindsey, Marcus 
Lites, Jr., Nelwyn Mayeaux, James 
McCrory, Jr., James Miller, George 
Mitcheli, Robert Mock, Cheryl More- 
land, Nealan Prather, Patrick Ram- 
bin, Richard Robertson, John Sills, 
Bernice Smith, Jade Smith, Raymond 
Sparks. Arthur Swanson and Griffin 
Taylor, Jr.. all of Natchitoches; James 
T. Copellar, Jr., Campti; Patsy Koonce, 
Goldonna. 

Carol Adkins, Linda Robichaux, 
Linda Sue Willis, Baton Rouge; Linda 
McDaniel, Zachary; Marie Jowers, 
Oakdale; Edd Bomar, Robin Butler, 
John Scott, Patricia Smith* James 
Stewart, Catherine Wall, all of Alex- 
andria; Rodney Thomas, Pineville; 
Sherry Bohannon, Audrey Weaver, 
Coushatta; Jerry Kemp, Mansfieid; 
William Ambler, Jr., Rosepine; Diana 
Hillman, Leesville; Thomas Jackson, 
Simpson; Maxine Perkins, Pitkin; 
Joseph Simmons, Evans. 

Douglas Lloyd. Sareptto; Dinah 
Percy, Minden; Judith Byles, Michael 
Tarver, Many; Johnny Falcon, Zwolle; 
Wilda Goss, Richard Lombard, Flor- 
ien; Hugh H. Hardee, Donald Wells, 
Pleasant Hill; Russell Wendt. Dodson; 
Tommy Champlin, Jonesville; Wilbert 
Trisler, Mayna; Robert Wood, George 
Yeomans, New Orleans; Ted Milner, 
DeRidder; Ronald L. Roy, Port Sul- 
phur; Juanita Dow, West Monroe; 
Rebecca Beckham. Farmerville; Mary 
Chabreck, Lacombe; Phillip Creel, 
Franklinton; Edward Dcumangue, 
Houma; Paulette Harp, Bonita; Dickie 
Jester, Kathryn Rogers. Jennings; 
Sherryl Short, Winnsboro. 

Kenneth Brooks, Texas City, Tex.; 



Richard Gamba, Valley Stream. N.Y.; 
Kin-Yung Li, Kowloon, Hong Kong, 
Costa Sclavounds. Montgomery, Md.; 
Steven Shine, Santa Paula, Calif.; 
Anthony Ward, Dublin, Ireland; James 
Winfree, Tenaha, Tex. 

Bachelor of Music — Richard B. Smith, 
Bogue Chitto, Miss. 

Bachelor of Music Education — Bo- 
berta D. Calloway, Shreveport. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing — 
Thomas Cook, PhUip Mason, Harriett 
Scott, Joseph Trahan, Jr., and Diane 
Vass, all of Shreveport; Carolyn Lind- 
say Baker; Julie Garvin, Alexandria; 
Ruth West, Pineville; Judith Wallis, 
Suzanne Garic, New Orleans; Mary 
Elias, Monroe; Nell Picou, Houmi; 
Joyce Dean Lairsay, Elizabeth Mose- 
ley, Ruston; Cynthia Smith, Amite; 
and Lanien Clark, Georgetown, S.C. 

Master of Arts — Emilia Griffith. 
Shreveport; Carol Curtis, Ursula Wal- 
ker, Natchitoches; Ronnie Clayton, 
Arthur Poe, Alexandria; Alan Pinkus, 
Pineville; Linda Hansford, Doyline; 
Jimmie Teague, Haynesville; Lewis 
Cole, Hornbeck; John Thorn, Bossier 
City; Velma Barrett, Elliott Goldman 
Christable Tapo, Karen Ward, all of 
Shreveport; Hyams John Baptiste, 
Natchitoches; Dorothy Lee, Glenmora; 
Wayne Owens, Simpson; Carol Peter- 
son, Patsy Ruth Reid, Winnfield. 

Master of Education — Gerald Reis- 
inger, Bossier City; Patrick Harrington, 
Lueburda Myers, MUly Sale, Margetta 
Stoddard, Nelta Smart, all of Shreve- 
port; Roberta Duffy, Montgomery; 
Anne Allen, Jerry Allen, Robert Bos- 
well, Daniel Walsh, Jr., all of Natchit- 
oches; Leon Riggs, Boyce; Patsy Car- 
penter, Calvin; Sarah Mitchell. Poncha- 
toula; Lynwood Hargrave, Kaplan; and 
Joyce Head of Midland, Tex. 

Master of Science — Virginia Boyd, 
Shreveport; Larry Arthur, Minyon 
Bond, John Bryan, Mirta Crawford, 
Donald Harris, Shu-ching Ho, Eliza- 
beth Jones, Richard Wilson, all of 
Natchitoches; Clarence Brown, Pine- 
ville; Chin-Kwong Ko. Hong Kong; 
James Lawton, Denton, Tex., Paul 
Tsing-Lin Chien, Tai-Chung, Republic 
of China. 

Master of Science in Education — 
Melvin Haire, Bossier City; Alfred 
Ready, Shreveport; Janet Howard 
Margaret Killen, Susan Taylor, aU of 
Natchitoches; Jane Drake, Coushatta; 
Hilda Ricks, Mansfield, James Skinner, 
Many. 



$xsx$><e><s><exs><s>3><s^^ 

Dean David Townsend will be 
the guest speaker at a Business 
Seminar to be held Tuesday 
night in room 316 of the student 
union building. 

Dean Townsend will speak on 
the "Free Mjjrketing Approach 
to Banking Reform." 

This will be the second in a 
series of monthly meetings for 
the business department. 

Next months guest speaker 
will be William Call. 



We're 
Demon Fans 

so 

Wreck Tech! 



SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

When Downtown Stop In And Browse Around 
117 St. Denis Phone 352-6390 



WHO ARE 

THE DEMONS? 



. . .They're the young men and women from Northwestern who will converge 
on Shreveport Saturday, October 21 for the downtown pep rally and parade 
and for the annual Tech-Northwestern football game! 

. . .They're each eligible to register for a $100.00 gift certificate which 
Selber's in Shreveport will give to a NSC student. The drawing will be at 
4:30 p.m. on the second floor, downtown. 

. . .They'll be in the downtown Hospitality Booth for Tech-Northwestern 
students on the second floor of Selber's, leading cheers and outselling the 
other team, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 




Shreveport, Louisiana 



Friday, October 20, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 





su ^ 1 lit 




LEANDER FREY, bursts forth form the chute in the recent Jena 
Rodeo. Frey is a freshman who last year earned second place in the 
national high school competition in his speciality of Bull Riding. For 
details on the Rodeo Club see story below. 



Campus Accidents 
Decrease During 
Fall Semester 

By Jack Montgomery 

Due to the supervision of our 
Campus Security and the safe 
driving habits of the students 
our student body has one of the 
lowest accident rates in compar- 
ison with many college's in the 
nation. In the first six weeks of 
school only four accidents have 
been investigated by Campus 
security and no injuries have 
been reported. 

What this implies is that only 
6/10 of 1% of our student body 
has been involved in on campus 
accidents. In the long run, this 
means that drivers on campus 
should enjoy low insurance rates 
and accident free driving for 
many years to come if their safe 
driving habits continue. 

According to Campus Security 
Chief James Lee, the two causes 
of most accidents on campus are 
improper parking and inatten- 
tion while pulling out from curbs. 
Lee said that the college is lucky 
that the majority of parking on 
campus is in lots rather than on 
the side of the streets as is the 
fact in many colleges. 

With the rising population at 
the college, the biggest need at 
the present is the need for more 
and bigger parking facilities and 
more streets. The problem of 
getting from one place to another 
on campus is at the point that 
if these needed facilities aren't 
made available, the number of 
students allowed to have cars on 
campus will have to be limited. 



Student Union Anniversay 
To Be Celebrated Oct. 28 



Next week's Homecoming will 
mark the first anniversary of the 
new Student Union that opened 
last year with a gala dance in the 
Ballroom and cafeteria area. Re- 
creational facilities went into op- 
eration less than two months 
later on Dec 5. 

Robert Wilson, Director of the 
Student Union, expresses his sat- 
isfaction with this year's prog- 
ress. He believes that the Union 
has truly served as the center of 
student activity on campus. The 
ballroom serving as the location 
of most of the school dances. 

The various conference rooms 
have been the scene for meetings 
and discussions of the various or- 
ganizations on campus. 

Students have frequented the 
reading rooms where a large 
number of magazines are avail- 
able for their reading pleasure.. 
Also at their disposal are over 
$1000 worth of stereo equipment 
and numerous record albums. 



The cafeteria is filled to cap- 
acity at lunch time and is visited 
throughout the day by students 
coming in for snacks. It also of- 
fers catering service to any group 
or organization on campus 

The game area and bowling 
alley have been very successful 
with various tournaments held 
held in the past year and sveral 
more coming up soon. 

The barber shop and the beau 
ty shop, because of their practi- 
cal location, have proven very 
useful.. Both are well staffed 
and under new management. 

Most of the employees of the 
Student Union are students them- 
selves working on the student 
Wilson and Lynn Hargrave, pro- 
gram director, work with six 
commitees of students who offer 
suggestions and advice con- 
concerning what will make the 
Student Unio|n more beneficial 
to the student body. 

Wilson hopes that the coming 



year will bring about any 
necessary improvements, and that 
more students will make use of 
the many facilities available to 
them in thoir Student Union. 

Demons 
Number 5 
In the Nation 



(A.P.) 



NEW— 

FIND 



Football is a temporary thing. 
Only Christ is eternal. 
Nevertheless, WRECK TECH! 




Sunday School — 9:40 a.m. 
College Choir — 5:30 p.m. 
Training Union — 6:30 p.m. 

Worship Services — 8:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 7:30 p.m. 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

508 Second Street 
Dr. James E. Carter, Pastor 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

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aid. worth over $500 million, to permit 
students to easily and quickly locate 
scholarships for which they qualify. 

• The student fills out a detailed, con- 
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ECS, with a one-time computer-proces- 
sing fee of $15. In seconds the compu- 
ter compares his qualifications against 
requirements of grants set up by foun- 
dations, business, civic, fraternal, re- 
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and prints a personalized report to 
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on scholastic standing or financial need. 

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Eyes Right! 

With Bill Burris 



Cadet Louis T. Holmes has 
been accepted in the Army ROTC 
advanced course at Northwestern. 
Cadet Holmes received the last 
position offered in the U. S. 
Army's quota of the college's 39 
cadets. 

Holmes and the other college 

Student Songfest 
Pbntied Nov. 30 

Plans are currently being put 
into action by the Student Gover- 
nment for the all-college song- 
fest to be held November 30. 

The songfest committee, head- 
harded by Ellen McPherson, 
after much hard work and plan- 
ning has secured committments 
from every fraternity and soror- 
ity, two religious organizations, 
and two other campus organiza- 
tions. 

Tickets will be placed on sale 
at a future date to be announced. 
Trophies will be given to the win- 
ners of each division in the com- 
petition. 

The idea for the initiation of 
the songfest came from McNeese, 
where the event has been a main- 
stay for several years. 




PRESIDENT KILPATRICK, 

IF WE WIN THE TECH 
GAME SATURDAY NIGHT, 
WILL WE BE GIVEN AN 
EXTRA DAY OFF FOR 
THANKSGIVING???? 



cadets have successfully complet- 
ed the Basic Course and fulfilled 
the requirements to enter the ad- 
vanced course. 

The ROTC advanced course en- 
ables college students to be- 
come officers in the U. S. Army- 
while continuing their education. 
These young men also receive $50 
compensation per month while 
enrolled in this course. 

Cadets Don Gaddis, Tom Mc- 
Collough, William Lalond, and 
John Hall have also been acepted 
in the program under the two- 
year plan authorized by the 
ROTC. 

Cadet Ronnie Donald Schilling, 
chosen for his scholastic ability, 
has received an ROTC Scholar- 
ship this fall under the Vitaliza- 
tion Act of 1964. 



Co. Executives 
Hold Interviews 

Two industrial company ex- 
ecutives will interview students 
next week in the college place- 
ment office, SU room 223. 

On Tuesday, a representative 
of Texas Eastern will conduct 
interviews with senior math and 
accouhting majors. 

Wednesday, a Firestone rep- 
resentative will interview account 
ing majors. 

Anyone wishing to schedule 
an interview with the company 
the placement office phone 
357-5621 or 357-5622. 



Wreward. 



Wrangler! 
Wremember, 
the "Wis silent. 

fick up Wrangler jean* for their 
lean, rangy look and get a 
reward — Wranglok*, the wrin- 
fclefighter finish. It means neat 
net* forever, ironing never, 
Many great jean colors and 
fabrics to choose from. These 
new wide wale corduroys. 
$6.95. The Mr. Wrangler* hi- 
roll hopsack shirt. $5.00. Every- 
thing wears better because 
{there's KODEL* in it-a muscle 
blend of 50% Kodel poly 
•stec/50%. combed cotton. p 




Gibson's Discount Store 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 20, 1967 



Water Club Elects 
Officers For '68 




Volleyball Team. Wins 
Annual Tournament 



NORA REDMOND of Alexandria (top left) has been elected publicity 
chairman of the Neptune Club. Other officers chosen for the coming 
year are (left to right) Tookie Brauchaus of Elton, secretary- 
treasurer: Linda Bordelon of Shreveport, president; and Dick Martin 
of Bogalusa, vice-president. 

Unbeaten Demons 
Face Tech Saturday 




By Bobby Ardoin 

As the appointed hour of the 
annual gruelling, Gulf States 
Conference gridiron grudge bat- 
tle between the Demons and the 
Bulldogs of Ruston draws nearer, 
head coach Glenn Gossett and his 
formidable football eleven are 
contemplating just what to ex- 
pect from Saturday night's some- 
times confusing opponent. 

Many observers will note that 
coach Gossett's reasons for being 
perplexed are justified since the 
Tech team has lost to former GSC 
cellar dwellers as McNeese and 
USL, and then suddenly come 
back by turning the tables on 
seventh-ranked Arkansas State 
last week 6-3. 

Another problem which the 
Purple and White will encounter 
is what will be the outcome when 
their much - heralded, well- 
balanced offensive attack faces 
the respected, stingy defense of 
the Canines. 

Last weekend, the staunch Tech 
defense stopped the Indians cold 
by allowing their normally free- 
moving offense only a field goal. 

On the other hand, the some- 
times erratic Demon pass de- 
fense will have to come up with 
a superior effort Saturday night 
in order to stop the deadly aim 
of Bulldog quarterbacks Terry 
Bradshaw, Phil Robertson, and 
Truman Meissner. 

This signal calling trio has rid- 
dled the enemy defensive second- 
ary for a total of 526 yards in 
four games. 

Of the three, Bradshaw has 
proved most effective connecting 
on 24 of 48 passes for 298 yards. 
His aerial accuracy has provided 
the Tech team with two touch- 
downs. 

Although the Tech air depart- 
ment seems to be their biggest 
offensive weapon, the Bulldog 
rushing onslaught may give the 
Demon defense a number of head- 
aches, as they have found holes 
in their opponent's forward walls 
for 573 yards. 

Leading ground gainers are 
halfbacks Robert Brunet, and 
Buster Herren, and fullback Bub- 
ba Sanchez. Brunet is the leading 



Tech charger with 180 yards, fol- 
lowed by Herren with 178. 

On the other hand, by glancing 
at the Demon season statistical 
chart, one can't help but notice 
their impressive performances 
thus far, and would have to rea- 
lize that the Tech defense will 
have their night's work cut out 
for them. 

The potent Demon attack has 
rushed for an astounding total 
of 1,191 yards and have gone to 
the airways for another 275. 

The ball control philosophy of 
Gossett and his assistants seem 
to have been the right prescrip- 
tions for their pre-season ail- 
ments, as the Demon ball car- 
riers have averaged better than 
375 yards per game. 

Victor Nyvall, the sophomore 
halfback from Kilgore, Tex., has 
gained 231 of these markers to 
lead the Demons in this depart- 
ment. Nyvall has accumulated a 
7.1 yard per carry total, and is 
followed by Kenny Callens with 
a 5.5 norm. 

Donald Guidry, the junior sig- 
nal caller from Church Point is 
third in the rushing department 
with 157 yards gained. Alwyn 
Phillips is next with 144. 

However, in grudge games and 
ancient rivalries such as the one 
in State Fair Stadium Saturday 
night, the season statistics and 
the record books might as well 
be diregarded. 

Only two short years ago, the 
Demons swept in on the crest of 
four straight victories against a 
Tech team that owned none, and 
after the crowd left the stadium, 
the previously winless Tech team 
had routed the Demons 42-14. 

Saturday night the Demons 
have an unblemished record of 
14 victories and a national title 
to protect, while the Bulldogs 
will be trying to avenge last 
year's 28-7 humiliation. The 
question in the minds of coach 
Gossett and the players is wheth- 
er or not they can overcome a 
possible attack of complacency, 
and avoid the penalties that cost 
them so dearly in the Pensacola 
game. 



The Women's volleyball team 
swept to victory in both divisions 
of the third annual NSC Wo- 
men's Invitational Tournament 
held here this weekend. 

In the A Division, the Demons 
had to go three matches before 
beating Memphis State for the 
title, and won two straight over 
McNeese for the B Division 
championship. 

Centenary's girls were elimi- 
nated by the University of South- 
western Louisiana in the second 
round of the B Division play. 

The Demons reached the finals 
of the B Division by defeating 
LSU Alexandria in the opening 
round, and USL in the semi- 
finals. 



The team will travel to Mem- 
phis on Nov. 17 to compete in a 
tournament comprised of ten 
teams from areas all over the 
South. 

Members of this years squad 
are Phyllis Love, Julia Parker, 
Judy Hillman, Judy Bright, Mary 
Louviere, and Laura McCain. 

Those of the B squad are Jane 
Green, Fern Martin, Pat Tauzin, 
Debbie Krain, Naomi Monk, 
Diane Thomas, Marcia Elkins, 
Dotty Lonadier, and Charlene 
Gallo. 

WRECK 
TECH! 



Preparations for the Neptune 
club's annual water show are now 
underway, according to Miss 
Joyce Hillard, coach of the col- 
lege swimmers, and Linda Borde- 
lon, newly elected president of 
the organization. 

Miss Bordelon and the club's 
three other officers were chosen 
recently by the 25-member club. 
Heading the organization this 
year is Dick Martin, vice-presi- 
dent; Tooky BraucHaus, secre- 
tary-treasurer; and Norma Red- 
mond, publicity chairman. 

Dec. 7 and 8 have been set as 
the dates for the Neptune's an- 
nual Water Show in the college 
natatorium, states Miss Hillard. 
The show's theme, according to 
the swimming instructor, will be 
chosen at the Neptune Club's 
next meeting. 




New 

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Friday, October 20, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Demon Thinclads Host Wreck Tech 



From Down Under Long Distance Event 



With Jay Keppel 



52 Hours to Kick-Off 

That annual affair known to all of us as the State Fair 
Game is now but 52 hours away (as of 4 p.m. Thursday). The 
game which is so important to every true Demon or Tech fan 
becomes a reality this week for the 52nd time in the tradition- 
soaked rivalry. 

What causes the innate excitement enshrouding the con- 
test and the atmosphere at Shreveport? What transforms the 
entire scene into a fantasyland of color. . .of majesty. . .of dis- 
appointment? 

Particularly for the benefit of those who have never wit- 
nessed this sports spectacle, we will delve into the realm of 
State Fair, and pass along a few observations about what to 
expect on the field of action, the fairgrounds, and the city it- 
self. 



'Wreck Tech' 



'Damn the Demons' 



Immediately upon arrival in Shreveport, one becomes 
increasingly conscious of his school affiliation. This aware- 
ness grows with each passing hour to a fever pitch of frenzy, 
until one finds himself wildly cheering with the masses in the 
35,000-seat State Fair Stadium Saturday evening. Everywhere 
one goes, whether to a drive-in restaurant, a hotel, or a bar- 
room, the ominous chants and placards proclaiming "Wreck 
Tech" or "Dam the Demons" (depending on which side of the 
fence you're on) blare forth in violent confusion. 

One feels the element of school pride swelling within, 
until restraint is vanquished — victory at all costs! This is the 
battle cry. . .this is the real meaning of the ancient game and 
the rituals surrounding it. . .this and this alone. . .VICTORY! 

Make It or Break It 

Let us quickly analyse this game from both points of 
view. For the Demons, a loss would more or less destroy in 
one full swoop the football dynasty that has taken the whole 
of one season and parts of two others to build. Out of the 
trophy case would go our national prestige, and, worst of all, 
our impetus. 

The Demons, in short, have everything to lose, or every- 
thing to gain. It is indeed a precarious perch. 

On the other hand, we present La. Tech. The Canines 
have a so-so 2-2 record thus far. The two losses were both in 
conference play, thereby eliminating them for all practical 
purposes from the Gulf States Conference race. Their last 
week's victory over Arkansas State (who was ranked No. 7 
by A. P.) was a thing of beauty. They will be very high — the 
Demon game will be a sort of redemption, a reprieve, a 
chance to make or break their 1967 season. 

Unlike the Demon team, they can readily afford to toss 
caution to the wind, they needn't worry about taking extra- 
ordinary chances, they have absolutely nothing to lose, but 
See From Down Under, page 8 



The Demon cross country thin- 
clads will host their second long 
distance event tomorrow after- 
noon with a quadrangular meet 
beginning in front of the Men's 
Gymn at 5 p.m. 

Team competition in tomor- 
row's meet will include runners 
from a number of schools in the 
GSC. Those entered in the com- 
petition are Northeast, La. Tech, 
and Southern State. 

Tomorrow's runners will en- 
counter a 3.8 mile course in a 
circular pattern around the per- 
imiter of the campus. After leav- 
ing the starting line at the Gym, 
the sprinters will circle the area 
around the Coliseum twice, and 
continue up the boulevard border- 
ing the lake. 

After completing this segment 
of the Veterans Apartments and 
proceed up the street as far as 
the Frame Dormitories where 
they will turn right and run up 
the street flanking the New Men's 
Dorm. Completion of the course 
will be at the Gym. 

Assisting head track coach John 
Thompson in the instruction this 
year is former Demon track squad 
member Bob Dufalo of New 



Jersey. Dufalo will handle the 
long distance squad in addition 
to working on his degree. 

In their first outing last Thurs- 
day afternoon, the Demon dis- 
tance runners tasted defeat at the 
hands of Southeastern, coming 
out on the short end of the scor- 
ing 42-16. 

The Lions from Hammond took 
top honors by capturing the first 
four places in the event with 
Pete Schlazzo being clocked with 
a winning time of 19:42. 

Taking fifth place in the event, 
and first overall for the Demon 
squad was Millard Mangram of 
Shreveport with a time of 20:50. 
Next in the point column for the 
Demons was Dolon Cooper of 
Minden who placed sixth in the 
event with a time of 22:05. Others 
placing in the event were John 
Whitehead of Jena, and Henry 
Long of Winnfield. 

A total of eight members form 
this year's squad Besides those 
already mentioned, those com- 
posing the team are Paul Weller 
of Wareham, Mass., Paul True- 
man of Cold Springs, Minn., and 
Buddy Durban of Haughton. 



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Plans For Graduate N Club Track Meet 
Announced By Director Walter Ledet 



IMAGINE??... 

A FREE 
LESSON 
IN EYE 
MAKE-UP 



Dates have been announced for 
the fourth annual Graduate N 
Club indoor track meet at North- 
western State College. 

Walter Ledet, president of the 
NSC Graduate N Club and meet 
director, said the indoor meet will 
be held Feb. 23-24 in Prather 
Coliseum. 

The first indoor track meet 
established in Louisiana, the NSC 
trackfest had 55 high schools 
from five states and 14 college 
and open teams represented last 
Febrauary. 

For the second straight year, 
the Prather boards will be cov- 
ered with grasstex, which reduces 
chances of injury to the athletes 
and gives them a better oppor- 
tunity to turn in their best times 
and distances. 



The high school division will 
be held Feb. 23 with competition 
in the 60 yard dash, 60 yard high 
hurdles, 440 yard dash, 880 yard 
run, mile run, high jump, broad 
jump, shot put, pole vault, four 
lap relay, 16 lap relay and the 
mile relay. 

On Feb. 24 the college cinder- 
men take over the spacious con- 
fines of Prather Coliseum. The 
collegians will compete in the 
same events as the prep thin- 
clads, with the exception of the 
16 lap relay, and have a two mile 
run and two mile relay, which 
are not held in the high school 
division. 

Ledet said that the 1968 NSC 
indoor meet is expected to be 
bigger and better than any pre- 
vious Graduate N Club festival. 




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KNOC Live Action Sports 



KNOC AM & FM presents all DEMON 
football, basketball and baseball games 
at home and away. This activity is broad- 
cast as a service to sports fans and as a 

"THE VOICE OF NORTHWEST- 
ERN". . .for the past 13 years, 
Norm Fletcher follows the Dem- 
ons at honie and on the road. An 
alumnus of NSC, he is co-owner 
and manager of KNOC AM-FM & 
TV CABLE. He was "Young Man 
of the Year" in 1958 and "Man of 
the Year" in 1960 in Natchitoches 
Parish. . .a three-time President of 
the Chamber of Commerce. . .local 
Civil Defense Director. . .active in 
religious and civic groups and 
state CD work. . .Air Force vete- 
ran, .former editor-in-chief of the 
FAR EAST NETWORK NEWS 
BUREAU in Tokyo. Was Student 
Body President and Mr. NHS, foot- 
ball and basketball standout at 
Natchitoches High School, where 
he started sportscasting while a 
Senior, after suffering a knee 
injury. 



continuing salute to the NSC Athletic 
Heritage, sponsored by members of the 
NSC Radio Booster Club. 





Another VOICE OF THE DEMONS, 
Jim HAWTHORNE is Sales Mana- 
ger of KNOC AM-FM. He has been 
sharing some of the DEMON action 
mikeside for five years, during 
which time he was employed full 
time while attending NSC. He 
earned his BA in Speech last Jan- 
uary. While attending NSC, Haw- 
thorne was active in drama work, 
earning the "Edna" award for Best 
Supporting Actor in "THE GLASS 
MENAGERIE"; worked with the 
Current Sauce on special features, 
and earned a letter in dramatics 
while a member of NSC's "THE 
DAVIS PLAYERS." Hawthorne 
was a school leader and excelled 
in all the athletic programs while 
attending Anacoco High School. He 
handled the DEMON baseball 
games last year, home and away, 
on KNOC-FM. 



Win -Lose -Draw -Support Your DEMONS. 
PATRONIZE YOUR BOOSTER CLUB MEMBERS 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 20, 1967 




Student Gift Packages 
Can Be Obtained In SU 



(photo by Ed Thompson) 

GRAVY TRAIN ! ! ! ! a lonely truck bearing the name of a national dog food manufacturer steathily 
backs into the rear of St. Denis dining hall with some cargo unknown to human imagination. The staff 
of the Current Sauce wonders if the food on campus is going to the dogs. 



From Down Under— 

(Continued from page 7) 
rather everything to gain. 

The Bulldogs have a habit of copping the hallowed game. 
The overall 33-14-4 series record attests to this. Tech won 
the first meeting in 1907 by a score of 45-0. Then, in 1937, the 
official State Fair Series began, replacing Arkansas versus 
Louisiana State. The Techmen got that one, too, 14-0. For 
Tech, salvation comes against NSC, will it in '67? 

Last week's column bore out the rest of the Demon's 
frustrations. Perhaps because we usually enter the game with 
a fine record to that date, the pressure is always on us, thereby 
equalizing the teams. 

Beguiling Behavior 

On the editorial page of this issue, can be found an inter- 
esting though idealistic approach to Tech Week-End. Al- 
though we agree that each student should attempt to display 
his finest attributes, we do believe that this "fun morality" is 
somewhat eclipsed by the gaity of seething mob-rule that gov- 
erns the entire world of State Fair. From the midway barkers 
bellowing about side-show freaks to the Mardi Gras atmos- 
phere of the famed "Bossier Strip," everywhere the opposing 
elements interact. It is almost unreal. 

A note: remember just what we, the spectators owe the 
men on the field Saturday — what they do there represents 
what each of us has at heart. They are battling for our inter- 
ests. Bring whatever "spirits" you'd like to the game, but 
bring real spirit, too — not a superficial, drunken spirit, but a 
sincere desire for a victory. . .and make that spirit obvious 
to our players. 

Season's Score ... 13-14 

After another disasterous picking session last week, we 
sought anew to find another prognosticator. This time we 
succeded. Our guest wishes to remain anonymous, but we will 
say that this person has a method based loosely on horoscopes. 
Therefore there will be no comments (except on the one score 
FDU is offering) about the game since all results are virtual 
gifts from the heavens. 
FDU's prediction on NSC-TECH 

Northwestern 21, Tech 20 (Sentiment gives Demons the 
Nothing can be taken for granted.) 

GUEST PICKER 

NSC 21 - LA. TECH 17 

Northeast 17 - Southeastern 9 

McNeese 10 - Lamar Tech 7 

Memphis State 25 - Southwestern 9 

San Francisco 30 - New Orleans 14 

LSU 35 -Kentucky 10 

Air Force 18 - Tulane 7 

Miss. College 17 - La. College 15 

Maxwell Elected Girl Of The Month 
At Weekly Euthenics Club Meeting 

The Euthenics Club held its 
weekly meeting Thursday night 
in the living room of the Home 
Economics Building to select 
the Club's Girl of the Month. 

Chosen this month was Diane 
Maxwell, who was cited for aid- 
in the club in various projects 
throughout the past weeks. 

Featured speakers at the 
meeting were Mrs. Easley and 
Mrs. Lambre who presented an 
interesting program on the "Art 
of Decoupage." 

Janice Shriver, the club pu- 
blicity chairman conducted the 



meeting due to the absene of 
Shoron Shaffer. 

Officers for the 1967-68 term 
are: Sharon Shaffer, president; 
Cathy Nelson, 1st vice-president; 
Duphona Smith, 2nd vice presi- 
dent; Kathy Gatlin, secretary; 
Jennifer Jones, treasurer; Eve- 
lyn Lord, co-treasurer; Nan Roser 
and Janice Shriver, publicity 
chairmen; Judy Stiles, parlia- 
mentarian; Sandra Almon, his- 
torian; Louise Riche, state officr; 

The club's theme this year is 
"Focus On Creativity In Home 
Economics," and will be carried 
out in activities during the year. 



WRECK TECH 



In yet another of its services 
to the student the Student Union 
has taken charge of the distri- 
bution of gift packages to every 
student on and off-campus Thurs- 
day and Friday from 8 a.m. to 
4 p.m. 

Through the administration of- 
fices of the Deans of Men and 
Women, certificates will be dis- 
trubuted to each student on the 
campus. Each certificate may be 
redeemed for a gift package 
Thursday or Friday in the Stu- 
dent Union Ballroom. 

Students living off-campus may 
pick up their packs and the infor- 
mation book in the Student 
Union. 

Contained in these packages 
will be some of the elementary 
articles of everyday living which 
each student will need. Included 
will be Safeguard soap, Head and 
Shoulders shampoo, Excedrin 
tablets, Ban deodorant, Vitalis 
hair dressing, Pepsodent tooth- 



Cane Theatre 

-NOW SHOWING - 



THERE EXISTS NOW 
A PLACE THAT IS ILLEGAL 
IN MOST OF THE WORLD... 

WHERE YOU WILL SEE 

THE KICK SET- 
WILD SET -WEIRD SET! 



BY order of the SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF 
CALIFORNIA the producers are prohibited from 

USING IN THE ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION OF "SPREE' 
THE NAMES AND PHOTOS OF CERTAIN WELL KNOWN 
HOLLYWOOD STARS. 

FOR THIS SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT 'SPREE' WILL BE SHOWN 
WITH EVERY SCENE INTACT EXACTLY AS PH OTOGRAPHED. 




tcreen play by SYDNEY FIELD .directed by MICHEL IEISEN • WALON GREEN 



COLOR 



Sunday-Monday-Tuesday 



20th Century 



Fox presents 



6 lines x 2 col. (12 lines) 2 cols, x Vi inch 

2 °lh Cent, 




MAT— 206 




Panavision* 
Color by Oeluxe 



Starts Wednesday 



The Funniest Family Outing 
of the Year! 



WALT DISNEY 

presents 



Starring 

WALTER 




Those -uary poppins- kids 
MATTHEW KAREN 



BR EMN AN • LowEii ■ garbeb - dotrice „, WYN N ^i^fesfer', 

DOORMAN WANTED 



paste, and some literature which 
should prove helpful to each stu- 
dent 

The paskages will be limited to 
one per student. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

— Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
| Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Tonight and 
Saturday 

Julie's Back 
and look who's 
with her — 
James Garner 
Juli Andrews 
Melvin Douglas 
James Coburn 

"EMILY" 

(Formerly "The 
Americanization of 
Emily) 

Starts Sunday 

Nato Fall Film 
Fair PJcture 

"HOUR OF 
THE GUN" 

James Garner 
i Jason Robards 
Robert Ryan 
Color 




Clint Eastwood 
"A FISTFULL 
OF DOLLARS" 

Color 

Saturdday 

Elke Sommer 

"THE VENETIAN 
AFFAIR" 
-Co-Feature- 
Alec Guinness 
"HOTEL 
PARADISO" 

Both In Color 

Sun-Mon-Tues 

Sean Connery 
Is James Bond 
In 

"YOU ONLY LIVE 
TWICE" 

Color 

Wednesday 
Buck Nite 

Peter Sellers 
'AFTER THE FOX' 

-Co-Feature- 
Natalie Wood 

"SEX AND THE 
SINGLE GIRL" 

Both In Color 



Expansion 



See Page 4 




urrent 



s 



auce 



Enrollment 



See Page 8 



Vol. LVI— No. 10 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Friday, October 27, 1967 



Homecoming To Headline 'Progress' 



Organizations 
In Competition 

Right now hundreds of ener- 
getic students in some twenty 
organizations and dormitories are 
adding the finishing touches to 
displays that they hope will take 
the $100 first place price in the 
campus' Homecoming Decoration 
contest. 

Six dormitories, five fraterni- 
ties, four sororities, two religious 
centers and two other college 
groups are creating displays in 
keeping with this years' Home- 
coming theme, NSC — "A Picture 
of Progress." 

Best overall entry in the contest 
will win the $10o first prize 
while members in each of the 
four categories, residence halls, 
social, religious and special 
groups, will also be competing 
for the $50 cash awards in each 
division. 

It is possible, according to Lu- 
cile Hendrick, dean of women and 
chairman of the decoration com- 
mittee, to win both the first 
grand prize and a second place 
award. 

Judging of exhibits and dis- 
plays by a collegiate faculty com- 
mittee is scheduled for 8 to 9 a.m. 
tomorrow and announcing of the 
five prize winners for tomorrow 
afternoon. 

Those competing in the col- 
lege's decoration contest are 
Natchitoches, Prudhomme, East 
Sabine North Sabine Halls; Kap- 
pa Alpha and Phi Mu, Kappa Sig- 
ma, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Tau 
Gamma, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Al- 
pha, Delta Zeta, Sigma Kappa, 
Sigma Sigma Sigma; Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, Wesley Foundation; 
Davis Players, Associated Women 
Students and Associated Men Stu- 
dents and Blue Key and Purple 
Jackets. 

Medieval Intro 

'Curlew River 
Opera To Tell 
Tragic Story 

The Northwestern-Natchitoches 
Concert Association will open 
its 1967-68 season Thursday even- 
ing with Benjamin Britten's 
"Curlew River," a short opera 
presented by the Little Orches- 
tra Society of New York. 

The opera, an adaptation in 
Christian terms of a Japanese 
"No-play," Sumidagawa, begins 
in the style of Medieval England 
religious drama, and later reveals 
exciting costumes and masks 
modeled after those used in Japa- 
nese ritual celebrations. 
"Curlew River" will be present- 
ed in the Fine Arts Auditorium 
Thursday at 8 p.m. Students will 
he admitted by their ID cards; 
admissions at the door will be 
S4 for adults and $2 for children. 

The opera features an all-male 
cast, and tells the tragic story 
of a deranged women looking for 
her lost son and learning of his 
fate from the Ferryman crossing 
Curlew River. The work will be 
Presented by five soloists, a male 
chorus and an instrumental en- 
semble. 

The touring company soloists 
include tenor Kenneth Riegel as 
'he Madwoman; baritone William 
Metcalfe as the Ferryman; Metro- 
politan Opera baritone John 
Robert Dunlap as a Traveller; and 
oass John West, who has sung 
with opera companies in Houston, 
San Francisco, New Orleans, and 
Shreveport. 




HOMECOMING ROYALTY. . . .1967 Homecoming Queen Martha Minville (center) is surrounded by her 
court chosen by the "N" Club. The Queen and her eleven maids will be presented at pre-game ceremonies 
at 2:10 p.m. tomorrow in Demon Stadium and will reign over the day's festivities. Members of the 
court are (seated, left to right) Carol Cook, Queen Martha, Dianne Gilbert, (standing, left to right) 
Allyson McLaurin, Suzanne Charbreck, Sada Martin, Rita Johnson, Jean Mills, Tenita Fort, Anna Dell 
Creel, Louise Loupe and Pam Dunn. 



The Al Dodd Story 



An Interview With A Bear 



By John Keppel 

Ever wonder what it would be 
like to dine with a real celebrity 
at an elaborate, expensive res- 
taurant? What it must be like to 
have the establishment's person- 
nel at your beck and call? To 
hear other people in the room 
whisper, "Look, there's !" 

Four Current Sauce staff mem- 
bers found out what it was like 
last week during our four-day stay 
in "The Windy City" ofr the 1967- 
68 Associated Collegiate Press 
Journalism Convention. The night 
before we left for home we spent 
a delightful evening with a mem- 
ber of the Chicago Bears football 
team — no, not Gale Sayers, but 
our own beloved Al Dodd and 
his pretty and charming wife 
Kathy. 

We called Al the day we ar- 
rived in Chicago, and he made 
reservations for the six of us at 
the 181 Sirloin House, an exclu- 
sive place with a less-than-gaudy 
atmosphere. We arrived about 
7:30 p.m., began with cocktails, 
ordered our entrees, and the inter- 
view was on. 

We asked what professional 
football training camps are really 
like. 

Weeding The Rookies 

"Well, I arrived in camp on the 
17th of July, and we had contact 
that morning. We had to get ready 
to play the College All-Stars ten 
days later in a game-type scrim- 
mage. Our coaches used about 
half of the drills we had in col- 
lege, and added many new ones 
of their own." 

Al told us that there had been 
more than 100 rookies in July, 
and that only eight had survived. 
Of that number, only four, Al in- 
cluded, were active players. 

Al related his experiences in 
his first exhibition game against 
the Washington Redskins, in 
which he played against his for- 
mer Demon teammate, Dick Red- 
ing. 

" 'Hey, Dick, T yelled across 
the line of scrimmage ' I'm gonna 



have to cover you this time — can't 
afford to let you catch any passes, 
now can I?' 

" 'That's okay, Al,' Reding call- 
ed back, 'you realize I'll have to 
hit you on this play.' 

"Man, that was strange, I mean, 
playing against a guy you'd play 
ed with for so many years." 

We covered Al's present duties 
with Chicago. 

"I was lucky to make the team 
at all," he declared with more- 
than-necessary modesty, "but I 
do get a chance to play. I'm the 
deep safety on punt returns, and 
I back up Gale Sayers on kick- 
offs. I'm a member of the 'bomb 
squad,' which means I play on 
extra-points and field goal at- 
tempts, all kick-offs (offensive or 
'defensive) and whenever else 
they (the coaches) are afraid of 



anyone getting hurt. I'm also a 
second-string cornerback. 

" 'I haven't done much," he 
mused, "but I did recover a fum- 
ble against Baltimore." 

There are three Louisianians 
on the Bear roster besides Al. 
They are Richie Petitibon of Tu- 
lane and Rosie Taylor and Frank 
Cornish of Grambling. An inter- 
esting note is tha all of them are 
from New Orleans. 

Controlled Violence? 

"You know what happened to 
me at camp," the former Little 
Ail-American joked. "I almost 
got fined for being overweight — 
not fat, just too heavy! I lost that 
fast though; I'm down to 185, 
which is still ten pounds more 
than last season. Heck, I would 
(See Interview, page 4) 




AL AND KATHY IN CHICAGO— The reigning "Mr. NSC" and his 
wife show off the newest member of their family, daughter Tracy 
Lynn, at their present home in Chicago. After the football season, the 
school's "Fisrt Family" will return to Natchitoches so that Al can 
finish working for his degree. 



A New Scene 
Greets Grads 

There have been some 
changes made! Thousands of 
alumni from across our state 
and the nation will converge 
on campus tomorrow for 1967 
Homecoming weekend, and 
most of them will hardly 
recognize their old Alma 
Mater. 

Cushioned seats have been 
placed in the Demon Stadium 
to make the old grads comfort- 
able for an exciting football con- 
test between our Demon team 
and the Troy State Red Wave, 
but new seats are among the 
least of the many changes on 
display. 

For many returning grads, to- 
morrow will be their first oppor- 
tunity to see the massive new 
Student City Complex, comprised 
of Rapides and Sabine Halls, 
Iberville Cafeteria and the new 
Student Union. 

Graduates will also witness the 
continuing growth on campus as 
they view the construction of the 
multi-million dollar Science Biuld- 
ing and the remodeling of Cald- 
well Hall, a college landmark and 
the oldest building on campus. 

Among the many sights to be 
seen by college alumni will be 
the clever displays and exhibits 
prepared by some twenty cam- 
pus organizations and dormitor- 
ies. All the displays are in keep- 
ing with this year's Homecoming 
theme, "NSC— A Picture of Pro- 
gress." 

Tomorrow's activities begin 
with an alumni coffee and regis- 
tration in the Union from 8 to 
11 a.m. Alumni are also sched- 
uled to tour the campus from 
9 to 11 o'clock. 

The Alumni Association's 
Board of Directors will meet at 
9:30 in the Student Union and 
Graduate "N" Club members will 
hold their annual business meet- 
ing in Prather Coliseum at 10:30. 

All alumni will be guests of 
the college for the alumni bar- 
becue at 11:30. From the barbe- 
cue, the old grads will go to the 
Demon Stadi um for the pre-game 
ceremonies and presentation of 
the Homecoming queen at 2:10. 

Queen Martha Minvielle and 
her court, Allyson McLaurin, An- 
na Dell Creel, Suzanne Chabreck, 
Joan Mills, Rita Johnston, Diane 
Gilbert, Louise Loupe, Carol 
Cook, Tenita Fort, Sada Martin 
and Pam Dunn, will reign over 
the NSC-Troy State game set for 
2:30 at Demon Stadium. 

Following the game, alumni 
will be able to visit sorority and 
fraternity houses as well as cam- 
pus religious organizations con- 
ducting Homecoming open house. 
An all-college and alumni dance, 
featuring "The Basement Wall," 
will wind up the day's activities. 
The dance, set from 8 to 12 p.m., 
will be held in the coliseum. 

All College classes after 10 a.m. 
tomorrow have been cancelled 
by President Kilpatrick in honor 
of Homecoming. 

Bookstore Time 

The College Bookstore has an- 
nounced a change in its operating 
hours. It will now open 7:30 to 
11:50 a.m. and 12:50 to 4 p.m. 
Monday thru Friday and 8 to 12 
a.m. Saturday. 



Page 2 



Friday, October 27, 1967 




Blithering 
Comes To 
College 



Blithering has finally made its mark on this campus, and 
has become for many students the only sensible answer for 
the problems of everyday. 

Since you have probably already blithered but not known 
what you were doing, Webster's Unabridged gives us com- 
mon grounds for discussion, indicating that blithering, or 
"blathering," as they spell it, is merely running off at the 
mouth to such a degree that things said approach no appreci- 
able degree of coherency. This is also evidenced by the Eng- 
lish phrase "blithering idiot." 

The phenomena of blithering has as many moods as it 
has uses. First there is the "test blither," which generally 
occurs the last few minutes before a major test. 

Not to be ignored is the "date blither," mistaken by 
many for "blizzard," though both are equally nonsensical, 
since girls are not that dumb. 

Some students have even been bold enough to attempt 
the "teacher blither," and found out that teachers are not 
that dumb, either. Whatever form of the blither you attempt, 
odds are that you are entering into a most revealing and ful- 
filling experience. 

In order that students be assured that they are not alone 
in the practice of blithering, let's look to history for other 
examples of the age-old passtime. 

It has been reported that beyond a doubt Napoleon 
blithered after the Battle of Waterloo. Reliable witnesses 
indicated that defendents often blithered at the Salem witch 
trials. Finally, many notable news services report to this pub- 
lication that President Johnson has been blithering now for 
four solid years. 

As a college student, you have the right to blither as 
much as you like to anyone you like any time you like, but 
remeber that temperance should be practiced at all times 
and that the blithering artist has a historic obligation to chan- 
nel his blithering into useful, substantial, and socially con- 
structive directions. 

Tech Football Awards 
Presented To Demons 



The weekly football awards for 
the Tech game have been pre- 
sented to the Demons who gave 
outstanding performances at Sat- 
urday's contest in Shreveport. 
These awards, presented 'on a 
graded basis of the offensive and 
defensive performances of each 
Demon, are given after the game 
film has been previewed by the 
coaches and players. 

Defensive awards went to Ger- 
ald Malley and Paul Alonzo, de- 
fensie line,, and Dav^id Smith, 
defensive back. The big play a- 
wards defensively were present- 
ed to David Lovich, Randy Tate. 
Alonzo, Mike Creel, Malley, Les- 
ter Latino, Ronnie Whatley, John 
Boogearts Sammy Clifton, Dick 
Concilio, and Smith. 



Offensively, the awards went 
to Smith, back, and Kenneth Fer- 
ro. line. The offensive award for 
the big play was presented to 
David Dawson, while the knock- 
down award went to Philip Creel. 

The defensive and offensive 
scout awards went to Bo Ryan 
and James Joyner, respectively. 

Players who have received a- 
wards for their defensive per- 
formances in the past games are 
Concilio, Whatley, Malley, Mike 
Creel, Mace Morris, Alonzo Maxie 
Branch, Walter Edler, Clifton, 
and Smith. 

Offensive awards have also 
been presented to Malcolm Lew- 
is, Tate, Vic Nyvall, Louis Rich- 
ard, David Centanni, and Russ 
Gielow. 




PROGRESS ON THE DECLINE? Ancient Caldwell looms in the background, her renovation almost com- 
plete since this photo was taken two months ago. But the towering air conditioning unit at the left is still 
dormant, and sweaty students mope about smoldering classrooms on hot days. With the welcome approach 
of winter weather come finishing touches on the building's tastefully decorated modern interior. 



Faculty Briefs 

Richard Galloway, assistant 
professor of special education, 
was featured speaker Wednesday 
and Thursday at an institute on 
counseling in Monroe. 

Administrators, educators and 
professional people from through- 
out North Louisiana attended the 
Institute on Counseling in Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation Process. 

Galloway's topic for the insti- 
tute was "Counseling and Inter- 
viewing." 

The program was sponsored by 
the Louisiana State Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. 



Three members of the North- 
western State College music fac- 
ulty attended the annual State 
Vocal Music Conference held re- 
cently on the Louisiana Tech 
campus in Ruston. 

The event is hosted each year 
by one of the state colleges and 
is jointly sponsored by the State 
Department of Education and the 
Louisiana Music Educators As- 
sociation. Outstanding speakers 
and clinicians are brought in for 
demonstrations and lectures. 

Topics covered have special 
appeal to public music teachers 
in the choral directing or class- 
room music fields, as well as to 
college music teachers in the 
area of vocal music education. 

Representing Northwestern 
were May Beville, assistant pro- 
fessor of Music Education, Mrs. 

(See Faculty Briefs, page 8) 



It's What's Happening 



Friday, October 27 

Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all 
day 

Gift Packs Issued, SU Ballroom, all 
day 

Delta Kappa Gamma Banquet and 
initiation, SU 241, 269, and 270 
Saturday, October 28 

Alumni Coffee and Registration, SU 
Ballroom, 8 to 11 a.m. 

Open House, Fraternities and Sor- 
orities, all day 

Campus Visitation by Alumni, 9-11 
a.m. 

Alumni Association Board Meeting, 
SU, 9:30 a.m. 

Graduate "N" Club Meeting, Col- 
iseum, 10:30 a.m. 

Alumni Barbecue, Coliseum, 11:30 
a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Pre game Ceremonies, Demon Sta- 
dium, 2:10 a.m. 

Football Game, NSC vs Troy State, 
Alabama, Demon Stadium, 2:30 
p.m. 



"N" Club Grads Get-Together VFW 
Home, Touline St., after the 
game 

Delta Zeta Slumber Party, DZ 
Nursing Department Coffee, SU 269- 
Monday, October 30 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, 6 p.m 
Nursing Department Coffee, SU 269, 

10:30 a.m. 
Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all 

day 

Tuesday, October 31 

Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all 
day 

House. Midnight 
270, 10 a.m. 
Nursing Department Meeting, SU 
315, 10:30 a.m. 
Wednesday, November 1 

Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all 
day 

Thursday, November 2 

FA SU Committee, SU 315, 4 p.m 
Entertainment Series, "Curlew Ri- 
ver," FA Auditorium, 8 p.m. 



Letter t The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

If you would ask around, you 
would find that many Americans 
today disapprove of civil disobed- 
ience and violence. Before we 
completely condemn those who 
engage in civil disobedience, we 
should look to the past and see 
what has been accomplished. 

1 ) The fathers of the American 
Revolution were disobedient to 
England and fought a war to gain 
what they felt were their rights. 
2, One of the noticeable charac- 
teristics of the labor movement 
in the early part of this century 
was violence. 3) The end of 
"National" prohibition came as 
a result that people refused to 
obey a law which told them what 
they could or could not drink. 
4) Some people have engaged in 
civil disobedience because they 
did not feel that they had rights 
as other Americans do. 

This sketch indicates that civil 
disobedience and sometimes vio- 
lence have been a part of our 
American heritage. Our history 
indicates that when Americans 
have felt unjustly treated, they, 
did something about it. If Ameri- 
cans were not successful in get- 
ting the law changed through nor- 
mal channels, they broke the law 
and sometimes resorted to vio- 
lence. 

Our American Constitution was 
written by men who broke the 
law and fought a war of "Vio- 



SGA 
Minutes 

October 23, 1967 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Absent were Brown, 
an active part in the Pep Rally and is 
were Maxwell. Ferrera, and Riehl. 

President Newbury inaugurated the 
freshman officers and introduced them 
to the SGA. 

A report on the Songfest was given 
by Ellyn McPherson. The committee 
set Wednesday, Oct. 25, as the closing 
date for entering competition. 

Burns reported that the AMS took 
Fowler, M. Gean, Wicks, nad Kirk. Late 
planning dormitory projects for Home- 
coming day. 

Committee meetings were announced 
by Rispoli, Burns, and Fowler. 

Pres. Newbury commended Gaylon 
Landry on his outstanding job on Tech 
Weekend. 

Burns introduced the applicants for 
freshman associates to the SGA and 
explained to them their duties if elect- 
ed. 

Pres. Newbury announced that the 
Travel Board has been referred to the 
Student Services Comm. MaxweU asked 
that the Student Services Comm. also 
consider a library fund project and 
the Discount I.D. Card. 

Maxwell moved that the East stands 
at the stadium be reserved for students 
for the Homecoming game. Ferrera 
seconded. Gray called for question. 
Motion carried. 

Gray moved that the meeting be ad- 
journed. Kirk seconded. Motion carried. 
Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 



lence". Violence is usually the 
last resort of a person who feels 
that he is being treated unjustly. 
If the American colonies had 
had adequate representation in 
parliament, they would not have 
resorted to disobedience. If in- 
dustry had treated laborers with 
dignity, there would have been 
no labor movement and no vio- 
lence. If some minorities had 
been given what they felt was 
just, there would be no need for 
civil disobedience. 

It therefore seems that disobe- 
dience and violence might have 
been prevented in the past by 
those who had the power to help 
those who felt they were being 
treated unjustly. 

Disobedience and violence can 
be prevented in the same way to- 
day. Those today however, who 
hold the power of control, are 
those who control the market 
place. There are some places of 
business who are making profits 
up to three and four hundred 
percent profit. To me this is 
taking unfair advantage of the 
individuals who in many cases 
must buy the product. 

I suggest to those people who 
charge $.3n for a bar of soap and 
$1.00 for a small piece of plastic 
do something about it. Charge 
fair prices before there is the 
"Unbloody" revolution of money. 
If you do not reform you will 
be sorry. One day you will an- 
swer to the American people who 
will, as in the past, refuse to 
obey your law of the almighty 
dollar and not buy your product. 
Sincerely, 
Joseph Baldwin 

T^Surrenl Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weeklv in the 
summer by the Student Bodv of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cnption $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member 
Press 



of the Associated Collegia** 



Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

D r 11 ces . Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

A ' s ? v01 * ,-. Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Importers: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann, Susie Chancey, Danny Bout- 
well, Gail Dooley. Ray King, Gidget 
Maxwell. Jack Montgomery, Shirley 
Ru Hedge. Alton Sanders, Ray Stephens, 
fcd Thompson, Thomas Turner and Vir- 
ginia Ann Wooten. 



Editonlas reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
coUege. 



Friday, October 27, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



European Men? 



Page 3 



Noting The Decline Of American Masculinity 



By Elizabeth 

Women of America, we must 
unite! We are faced with a un- 
ique problem. Our success at 
emancipating ourselves from dis- 
crimination and inequality has 
produced an adverse effect on 
the men of this country. They are 
becoming fat, lazy, and com- 
pletely apathetic toward the 
threat of a matriarchal society. 

In grandma's day. Papa ruled 
with an iron hand. His authority 
was respected and obeyed by 
both his wife and his children. 
Conversely, the 20th century 
household has a system of labor 
and management. The husband 
is the laborer and You Know 
Who is the management! 

The courageous young men 
who fought so bravely in the 
American Revolution have evol- 
ved into a bunch of spineless 
cowards who burn draft cards or 
become professional students in 
an effort to escape the duty of 
defending a free world. 



Ann Sedgwick 

The gallant gentlemen who 
were known to risk their lives in 
defense of a lady have been suc- 
ceeded by a group of ill-man- 
nered creatures who consider 
themselves knights of chivalry 
if they bother to open the car 
door for a girl. 

Another trait of American men 
is stinginess. They feel that they 
have executed a great act of gen- 
erosity by spending $2 on you 
at the movies, while failing to 
consider that you blew $20 on a 
hairdo and new dress; which, by 
the way, no one will even see 
since after the movie your cheap- 
skate directs the car to his fav- 
orite sinister spot to collect re- 
compense under the guise of af- 
fection. 

Liberation of female rights has 
occuredt i n many countries 
throughout the world, but this 
degradation of manhood seems 
to have resulted only in our own 
country. 



I have been privileged to 
travel abroad and to meet and 
associate with many European 
men. They were of different 
countries and cultures, but they 
all possessed two characteristics 
in common — a very distinct and 
pronounced air of masculinity 
and an undeniable aura of charm. 
These are two qualities no wo- 
man can help but admire. A 
man's masculinity enhances her 
feminity and she radiates in his 
charm. 

The American male is too self- 
centered and conceited to de- 
velop even a semblance of charm. 
His best effort is the time worn 
phrase, 'Duh, that's a pretty 
dress.' An exception is Charlie 
Casanova who assures you that 
your dumpy figure is divine and 
your beady little eyes are like 
jewels but never even bothers 
to notice that you really do have 
a dazzling smile. This, needless 
to say, is not charm. 



With regard to manliness, 
European men excel. Rarely do 
you find one who will even per- 
mit, much less approve his wife's 
working outside the home. While 
in America, it is not uncommon 
for one to hear an American hus- 
band, clad in his apron, bragging 
to his envious friends that his 
spouse is supporting him. In his 
eyes this may be a clever ach- 
ievement, but in his wife's — 
Well . . . .! 

The European man has man- 
aged to keep his woman per- 
fectly content, grant her equal 
rights, yet still maintain his pos- 
ition as head of the family. 

On the other hand, American 
women are being forced into a 
role which they do not want and 
for which they are not qualified. 

It is time American men wake 
up and get back into their pro- 
per perspective before they are 
faced with the shocking realiz- 
ation that it's no longer "a man's 
world." 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Two major companies and one 
governmental agency will be in 
the placement office next week 
to conduct employment inter- 
views 

On Tuesday, Joe Williamson 
from the Bureau of Federal Cred- 
it Unions, will interview senior 
accounting majors. 

Wednesday, a representative 
of the Shell Oil Company will 
conduct interviews with Indust- 
rial Arts, and Industrial Tech- 
nology, and any other major 
specializing in sciences. 

Also on Wednesday, the Cen- 
tral Louisiana Electric Company 
representatives will discuss em- 
ployment possibilities with Busi- 
ness Administration and Home 
Economics majors. 

Appointments for these inter- 
views may be made by calling 
the placement office in the Stud- 
ent Union, phone 357-5621 or 
357-5622. 



€5 



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yOUR MIXER 



• • • 








we aIso Udp 

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As tax-payers, the Investor-Owned Electric Companies help pay for 
many miles of Louisiana's new expressways, farm-to-market roads, 
and highway interchanges. Their combined annual tax bill of 
over $54,000,000 makes significant contributions to tax-supported 
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Let's keep good things going for Louisiana with low-cost electric service from 

the five tax-paying INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

OF LOUISIANA! • Louisiana Power & Light Co. • Gulf States Utilities Co. 
Southwestern Electric Power Co. • Central Louisiana Electric Co. 
New Orleans Public Service Inc. 



rage 4 



iHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 27, 1967 



'Picture Of Progress' Appears As 
Building, Improvements Continue 



Northwestern, already accomo- 
dating a record number of stud- 
ents, is preparing for future en- 
rollment hikes with a massive 
program of physical expansion. 



Already taking shape and ex- building on the campus. Built 



THANK YOU! 

I would like to thank 
everyone who supported 
me in the Freshman elec- 
tions. I have filed for 
Freshman associate, and if 
I'm selected, I promise I'll 
work to the best of my 
ability for our class and 
NSC. 

Sincerely, 
Garland Riddle 



pected to be complete in Jan- 
uary is the huge Arts and Sci- 
euces Classroom Building on the 
west side of the campus. The 
building will provide more than 
200 rooms for offices and classes. 
More than 2,500 students will be 
able to use the $3.2 million build- 
ing at one time. 

The Arts and Sciences build- 
ing is going up next to the $1.5 
was completed last year. Both 
are near the new dormitory- 
dining hall complex which 
stands on the western edge of 
the 916-acre campus., 

Recently renovated was Cald- 
well Hall, the oldest classroom 



There's 
something 

about your 

COLLEGE 

RING 




\ that says 
something 
about YOU 



THE FINEST 
SYMBOL OF YOUR 
EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT 
ORDER YOUR RING NOW 
CREATED BY JOHS ROBERTS 



Four Week Shipment 



in 1906, the building once housed 
the college.s administrative off- 
ices but now serves as a class- 
room and faculty office building. 
The three-story building has 
throughout. 

Northwestern president Dr. 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick has spear- 
healed a drive for new physical 
facilities, and his efforts have 
resulted in more than -5 million 
in future expansion. Most of the 
buildings which will be con- 
structed in the next two years 
are still on the drawing boards. 

Kilpatrick and Dean of the 
College Dr. Charles Thomas are 
especially proud of plans for a 
ation center at the college. Work 
should begin on the structure in 
early 1968. The building will be 
four round structures nuder one 
roof, the only eonof its kind in 
Also in the planning stages 
are a $1.2 million women's 
physical education plant, a $1.7 
million biological sciences build- 
ing and a $1000,000 Agricul- 
tural accessory building. 



Baker's Town & Campus Bookstore 



Annual Literary 
Contest Planned 
By Women's Club 

Lesche Club, Natchitoches 
women's cultural organization 
announces its annual literary 
contest open to all NSC students. 

Awards of $15.00, $10.00, and 
$5.00 are given for the best cre- 
ative writings including poetry, 
prose and drama. Entries must 
be submitted to the Lesche Lit- 
erary Committee by Mjarch; 1, 
1968. Enteries will be judged 
by the committee and winners 
will be announced in April. 

Winners last year were Bill 
Ellzey, Mrs. Lola Ross Grafton, 
and Donald Hewett. Forty-two 
NSC students entered more than 
100 works last year. 

Students wishing further infor- 
mation may contact any of the 
members of the committee. Mem- 
bers on the caimpus are Mrs. 
Corinne Ryland and Dr. Edna 
West. 

College Officials 
Speak To Alumni 

Northwestern's Northeast Loui- 
siana Chapter of the Alumni As- 
sociation met in Monroe Monday 
at the Ouachita Parish School 
Board Office. 

Alumni heard talks from Presi- 
dent Dr. Arnold R. Kilpatrick, 
business manager Ted Wright, 
alumni director Harrel Haile and 
assistant alumni director E. H. 
Gilson. 



WADDLE N GRILL and DRIVE IN 

Eat in your car — or our air conditioned 
dining room 

Breakfast # Lunch # Dinner # Snack 
Quality-Service # Dependability 

— Food Prepared To Go - 
Opened 24 HOURS to SERVE YOU 



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Phone 352-4949 



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Interview (continued. ) 



have been fined $50 for every 
pound over that if I hadn't!" 

The transition from college 
football to the professional ranks 
was a great one for Al Dodd. "In- 
stead of playing for fun and glory, 
you're playing for money and se- 
curity for your family. It just 
tears some guys all to pieces 
when they don't make it. 

"You know, I don't agree with 
Vince Lombardi (coach of the 
Green Bay Packers) about hating 
your opponents. I feel that you 
should respect them, otherwise 
you'll get beaten. I don't believe 
that football is 'controlled vio- 
lence.' " 

Al elaborated on his pay and 
the contract. 

"Well, I've got a two-year con- 
tract with the Bears, which makes 
me happy since I was primaraily 
concerned with security for my 
family." He turned. "Hey, Kathy, 
how come you're not wearing 
your diamond earrings? You 
know, the ones I got out of the 
claw machine!" 

Al continued.'Tn the pro ranks, 
money is doled-out according to 
how much the club needs you. 
Some guys get $100,000, others 
get Green Stamps — I get the 
Green Stamps." 

We changed the subject by in- 
quiring about how the Dodds 
liked Chicago, and they retorted, 
"The atmosphere here is not near- 
ly as friendly as it is back home, 
and the cost of living is higher. 
We're coming back to Natchit 
oches in the spring, so that Al 
can complete the work for his 
degree. We miss NSC so much — 
just can't wait to get back." 

Back to football again — what 
about Gale Sayers? 

"Gale is a very quiet person, 
but he is nevertheless friendly. 
He'll help anybody as much as he 
can, especially new people. It's 
a great pleasure to be one of his 
teammates. He's a fabulous foot- 
ball player, and he hasn't realized 
his great potential yet. 

A Winning Streak 

"You know, I enjoy football. 
It's not like having to drag-out of 
bed and drudge to work all day. 



As a matter of fact, I love it. I 
only work four hours a day!" 

"Wait a minute," Kathy inter- 
rupted. "I get you out in the 
mornings at 8 o'clock, and you 
don't come back until 6 p.m. What 
have you been doing all day?" 
"Well. . .you see. . .uhh. . ." 
"Go ahead, dig yourself in 
deeper," Kathy laughed. 

We changed the subject again. 
How about the newest member of 
the Dodd family? 

"Oh, you mean Tracy Lynn," 
Kathy beamed. "Well, she's just 
fine. She's six weeks old and was 
born on September 9 at West 
Jefferson General Hospital in 
New Orleans. That's the same 
day that Al was on his first vic- 
torious professional football 
team!" 

"Right," quipped Al. "I guess 
you could say she came in on a 
winning streak!" 

"And don't think I missed the 
game," Kathy added. "I had a TV 
set right there in the maternity 
room! 

"Which reminds me — we only 
have until 10 p.m. with the sitter, 
so we'd better leave if we're go- 
ing to take the kids to Oldtown." 

"Hope they don't mind my '47 
Plymouth," chirped Al. 

As we waited for the car to 
come down (his same 1963 
Chevy), he offered one more 
story for us. 

"One night I went down the 
street form here to the restaurant 
owned by Johnny Ladner, the 
Notre Dame football player who 
won the Heisman Trophy in 1953. 
I was walking downstairs to the 
dining room, and guess what was 
the first thing I saw, right there 
in a case at the bottom of the 
stairs. It was this big, huge, 
beautiful Heisman Trophy. I just 
stood there — couldn't even move. 

" 'Want to sit down or eat, mis- 
ter?' " the waitress asked me. 

"No ma'am. I'm just window- 
shopping." 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



Friday, October 27, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



At Open House Tomorrow 

Greeks To Greet 
Greek Grads. . . 



By Francis Toler 

Homecoming has a special 
significance for Greeks be- 
cause this is the time when 
alumni return to camnus to 
renew old friendships. Sor- 
ority and fraternity houses 
will be open during the day 
so that old grads can return 
for a visit to their old storriD- 
ing grounds, or whatever you 
call it. 

Besides planning open houses, 
fraternities and sororities have 
been hard at work on displays, 
which will be judged and award- 
ed prizes. 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

Carrie McClelland has been 
elected president of the fall 
pledge class of Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha. Completing the slate of of- 
ficers are Linda Myers, vice-presi- 
dent; Hazel Brooks, secretary; 
and Benny Rikard, treasurer. 

Leaving the land of pledgedom 
for those green pastures of active- 
hood is Marlene Achord, who was 
recently initiated. 

DELTA ZETA 

Heading the fall pledge class of 
Delta Zeta is Karen Allen of Op- 
elousas. Serving with Miss Allen 
are Peggy Carriere, vice-presi- 
dent; Sara Van Arsdel, secretary; 
Pat Green, treasurer; Patsie Slif- 
er and Carol Cook, song leaders; 
and Judy Wilson, parliamenta- 
rian. 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Sigma Kappa's fall pledge class 
recently elected officers. Named 
as president was Marcy LaFleur. 
She will be asisted by Donna Mc- 
Elhatten, vice-president; Nancy 
Hampton, secretary; Jane Mon- 
crief, treasurer; Nina Viger, 
scholarship chairman; and Cookie 
Riggs, gerontology chairman. 

Plans are also beign completed 
for the annual Homecoming slum- 

Philosophy Group 
Plans Discussions 
In Student Union 

"Religious Rejlatidns and 
Morals" was the topic under dis- 
cussion at the third meeting of 
the Philosophy Club held last 
Thursday night in the Student 
Union building. 

Every other week, the club 
meets to discuss topics of general 
appeal concerning philosophy. 
The first discussion conducted 
this semester explained "Religi- 
ous Experience." 

At the club's next meeting 
Tuesday night, members will dis- 
cuss "Progress Philosophy." 

Officers of the club have not 
been selected yet, but will be 
designated at a later time. 

The Philosophy Club is open 
to anyone wishing to attend the 
meetings and discuss the topics 
Presented. At present the mem- 
bership is at approximately 20 
persons. Anyone interested in 
joining the organization should 
contact David R. Crawford, mod- 
erator of the club. 



ber party when the pledges learn 
the identities of their big sisters. 

KAPPA SIGMA 

Tom Roy has been elected presi- 
dent of the Kappa Sig's fall 
pledge class. Other officers in- 
clude Tom Fitzgibbons, vice-presi- 
dent; Kent Hollingshead, traes- 
urer; and Donnie Beauwaise, sec- 
retary. 

In other activities, the fratern- 
ity has sponsored dances after 
all the football games. Plans are 
also being made for a party after 
the Homecoming game and a trip 
to the USL game. 

Besides dances, the Sig's have 
advanced to the semi-finals of 
intramural football without being 
scored on in nine games. 

PI KAPPA PHI 

Seven men have joined the 
pledge ranks of Pi Kappa Phi, 
bringing the total fall class mem- 
bership to 33. They are Roberto 
Fiallos, Ronnie Spiller, Sylvanus 
Thaddeus HowellJII, Oliver My- 
ers, Herndon Tycer, Joe Bay- 
nard and Leland White. 

Lynn Dodd now heads the 
pledge class as president, re- 
placing Reggie Harvey, who was 
seriously injured in a recent 
motorcycle accident. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Sigma Tau Gamma has initiat- 
ed four men into the active chap- 
ter. They are George Gray, Bob 
Murphy, Bob Sheldon, Jack Ben- 
nett and Jim Freeman. 

The new members joined their 
brothers in celebrating the De- 
mon's victory with a dance at the 
Progressive Men's Club in Shreve- 
port. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

Kappa Alpha has added four 
new pledges. Pledged at cere- 
monies Monday night were 
Tony Papa, Stan Lavland, Mike 
Restovich and Jimmy Yates. 

The new pledges joined the 
fraternity at two parties sched- 
uled during the weekend. Friday 
night, the two chapters from NSC 
and Tech held a dance fea- 
turing the "Blue Shadows." 
Completing the weekend was 
a dance on Saturday night with 
the "Alley's End." 

USAF Recruiter 
Plans Interviews 

Captain Frank M. Benton, U.S. 
Air Force Officer Selection spe- 
cialist, will visit the campus 
Thursday to interview senior 
men and women interested in 
an Air Force Commission. 

Commissions will be through 
the officer training school at 
Lackland Air Force Base in San 
Antonio, Tex. 

A display arrangement for his 
visit will be provided in the Stu- 
ent Union between 10 a.m. and 
2 p.m. Thursday All interested 
persons are urged to contact 
Capt. Benton personally. 



Billid 

House of Beauty 

Ask one of our 5 operators how to register for the falls 
and wiglets to be given FREE on Christmas week. 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 



Eyes Right! 

With Bill Burris 




IN APPRECIATION 

In a recent ROTC ceremony on 
campus Lt. Col. Charles Avery 
presented President Arnold Kil- 
patrick an "appreciation certif- 
icate" in behalf of the Comman- 
ding General of the Fourth Ar- 
my, Ft. Sam Houston, Tex. 

The certificate was given as an 
expression of gratitude to the 
college for allowing its employ- 
ees to remain active in the reser- 
ves and to perform other military 
obligations without endangering 
job status. Dean of Men Leonard 
O. Nichols is a prime example of 
Northwestern's encouragement 
of its personnel to further their 
military careers. Dean Nichols is 
a major in the U. S. Army Res- 
erves, and annually attends sum- 
mer camps and other meetings 

Campus ROTC joins with the 
Fourth Army Commanding Gen- 
eral in expressing our grate- 
fulness to President Kilpatrick 
for his continuning support. 

HALLOWEEN AMUSEMENTS 

ROTC will hold it,s first Hall- 
oween Party Oct. 27 at 8 p.m. in 
the Armory. A six-piece band 
will provide music and enter- 
tainment. 

All the normal Halloween 
amusements will be provided, 

Neptune Club Sets 
Water Show Dates 

Susan Day, sophomore from 
Baton Rouge, has been chosen to 
act as director of the Neptune 
Club's Christmas water festival. 
This year's water fete will be 
choreographed by students mem- 
bers alone for first time. The 
25 aquatic enthusiasts who make 
up the club will also form the 
cast of the show. 

Performances will be given 
November 7 and 8 in the Natator- 
ium This year's show will be en- 
titled "The Realm of Christmas 
Spirit." 

Euthenics Meeting 

The Euthenics Club, an organi- 
zation for home-ec majors, will 
hold a reception for the fresh- 
man members tonight in the liv- 
ing room of the Home Economics 
Building. 

The formal affair is held an- 
nually to introduce new members 
to the faculty and other members 
of the club. 



plus some not-so-usual ones. 
Maybe the Great Pumpkin will 
smile on the Demon Cadets! 



Demons 
Number 5 
In the Nation 

(A.P.) 



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Job application pictures Portraits 
Restoration of old photographs Weddings 
Picture frames Greek parties 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 27, 1967 




PAUL ALONZO 
afternoon when 
Alonzo has been 
defensive wall. 



will see plenty of action at defensive tackle tomorrow 
the Demons meet Troy State at Demon Stadium, 
a defensive standout all season anchoring the Demon 



Playoffs Dominate Intramural Scene; 
Volleyball Begins Thursday Night 

Touch football playoffs domin- 
ate the Intramural sports scene 
this week with six teams involv- 
ed in a three league race. 

Representing League A is Sig- 
ma Tau and Kappa Sigma, Lea- 
gue B representatives are the 
Other 9 and the Wonderful Wi- 
nos, while the leaders in League 

Stadium Seats Add 
Spectator Comfort 



College alumni can watch the 
1967 Homecoming Football game 
in greater comfort than ever 
before. 

Glenn Gossett, Demo*i Head 
coadh and Assistant AKhletic 
Director, said that all of the new 
theater-type sleats for Demon 
Stadium will be installed in time 
for Saturday's Homecoming con- 
test with Troy State College of 
Alabama. 

Work began on the multi- 
colored seats several weeks ago. 

In addition, 1,000 more bleach- 
er-type seats have been added, 
giving Demon Stadium a seating 
capacity of 10,500 for the Home- 
coming game. 

After Saturday's Homecoming, 
the Demons have one more home 
game this season, Nov. 4, against 
Gulf States Conference foe 
McNeese. 



STAMP IT! 



C are the Uncouths and the Pas 
Bas Taus from Opelousas. 

The winners of the football 
championships will be determin- 
ed form competition in each lea- 
gue, in single elimination brack- 
ets. 

Volleyball is next in the Intra- 
mural agenda with the entry 
deadline set for Tuesday. Play 
will begin on Thursday at 6 p.m. 
in the Men's Gym. 

Intramural basketball action 
will get underway on Nov. 6, and 
Roy Gentry, director of Intramur- 
als urges everyone to enter their 
team name and roster in the In- 
tramural office as soon as pos- 
sible. 

Results of the football playoffs 
and final standings will be pub- 
lished in next weeks edition of 
the Current Sauce. 

Weightlifting Club Meets 

The Weightlifing Club will 
hold its second meeting of the 
semester Tuesday night at 7:00 
in the Men's Gym. 

The meeting originally sched- 
uled for Monday will cover plans 
on what type of work the club 
will do this year. 



Demons Edge By Tech 



In Annual Fair Game 



with a Free 
Hour Of Beauty 



A consistent band of De- 
mon footballers made a 
second - quarter touchdown 
stick, and came from the 
1967 State Fair Classic with 
a 7-0 win over a tough gang 
of Louisiana Bulldogs. 

Head Coach Glenn Gossett's 
charges held a commanding 
lead in the statistics, but had to 
be content with Don Mayfield's 
one-yard plunge, and Deacon 
Lewis's PAT in the scoring de- 
partment. 

The sometimes awesome De- 
mon ground corps continued to 
excell, as they rolled-up 358 
yards rushing, in comparison 
with Tech's meager 31 yards net 
rush. The Canines did have 
a big lead in the passing depart- 
ment, racking-up 131 yards to 
our 30. However, the Demons 
had a whopping total of 25 first 
downs, while Tech could only 
muster 11. 

The key to the rushing attack 
the Demons mounted was an un- 
usually quick and aggressive 
offensive line. They fired-out 
with blinding speed and an abun- 
dance of strength, and generally 
made life miserable for Dog 
defenders. Of course, the usual 
troupe of Demon running-backs 
battered away at Tech stragglers, 
and had an extremely produc- 
tive evening. 

In driving the Demons to win 
number five this season, our 
"ace" was again quarterback Don 
Guidry, who gained 92 yards in 
17 attempts. But the other De- 
mon backs were not outdone, as 
the "big three" also came 
through with fine performances. 
Kenny Callens collected 87 yards, 
Barry Fresh got 56 for the night, 
and Vic Nyvall contributed 52 
more. 

As usual, Gerald Malley, Paul 
Alonzo, David Lovich, Lester La- 
tino and Ronnie Whatley led the 
defensive charge which shut-out 
the Canines. Their finest mom- 
ment came in the fourth period, 
when they fell en masse onto 
Tech quarterback Phil Robertson 
for a seven-yard loss, as Robert- 
son tried to get off his despera- 
tion fourth-down pass from the 
Purple and White six. 

Terry Bradshaw, the sopho- 
more whiz, completed 11 of 17 
passes for 110 yards, and had dri- 
ven the Bulldogs within scoring 
position. They almost pulled out 
a TD on second and goal from the 
13, as he broke a number of tac- 
kles to loft a shot toward end 
Tommy Spinks, who made a fine 
grab, but couldn't shake loose 
from the last Demon defender. 
Bradshaw got crunched on thet 
next play, and Robertson got it 
on fourth. 

About 25,000 avid spectators 
watched as the elusive Guidry led 
the lone scoring drive which orig- 
inated on the Demon 33 yard-line. 
The Demons reeled-off four str- 
aight first downs, with Guidry 
and Callens weaving in and out 
among the Tech defenders. For 
a time, a 15-yard holding penalty 
seemed to be insurmountable, 
but Guidry danced off on a 26- 
yard run, which kept the deci- 



sive drive alive. Callens raced 
to the one, from where Mayfield 
smashed through the stacked de- 
fense to score. The PAT was true 
with 14:21 to play in the second 
quarter, and the Demons settled- 
back for a long evening of defen- 
sive football. 

The win was the 15th straight 
for the nationally fifth-ranked 
Demons, and was also only the 
15th victory ever over rival Tech 
since 1907. It also marked the 
first time in 27 years that we 
have managed to take back-to 
back conquests from the Canines. 

The Demons are now 5-0 on the 
season to hold onto the top spot 
in the all-game side of the ledger, 
but are tied with the Ragin Ca- 
juns of USL in conference play, 
as each posses identical 2-0 slates 
in Gulf States Conference action. 




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Laundry Service 
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Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

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Broadmoor Shopping Center 
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Delta 

Delta 



Kappa Gamma 



Kappa Gamma, a pro- 
fessional teachers fraternity, con- 
ducted its annual Fall Banquet 
and Initiation in the Student Un- 
ion Building last night. 

The formal affair was held in 
rooms 269 and 270 from 7 to 10 
p.m. Delta Kappa Gamma is one 
of three national fraternities for 
professional teachers. 



We'll give you back a new you! 
You'll learn beauty secrets of 
generations of lovely women. 
Wondering why we do it? Be- 
cause we've found once you've 
seen yourself in Merle Norman 
Cosmetics (real Princess stuff at 
Cinderella prices) you're pretty 
apt to be sold on them from that 
day on. Which is what we want — 
for beauty is our business. 

MERLE NORMAN 
Cosmetic Studio and 
Beauty Salon 
104 South Williams Ave. 

Next to Fleur De Lis Apts. 
Phone 352-3816 

Margurite Johniken, owner 



New From Revlon 

6 Brush on Shadow shades in one colossal compact 
with brush and mirror: EYE SHADOW SPREE $3.50 

From Max Factors 

THE GLOSS OVERS, nail polish reg. $2.25 

now $7.50 

Arrived: New shipment of JADE EAST and 
ENGLISH LEATHER 

DeBLIEUX'S PHARMACY NEW DRUG STORE 
Broadmoor Shopping Center Second & St. Denis 
Phone 352-4582 Phone 352-2386 



Welcome Alumni 

while in town 
Shop 

SANDEFUR JEWELERS 

The Jewelers with 
the Demon touch 



117 St. Denis 



Phone 352-6390 



Friday, October 27, 1967 THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



From. Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 

RUN RUN— BUT NOT PAST THE 20 

The victory-studded Demons came through once again 
last Saturday night in the annual State Fair Classic, by 
staving-off a wild La. Tech aerial assault in the waning mo- 
ments of an on-again, off-again kind of football game. The 
Demons came out with a rather indecisive 7-0 victory over 
the ancient arch-rivals, in a contest that had advance billing 
of a small college "super-bowl." 

Instead, it became a boringly typical affair as our grid- 
iron gladiators tried to stall-away the victory, while Tech's 
Terry Bradshaw pulled all kinds of marvelous tricks to get 
six point. Deep down you knew — you just knew — that he 
wouldn't; but you also knew that if he had, the two more 
extra points to win the game were likely to follow. 

Coach Glenn Gossett got his most important win yet as 
head mentor in a game that saw the sometimes ominous De- 
mon ground attack tromp relentlessly up and down the field 
with what appeared to be little or no effort, until they got 
near the opposition's 20-yard line, where they repeatdly with- 
ered out, to settle for one of Deacon Lewis' feeble field goal 
attempts. As a matter of fact, the entire Demon kicking game 
was woefully inadequate. It would seem that we could find 
someone who can kick-off past the enemy's 15-yard line, and 
someone who can punt in a direction other than sideways. 

Demoniacal Defense 

If anything at all can be deduced from the Tech battle, 
it is the increasingly clear importance of the Demon defense. 
Had it not been for their great efforts all night, and partic- 
ularly near the end of the game, it would have proven a disas- 
trous evening. 

Gearld Malley was literally all over the field, and kept 
the pressure on the Bulldog passers, as well as making key 
stops everywhere. Likewise, Paul Alonzo turned in a superla- 
tive effort. Perhaps the stingiest Demon of them all was 
sophomore Lester Latino, who played the role of opportunist 
and fell on two Tech fumbles, as well as delivering his stan- 
dard stellar performance. 

The least likely thing about the game was the score. Not 
many right-thinking predictors would have expected such 
a low final score. As matter of fact, at the rate the Demons 
let loose their rushing attack, and considering the quick air- 
strike ability of the Tech team, one might have expected a 
flood of touchdowns. But some things are not meant to be. 

Enter Troy State 

Tomorrow's opponent is one of those little-known teams 
which has played seven games and won six of them, losing 
the other by the narrowest of margins. With seconds remain- 
ing in the Troy-Arkansas State contest, a Troy fullback 
plowed over the goal line, apparently giving his team a 27-26 
victory. However, in his ecstacy he tossed the ball into the 
air before the whistle was blown, and one of his opponents 
fell on it. Needless to say, this official's decision created 
quite a furor, but Troy lost anyway. 

Horoscopes . . . Oh, No! 

The official FDU medium finished last week with seven 
correct guesses in eight attempts, which made us feel ridicu- 
lous. Nevertheless, the Unknown One thinks that a perfect 
slate is within the realm of reason, so here goes: 
NSC 17, Troy St. 9 
New Mexico St. 13, La. Tech 7 
Northeast 18, USL 7 
Pensacola 27, SLC 10 
Jacksonville 15, La. College 
Tennessee 17, LSU 7 
Georgia Tech 36, Tulane 6 
Pittsburg 15, New Orleans 9 



Demons 
For Troy 

By Bobby Ardoin 

After edging arch rival La. 
Tech in the annual State Fair 
Classic, coach Glenn Gossett and 
his Demon eleven face their most 
monumental task to date when 
they attempt to halt the inva- 
sion from Troy in tomorrow af- 
ternoon's Homecoming contest. 

Although the Demons have faced 
formidable opposition from such 
GSC foes as Northeast and La. 
Tech, the Red Wave from Ala- 
bama presently own the best re- 
cord of any club on the Demon 
schedule, and have beaten the 
majority of their opponents by 
lopsided scores. 

The Demons will enter the con- 
test with an unblemished 5-0 re- 
cord, a national ranking in the 
top ten, and a fifteen game win- 
ning streak dating back to 1965. 

Troy posseses a 6-1 mark this 
season, and has already clinched 
their first Alabama Collegiate 
Conference championship. 

Outscoring the opponents has 
been the Red Wave's biggest as- 
set, tallying 172 points to the 
other teams' 59. 

Troy owns victories over Gor- 
don Military, Samford State, 
Livingston State, Delta State, 
Jacsonville, and Florence State 
Teachers College. 

Arkansas State Teachers Col- 
lege marks the only blemish on 
the Red Wave record, defeating 
Troy in Conway, Ark. 26-21. 

In that contest, the men from 
Troy fumbled eight times, losing 
the ball on five occasions. To 
add to their woes, the Red Wave 
had two touchdowns called back 
on penalties. Troy came out a- 
head in total offensive statistics 
in this one with 485 yards. 

Offense appears to be the big 
word around the Troy football 
camp as one would seem to notice 
by observing their season totals. 

Going into last week's game, 
elusive Troy quarterback Sim 
Byrd was ranked fourth in NAIA 
passing offense. Byrd had com- 
pleted 91 of 133 passes for 1208 
yards and nine touchdowns. 

In the Jacksonville State con- 
test, Byrd completed 35 of 53 
passes for 448 yards and four 
touchdowns. 

Although their passing attack 
seems to dominate the offensive 
statistics, their rushing game 
may become somewhat of a pro- 
blem with halfback Jeff Cotten 
leading the way. 

The 190 pounder has been ham- 
pered during the past few weeks 
with early season injuries, but 
coach Billy Atkins has stated 
that Cotten will be ready to see 
action against the Demons. 

Another headache that will pre- 
sent itself Saturday afternoon 
is whether or not the Demons 
will be able to apply their usual 
(See Troy Contest, page 8) 



Prepare 
Contest 



Science Fair Plans Made 

Plans were made for the State 
Science Fair here this spring at 
a meeting in Pineville last Sat- 
urday of directors and committee 
members of State and Regional 
Science Fairs. 



Rodeo Club Open 
For All Students 

This year, as in the past, 
there is a Rodeo Club on campus 
for all interested students. The 
group informally represents NSC 
in all area rodeos. 

Officers for the year are 
George Fruge, president; Jim 
Briggs, vice-president; Jean Nims, 
secretary-treasurer; Jack Shanz, 
reporter; and Dr. C. E. Stuffle- 
beam, faculty sponsor. 

Rodeo team members who com- 
pete in rodeos throughout the 
frea are Fruge and Jack McCorey 
in bareback riding; Leander Frey, 
Rill Onist, Jim Briggs and John- 
ay Granger, bullriding; Nims, 
Jim Briggs, Tommy Granger, and 
Dickie McBride, calf roping; and 
Harold Nations, steer wrestling. 

In recent competition, Ted Mc- 
Corey of Shreveport took first 
Place in his specialty at the 
Natchitoches fair as did Joe 
Scorggins, a local student. 



College students, now you can have that portrait 
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No extra charge for drapes or full length pictures. 
No sitting charge, ever at UHRBACHS 



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Of course, it is only when it concerns NSC, 
We're behind the DEMONS all the way! 




Sunday School — 9:40 a.m. 

College Choir — 5:00 p.m. 

Training Union — 6:30 p.m. 

Worship Services — 8:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 7:30 p.i 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

508 Second Street 
Dr. James E. Carter, Pastor 



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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, October 27, 1967 



Caddo Leads Parishes 
In College Enrollment 



A breakdown of the college's 
record fall enrollment of some 
6,300 students shows that more 
than 1,051 students are from Cad- 
do parish. 

Caddo, which for several years 
has had the largest number of 
students at Northwestern of all 
the Louisiana parishes, is rep- 
resented by 576 women students 
and 475 men. 

Natchitoches parish has the 
second largest number of stud- 
ents with some 950, but an ad- 
ditional 200 married students 
from throughout the state are 
now listing Natchitoches address- 
es. 

The third largest contributor 

Troy Contest— 

(Continued from page 7) 
ball control tactics to the game 
situations. The invaders from 
Troy possess a mammouth for- 
ward defensive wall, and will 
present problems for the normal, 
conservative running game used 
by the Demons. 

In five games, the Demons have 
accumulated 1,595 yards in the 
ground, and have tallied 14 times 
by rushing. 

Leading the ground corp is Vic- 
tor Nyvall, who has totaled 279 
yards in 40 carries for a 6.9 aver- 
age. He is followed by halfback 
Kenny Callens who has gained 
264 in 45 carries. Callens has a 
5.5 norm. 

In the passing department, the 
Demons mamy have to rely on the 
throwing of strong arms Malcolm 
Lewis and Don Guidry to allow 
them to overcome crucial game 
situations. 

Gudiry and Lewis have com- 
bined their talents to riddle 
enemy air defenses for 437 yards 
and seven touchdowns. 

Guidry has completed 11 of 25 
passes for 203 yards, while Lewis 
has thrown 14 completions in 28 
attempts. 

All in all, tomorrow afternoon 
may prove a very interesting one 
to the football observer. The 
Demon passing attack may have 
to be awakened from its dor- 
mant stage, if the Demons hope 
to win their 16th straight, and 
may have to match wits with the 
Troy defense. 

Another aspect is whether the 
Demon rushing game can find 
holes in the massive Red Wave 
line for sizeable gains and pos- 
sible scores, and penetrate the 
visitor's goal line throughout 
the afternoon. 



of students to the college is Rap- 
ides with 550, including 283 men 
and 267 women. 

Bossier Parish is fourth with 
an enrollment of 283 students, 
giving the Caddo-Bossier area 21 
per cent of the student popula- 
tion. 

Figures reveal that of the col- 
lege's record enrollment, 5,939 of 
the students are from Louisiana, 
thus making up 94 per cent of the 
total college enrollment. 

All 64 parishes are represent- 
ed. In addition, there are 346 
out-of-state students from 41 
states and the District of Colum- 
bia as well as 47 foreign students 
form 18 countries. Texas is the 
leading contributor of out-of-state 
students to the college. 

Other parishes which contri- 
bute largely to the student pop- 
ulation are Vernon, 253; Sabine, 
232; East Baton Rouge, 195; Web- 
ster, 171; De Soto, 137; Beaure- 
gard, 132; Winn, 124; Grant, 122; 
St. Landry, 122 and Avoyelles, 
121. 




• FACULTY BRIEFS 

(Continued from page 2) 



Margaret Adkins, vocal music 
supervisor in Northwestern Ele- 
mentary School, and John Le- 
Blanc, director of choral activi- 
ties at NSC. 



ENTERTAINMENT SERIES— 
Bill Fowler, vice-president of the 
Student Government Association, 
has announced that, in keeping 
with the SGA policy of booking 
big-name entertainement well in 
advance, Ray Charles has been 
lined up for an appearance dur- 
ing Spring semester. The Student 
sponsors the dances which are 
held in the Student Union. Fow- 
ler is head of the Faculty-Stu 
dent Relations Committee, which 
is currently considering work on 
a course evaluation publication. 



Dr. Michael J. Cousins, head of 
the department of special educa- 
tion at Northwestern State Col- 
lege, was a featured speaker dur- 
ing the annual meeting of the 
American Association of Mental 
Deficiency in Wichita, Kan., 
Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Several hundred educators, ad- 
ministrators and professional per- 
sonnel from throughout the na- 
tion attended the sessions, which 
featured a slate of outstanding 
speakers. 

Cousins' topic for the sessions 
was "Associative Effects of Or- 
ganization Membership on Parents 
of Retarded Children." 



Six Seniors Assume Domestic Chores 
At College's Home Economics Cottage 



J. W. Johnson, assistant pro- 
fessor of business administration 
was featured speaker last Satur- 
day morning at the annual meet- 
ing of the Southwest District of 
the Louisiana Business Education 
Association in Opelousas. 

Johnson addressed the more 
than 50 teachers on "Data Pro- 
cessing for Business Teachers." 



Six single girls, all Home Eco 
nomics majors, are now learning 
the reponsibilities of being home- 
makers by assuming the manage- 
ment of the Home Management 
Residence on campus. 

By residing in the house for 
the first nine weeks of the se- 
mester, the coeds will receive 
management in addition to ta- 
king their regular home econo- 
mics courses. 

Now making their home in the 
Home Management house are 

Business School 
Conducts Second 
Seminar Sessions 

The second in a series of stu- 
dent seminars conducted by the 
School of Business was conducted 
last Tuesday in the Student 
Union, beginning at 4:15 p.m. 

Delivering the program this 
month was Dr. David Townsend, 
Dean of the School of Business. 
Townsend spoke on "A Free Mar- 
ket Approach to Banking Re- 
form." 

More than 40 faculty members 
and business administration grad- 
uate students attended the month- 
ly seminar. 



Nona Allen, Genette Wells, Suz- 
anne Charbreck, Paulette Harp, 
Charlotte Jowers and Sherryl 
Short. 

Mrs. Margaret Ackel of the 
home economics faculty is the 
management house supervisor 
and Mrs. Valerie Laing is resi- 
dent director. 

The coeds assume their re- 
sponsibilities of homemakers 
and carry out all phase of home 
management such as operating 
on a budget. 

Each girl also alternates in such 
responsibilities as housekeeper, 
cook, gardener and hostess. Fa- 
mily meals are prepared daily 
as well as special dinner parties 
for special faculty guests. 



Dr. Harriett E. Frederick has 
been appointed associate profes- 
sor of special education at North- 
western State College effective 
Dec. 1, according to President 
Arnold R. Kilpatrick. 

Dr. Frederick received her 
bachelor's degree in education 
from Northwestern, a master's de- 
gree in Latin from the University 
of Illinois, a master's in psycho- 
logy from the University of Louis- 
ville and her doctorate in special 
education from the University of 
Illinois. 

The new Northwestern faculty 
member has 25 years teaching 
experience and was most recently 
school psychologist for the Louis- 
ville School System and lecturer 
at the University of Louisville. 



Baker's Snack Bar 

Phone 352-9245 or 352-4362 1 1 3 2nd Street 

(Next Door To Baker's Town & Campus Bookstore) 



Wishes to express. . . 

THANK YOU 

to all NSC students for their 
patronage by presenting. . . 

from now thru November 
BAKER'S 19c HAMBURGER 



Congratulations 
Rudy Burnette! 

You're the winner of our gift 
certificate at Northwestern. 

Thanks to all the NSC students 
who visited us last Saturday and 
participated in the spirited ses- 
sions prior to game time. 

We know you're looking forward 
to next year when you can again 
wreck Tech. 




Shreveport, La. 



She is licensed as a psycholo- 
gist by the state of Kentucky, is a 
certified teacher of physically 
handicapped, deaf and hard of 
hearing, and has clinical compe- 
tence in audiology from the 
American Speech and Hearing 
Association. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
I Sat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Tonight and 
Saturday 

"Good morning. 
My name is Miss 
.. Barett. I am your 
* Home Room teach- 
er. . ." 

"UP THE DOWN 
STAIRCASE" 

Starring — 

Academy Award 
Winner. . . 

Sandy Dennis 

color 



Sun-Mon-Tues 



Stock Car Racing! 

"TRACK OF 
THUNDER" 
color 



Wednesday 



1 



Dean Martin 

'ROUGH NIGHT 
IN JERICO" 



CHIEF , 

D R I VE,-! N 



Last Times Tonight] 

Tony Curtis 
"DON'T MAKE 
WAVES" 
color 

Saturday 
James Garner 
"DUEL AT 
DIABLO" 
color 

— PLUS — 
Jason Robards 

"A THOUSAND 
CLOWNS" 

Sun and Mon 
Anthony Quinn 
Irene Papas 
"ZORBA 
THE GREEK" 

Tuesday Only 
"THE DEAD ONE" 
color 

— PLUS — 
"CHAMBER OF fl 

HORRORS" 
color 

— PLUS — 
"TWO ON A 

GUILLOTINE" 

Bucknite 
"SPY WHO CAME 
IN FROM COLD" 

— PLUS — 
"HOT RODS 
TO HELL" 



Femininity 



See Page 4 




urrent Sauce 



Vol. LVI— No. 11 



Music 

See Page 5 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



SGA Names Ten 
Frosh Associates 

Wett-Qualified 'Job Crew 
Elected After Questioning 



Friday, November 3, 1967 



All Of Emotion 



The Beauty Of State Fair. . . 



By The Sauce 
Editorial Staff 

What would you like to 
do to change this school? 
What would you say if you 
were told to vacuum the SGA 
Room once a day? 

Questions like these made 
the difference Monday even- 
ing for over 20 well-qualified 
candidates for ten freshman 
associate positions on the 
council of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. 

After qualifications, reviews, 
questioning, and discussion by 
SGA members, those finally cho- 
sen were James Baker, Marsha 
Bella, Melda Durbin, Raymond 
Hammond, Jane Anne McFarland, 
Susan Nickerson, Garland Rid- 
dle, Pat Sellars, Brenda Stanley, 
and Larry Vestal. 

The associates' major respon- 
sibility will be, in the words of 
one of the candidates, "to do the 
dirty jobs that SGA members 
don't want to do themselves." 
The position also maintains sta- 
tus as a kind of student govern- 
ment apprenticeship — a period 
of observation and training for 
later acceptance of office-holding 
responsibilities. 

The review of the candidates 
was outlined by the Elections 
Board. It began with the reading 
of papers turned in by the candi- 
dates, inquiring into qualifica- 
tions for the position and the 
candidates' reasons for applying. 

A HARD CHOICE 

Exceptional records of high 
school activities and honors ap- 
peared in the case of almost 
every candidate. "The choice 
Charles Skinner. "Whether or 
not the right people were chosen 
will not be known until a good 
portion of the work is done." 

Individual questioning of the 
candidates was conducted on sub- 
jects such as campus improve- 
ment, personal ambitions, and 
student attitudes. The warm-up 
question was the one about va- 
cuuming the SGA Room, and 
answers ranged rom "I suppose 
I'd do it if I had to," to "Where's 
the vacuum cleaner?" 

As the floor was opened to the 
entire council for questioning, 
other issues emerged. What do 
the new associates want to 
change on campus? One suggest- 
ed stricter dormitory rules for 
men. Others said that something 
should be done about registra- 
tion, about the traffic problem, 
about food. Somebody felt that 
"everything at NSC is just hunky 
dorie." 

The election itself was held 
ln - the most orderly and busi- 
ness like fashion that has been 
evident in SGA activities in 
years. Members of the council 
seemed to be taking a keen in- 
terest in the choices before them. 

STADIUM SEATING 

In other business, the SGA 
concerned itself with the seating 
situation at home games in De- 
mon Stadium. It was unanimous- 
ly agreed that something should 
be done before next year, and, 
following a series fo heated 
complaints, the matter was re- 
ferred to the School Spirit Com- 
mittee, headed by IFC President 
J oe Germany. 

Skinner brought the council 
a recommendation rom the Blue 
Key organization that a "Howdy 
Ua y" be promoted in the near 



future both to boost school spir- 
it and to enable the enlarging stu- 
dent body to become better ac- 
quainted. 

The matter of the "Howdy Day" 
was referred to the AMS and the 
AWS for discussion, with the 
understanding that action should 
be forthcoming before the Christ- 
mas holidays. 

STUDENT DISCOUNT 

Discount for students at Natch- 
itoches stores and businesses 
may be a reality next semester 
if the proposed Student Discount 

The card would provide dis- 
card is adopted by the SGA. 
counts on various items, ranging 
from gasoline to a new suit of 
clothes, if purchased from mer- 
chants participating in the dis- 
count program. At the present 
time, the Student Services com- 
mittee is investigating discount 
policies of other colleges before 
invoking the proposed discount 
program. 

Consuming a major part of the 
SGA agenda Monday night was 
the presentation of committee 
reports by the respective student 
committee chairmen. Fowler that 
board would try to execute the 
teacher evaulation program a- 
gain this year. 

In reporting on the traffic com- 
mittee, which he heads, Fowler 
stated that the group was inves- 
tigating speeding problems on 
campus as well as ways to cut 
down the number of traffic tic- 
kets being issued. 

Fowler, who also is chairman 
of the Entertainment committee, 
reported that he publication for 
the upcoming Simon and Gar- 
funkle show was underway and 
that he had made considerable 
progress in booking spring enter- 
tainment. 




. . .is revealed in the ex- 
cited {aces of members of 
the Northwestern State 
Fair Court as the tension 
mounts in early moments 
of the historic 1967 Tech 
Game. All of emotion — 
hope, terror, warmth, joy 
— is captured pure and 
free in these four candids 
by college photographer 
Norman Brown. The girls 
are (clockwise from left) 
Linda Craft, Marsha Bella, 
Jane Holland, Martha Min- 
vielle, .Queen Paula 
Wright, and Brenda Wil- 
son. 




Traffic On Sibley Drive To Be Restricted 
Starting Monday Under City Ordinance 



All traffic exiting from 
parking lots on Sibley Drive 
will be required to turn west 
toward College Avenue start- 
ing Monday in compliance 
with an ordinance passed re- 
cently by the Natchitoches 
City Council. 

Westward traffic turning di- 
rectly from College Avenue, how- 
ever, will still be allowed to tra- 
vel on Sibley Drive, according to 
Campus Security Chief James 
Lee. But, states Lee, if the new 
ruling does not prove effective, 
Sibley Drive may be restricted 
completely to one-way traffic. 

The primary purpose of this 
ordinance, says Student Chair- 
man of the Campus Traffic Com- 
mittee Bill Fowler, is to cut down 
on the traffic flow toward the 
Caspari Street and Sam Sibley 
Drive intersection. 

This intersection, long a cam- 
pus traffic bottle-neck, has been 
termed by the traffic committee 
as the focal point of traffic con- 
gestion. 

Months of deliberation went 
into the committee's decision to 
direct all exiting traffic west- 
ward, according to committee 
members. During the decision 
making period, the committee, 
composed of faculty, students 



and staff, met with Natchitoches 
Commissioner of Public Safety, 
Johnny Michael. 

Once the decision had been 
reached by the group, the propos- 
al was presented to the Natchit- 
oches City Council which passed 
the soon-to-be-imposed ordinance. 
The college campus is within the 
city limits of Natchitoches and 
therefore is under jurisdiction of 
the city's law. 

The law will go into effect Mon- 
day, according to Chief Lee, and 
traffic tickets will be issued by 
the Campus Security force to all 
those violating the city and cam- 
pus ordinance. 

EXPANSION PROBLEMS 

With the presence of hundreds 
more students on campus this 
semester, the problems of campus 
driving have become more seri- 
ous. Accordingly, rules and regu- 
lations are becoming more com- 
plicated, Fowler points out. 

This latest action by a combined 
delegation of town and college 
representatives attempts to alle- 
viate the most immediate point 
of difficulty, and more discussion 
and remedial action are scheduled 
to follow. Fowler's campus traffic 
committee will meet again this 
week in the Union. 

(For student's opinion of the 
dilemma of the driver at North- 
western, refer to "Letter to the 



Editor" on page two of this issue.) 

TRAFFIC TICKETS 

Besides tackling the traffic 
congestion question, the commit- 
tee has investigated methods of 
alleviating the present parking 
and traffic problem. 

At the present time, states 
Chief Lee, some 1500 to 1800 



tickets have been issued to stu- 
dent drivers by the Campus Se- 
curity. 

According to Chairman Fow- 
ler, all students receiving seven 
traffic or parking tickets will be 
brought before the student-fac- 
ulty traffic committee which 
meets every other Tuesday. 



Sorority Cops Campus Prize 
For Homecoming Decorations 



Delta Zeta sorority copped first 
place in the Homecoming Cam- 
pus Decorations Contest last 
week and walked off wih $100 
in prize money for their efforts. 

Also placing in the campus- 
wide contest were the Blue Key 
and Purple Jackets, who cap- 
tured second, and Sigma Sigma 
Sigma, which landed in third 
place. Kappa Alpha and Phi Mu 
received honorable mention in 
the all-campus division. 

In the residence hall division, 
the men outclassed the women 
by taking both first and second 
places. Natchitoches Hall took 
first place money amounting to 
$50, and Prudhomme Hall was 
the second place winner. 

Delta Zeta added more frosting 
to the cake by winning first place 



adding another $50 to their kitty. 
Kappa Alpha and Phi Mu placed 
second in their division, while 
Sigma Sigma Sigma captured 
third. 

Wesley Foundation won $50 
for their first place effort, and 
the Baptist Student Union took 
second, to round out the religious 
centers division. 

In other groups on campus, the 
Blu« Key and Purple Jackets 
won $50 for first place, while the 
AWS and AMS finished second. 
Third place was awarded to the 
Davis Players. 

Displays w<ere judged by a 
facujtty-student committee con- 
sisting of Wayne Branton, Jan 
Warren, Dr. Edna West, Mrs. 
Irma Taylor, and Orville 
Hanchey. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 3, 1967 



Halft 



| Rout The Boos, 
I © Rouse A Cheer! 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 



What we need at Northwestern is an air pollution expert 
to examine the atmosphere. Something has caused an epi- 
demic of shortened memories. 

Three years is not a long time, but apparently, there are 
people on and around this campus whose memories of the 
fall of 1965 have failed them completely. 

We have not forgotten. We can remember cringing when 
Northwestern' s Marching Band walked onto the field. There 
they were — 40 of them. We wondered how 40 people could 
have so many things working against them. Their decade-old 
uniforms were faded and baggy. Their instruments were bat* 
tered and tarnished. You could hear them only when the 
wind was blowing in the right direction, and then they 
sounded weak because of the lack of numbers. 

It was embarrasing, and a lot of people said so. We are 
not criticizing anybody for the 1965 band. It's history. And 
we know that the people in that band had pride and even 
talent, but they had very little else that goes into making a 
fine band — like money, instruments, uniforms, and additional 
people. 

This year and last, Northwestern has fielded a 115- 
member band, resplendent in flashing new uniforms, carry- 
ing shiny new instruments and marching in step. 

President Arnold R. Kilpatrick, a Northwestern alumnus, 
was probably embarrassed by the kind of band this school 
had in 1965. Last year, he devoted time, money and support 
to the organization, and the results have been evident. Bob 
Smith, director of bands, has devoted the past two years of 
his life to giving this college a band it can be proud of. 

Last Saturday, Troy State of Alabama brought a mag- 
nificent band to Demon Stadium. They deserved the cheers 
and standing ovation given them by Northwestern supporters. 
But Northwestern's band did not deserve the criticism and 
unkind comments heaped upon them when they performed 
behind the Troy musicians. 

It is fantastic that our memories have become so short- 
ened and our foresight so shielded. What manner of people 
smirk at improvement rather than applaud it? 

We have a young band— 70 percent of the members are 
freshmen and sophomores — and we have a dedicated band. 
Most of the members are not even music majors. 

While the critics are lounging in front of television sets 
and looking for other things to criticize, the Northwestern 
Band will be continuously working toward even greater im- 
provement. And, certainly, the band will become better each 
year. 

We at Northwestern should no longer be embarrassed 
by our band — we should instead be embarrassed by its critics. 



Sports 



A Critic Defends 
His Team Spirit 



(Editor's Note: This editorial was written by Sauce Co-Sports Editor 
Bobby Ardoin, a sophomore Journalism major from Opelousas. Ar- 
doin's editorial also reflects the personal opinion of the editor.) 

Recently a handful of Demon football players and stu- 
dents have become disenchanted with comments and personal 
views expressed in our articles, and in particular with the re- 
marks made in the column "From Down Under," written by 
co-sports editor Jay Keppel. 

Unfortunately, these misinformed individuals seem to 
think that we hold personal grudges against the team and 
some of its members, and that our views are irrational and in- 
sensible. 

Before the players and their student supporters use rash 
judgement and find us guilty, they must realize that our com- 
ments are not intended to belittle the team in any way, but 
rather to offer our own criticisms and suggestions on how the 
team can be improved, and point out a number of minor weak 
spots that have obviously plagued the team and should be 
corrected. 

Both Keppel and I have been associated with football 
teams during our high school years, and are well aware of the 
effort, perserverance, and sheer fortitude that is required to 
survive daily workouts. 

We sympathize with the players and understand that 
they have built up a strong sense of pride in their ballclub. 

We would like to clarify our position and note that the 
main purpose of our articles is to offer comments that should 
be publicized in order to let the Demons know how we feel 
about them, and offer suggestions on how they should be cor- 
rected. After all, what good would a campus newspaper be if 
it did not express itself as is saw fit? We do not print just 
anything in order to be sensational, or to create turmoil. Our 
writings are not patterned to make things look immaculate, 
or make the gridiron scene appear as if it were always going 
along smoothly. 

If that were the case, we may as well turn over pages 
six and seven to the players themselves, and let them print 
what they want to hear and enjoy seeing. 

Jay and I personally believe that the Demons possess 
one of the finest squads in the country and the Current Sauce 
joins the rest of the student body in offering their best school 
spirit and team support. 




''•He's th£ oi4ly pvtMuiemfixoz. we've ewR had whc 

HAi6 FULLY U^PERSTCOP OUR B^RKlM^ PROBLEM." 



Letter t The Editor 



To the Editor, 

Everybody talks about it, but 
nobody does anything about it! 
I'm talking about the traffic pro 
blem of course. I am yet another 
person who desires to "talk" 
about it. 

I must commend our campus 
security and administration, how- 
ever. They are doing a magni- 
ficent job. To prove my point, 
let me give a few examples. 

With the critical parking pro- 
blem on this campus, some peo- 
ple were taking advantage of the 
parking places on front of the 
Student Union. In a brillant move, 
the drive was closed to all traf- 
fic. I know this may seem like 
amputating a finger to cure a 
hangnail, but let's be fair about 
it. Rumor has it that the wife of 
one of our administrators was 
unable to park in the no parking 
zone under the crosswalk when 
it was raining. However, I'm sure 
there could be no connection be- 
tween this and the drive being 
closed. 

By all means let us not forget 
that wonderful little sign at one 
of our major intersections. To 
a stranger on our campus, it 
would seem that the only way to 
get on Sibley Drive is to be born 
there. This is ridiculous though, 
because all the students know 
that you can simply go through 
the parking lot down the street. 

Although I commend all these 
wonderful efforts, I do have one 
question. Why can't some of the 
thousands of dollars collected on 



traffic tickets be used to improve 
present parking problems? But 
we must take into consideration 
the glee which every campus 
security officer must feel when 
it rains. After all, with the dirt 
lot in front of Rapides Hall 
turned into an impassable quag- 
mire, he has a lot better chance 
of writing tickets when some 
student doesn't want to risk 
losing his car forever in the mud. 

Thank you, 
Mike Corbell 



Ecumenical Order 

New Mass Sets 
Spirit Of Unity 
For Catholics 

In accordance with the deci- 
sion of the Vatican Council of 
1964, the Roman Catholic Mass 
is now completely in the vernac- 
ular as the new English trans- 
lation of the Canon came into 
common use across the country. 

The translation of the Canon 
marked an end to the 1400 year 
old Latin Rite as it was former- 
ly performed. The new Canon 
has been modified and simpli- 
fied slightly to stimulate a bet- 
ter understanding by the congre- 
gation of what this rite means. 

According to Father James 
Fahey, pastor of Holy Cross Ca- 
tholic Church, "At present, the 
Senate of Bishops in Rome are 
working on the proposal of four 
other possible forms of the 
Canon:" 

They include (1) A briefer 
Canon based on St. Hippolytus' 
Canon. (CA. 200 A.D.) (2) Ful- 
ler version used at any mass. (3) 
A Canon which praises God and 
His creations. (4) A Canon that 
would introduce Eastern tradi- 
tion. This version would be taken 
from St. Basil. 

This latest change was the re- 
sult of a committee appointed 
by Pope Paul at the last Vatican 
Council. This council, called 
"Councilium," is the body re- 
sponsible for the present trans- 
lation of the English Canon. The 
council is carrying out the 
changes decided upon at the 
council held in 1964. 

The new all-English mass with 
its modifications is to help the 
congregation more closely relate 
the different parts of the mass. 
This clarfication is helping Ca- 
tholics across the nation get a 
deeper appreciation and under- 
standing of what the mass is 
about. 



Minutes of SGA 



October 30, 1967 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Minutes were read 
and approved. Roll called. Absent were 
Landry, Brown, and Jean. Late was 
Lowe. 

Toni Rispoli reported that Wayne 
Branton has written to companies and 
various college concerning the discount 
I.D. card. An answer has not yet been 
received. Rispoli said trat the old travel 
board has been disposed of and would 
require a new one. There were two 
estimates made — $10 from the Carpen- 
ter shop of the board and outline only. 
This would require an artist to com- 
plete the board with additional cost; 
and $30 from the Oliver Carpenter shop 
in Natchitoches who would complete 
the entire board for this fee. Several 
suggestions were made as to what ex- 
actly should be on the board. Maxwell 
moved we accept the suggestion of the 
immediate area of the Arkansas, Miss- 
issippi, Texas, and Louisiana states; 
plus a small replica of the U.S. devided 
into four areas. Also, that the Oliver 
Carpenter shop get the contract to do 
the work. Seconded by Burns. Cooper 
called for question. Motion carried. 

Bill Fowler reported that the Traffic 
Committee has met with both faculty 
and students. The result of the meet- 
ings was that when a student receives 



Weevi 



A Short History 
Of Food Reform 



a total number of seven tickets he will 
be brought before the student faculty 
committee. There will be a committee 
meeting every other Tuesday. The com- 
mittee is also trying to cut down on 
speed problems on the campus. 

Fowler also reported that the stu- 
dent-faculty relations committee will be 
trying to execute the teacher evalua- 
tion program this year. Other plans are 
also in progress. 

The publication for the coming Simon 
and Garfunkel show is weU underway 
according to Fowler. Also, much pro- 
gress has been made on booking the 
spring entertainment. 

Burns said the AMS will be having 
several meetings during the week. He 
commented on the good work done on 
the AMS projects for homecoming. 

Burns talked to the members of the 
SGA on the importance of the office of 
Freshman Associate. He handed out 
duplicated sheets with each nominees 
name and a place for comments. The 
students were then interviewed indivi- 
dually by the SGA. Each nominee was 
subject to questions from the entire 
membership. The SGA members then 
voted and turned their baUot into 
Henry Burns, chairman of the Elec- 
tions Board. 

Committee meetings for the coming 
week were announced. 

President Newbury brought to the 
attention of the SGA members that 

(Cont. on Page 4) 



Cu rrent Sauce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Two weeks ago there were weevils in the noodles. It 
happened in Iberville Dining Hall at an evening meal, and as 
soon as it was discovered, according to Joe D'Avanzo, director 
of food services, the impure food was removed. 

Last week the Current Sauce was notified about the in- 
cident. An editorial was written, but before it could be pub- 
lished, faculty members and administrators were contacted, 
the incident was investigated and discussed, and parts of the 
editorial account were proven vague and unable to be veri- 
fied. As a result, after being advised that its publication could 
lead to a lawsuit against the paper or its editor, the Current 
Sauce did not print the editorial. 

Within days after the Current Sauce brought up the 
question of food services efficiency, cafeteria student work- 
ers were, for the first time, notified of the required blood 
tests, which, by state law, must be administered to anyone 
working in public dining facilities. 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 



Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobbv Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Facultv Advisor 

Reporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann. Danny Boutwell, Gail Dooley, 
Ray King, Gidget Maxwell, Jack Mont- 
gomery, Garland Riddle, Shirley Rut- 
ledge, Alton Sanders, Ed Thompson, 
Thomas Turner and Virginia Ann Wo- 
olen. 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



1967 



Friday, November 3, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 




erf* cocw*^"' 



09 e<& 





If your major 

is listed here, 
IBM would like 

to talk with you 

November 15th 





I '.'.Vf'.l.l ' Iv I'VO'lU '." 



Sign up for an interview at your placement office— even 
if you're headed for graduate school or military service. 

V/hy is IBM interested in so many different people? 

The basic reason is growth. Information processing is 
the fastest growing, fastest changing major industry in the 
world. IBM products are being used to solve problems in 
government, business, law, education, medicine, science, the 
humanities— just about any area you can name. We need peo- 
ple with almost every kind of background to help our custom- 
ers solve their problems. Thai's why we'd like to talk with you. 

What you can do at IBM 

Whatever your major, you can do a lot of good things at 
IBM. Change the world (maybe). Make money (certainly). 



Continue your education (through any of several plans, in- 
cluding a Tuition Refund Program). And have a wide choice 
of places to work (we have over 300 locations throughout 
the United States). 

What to do next 

We'll be on campus to interview for careers in Market- 
ing, Computer Applications, Programming, Research, Design 
and Development, Manufacturing, and Finance and Admin- 
istration. If you can't make a campus interview, send an out- 
line of your interests and educational background to Mr. C. F. 
Cammack, IBM Corporation, 1447 Peach- 
tree St. , N.E. , Rm. 8 1 0, Atlanta, Ga. 30309. 
We're an equal opportunity employer. 



mm. 



rage 4 



i HE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 3, 1967 



A Rebuttal 



LETTERS 



Noting The Decline Of American Femininity Girl A 9 rees 



(Editor's Note: This feature 
story was written by Sauce Co- 
Sports Editor Jay Keppel in re- 
buttal to last week's article by 
Elizabeth Ann Sedgwick, "The 
Decline of American Masculinity." 
This story DOES NOT reflect the 
opinions of the editor, who being 
a woman, is appalled by Mr. Kep- 
pel's attitude.) 

Men of America, we must 
unite! We are faced with a 
unique problem. The women of 
this country are becoming lazy, 
brazen, pushbutton-alligned hu- 
man robots, and in general are 
ruining the time honored age- 
old American concept of Women, 
Motherhood and Apple Pie. i 

Less than a hundred years ago, 
women were considered special 
creatures, to be pampered cod- 
dled, loved and respected.; They 
wore feminine clothing, little or 
no make-up, never stepped into 
the affairs of men, went very 
few places (except to church 
socials) and were perfectly con- 
tent to raise families. 

They loved to keep their mod- 
est homes immaculately clean, 
they took great pride in their 
cullinary skills and baked marve- 
lous things like bread, cookies, 
cakes and pies; they thought 
nothing of putting in a 12-hour 
day because, after all, their men 
had to slave for them and their 
families, and that was the least 
they could do in return, right?? 

Right! For a while, anyway. 
Then some jilted old DAR mem- 
ber decided that women should 
be seen and he a rd, and the bat- 
tle of the sexes came to pass. 



Fanatical old maids tromped 
through the streets proclaiming 
"Women's Soverignty" and other 
such terms. Actually, if these 
kindly old hags had been mar- 
ried, they surely wouldn't have 
been out rabble-rousing, but 
since they weren't, they had to 
get even with the men some way, 
right? Of course! 

Today the average woman is an 
ego-maniac. She has come to be- 
lieve that she has a vast knoow- 
ledge of anything from mathe- 
ematics to athletics, but don't 
mention homemaking — that's 
only for the non-educated. And, 
after all, doesn't a high school 
diploma and a couple of years of 
college earn her the title of a 
learned woman of the World? 

In place of the polite, petite 
thing of beauty that the Ante- 
bellum days are remembered for, 
we see a hideous creature, en- 
shrouded in psychedelic colors 
and plastered with paints until 
she resembles an Indian heading 
for Custer's Last Stand. 

She'll call you a coward, and 
beguile you with the courage of 
men of years gone by, but ask 
her why she doesn't take a Flor- 
ence Nightingale approach to 
Viet Nam, and volunteer for the 
nurse corps, then you'll hear 
about how unqualified she is for 
such demanding duties. 

At the drop of a pin, she'll 
launch into a diatribe about the 
lack of manners among men. But 
if you open a door for her, or 
pick-up a dropped book, don't ex- 
pect to get a sweet, 'Thank you,'' 



just a sneered smile that reads, 
"Get lost, creep!" 

She'll harass you about a two- 
dollar date, while explaining 
about the cost of the preparation 
she suffered for it. Next time tell 
her to save the $20 and give it 
to her poor boy friend. 

Any girl will harangue about 
looking for a "sinister place for 
recompose," but fails to realize 
that if she didn't go out on a date 
dressed more appropriately for 
the Folies Bergiere than for a 
movie, she wouudn't excite the 
male sex drive; and besides, 
whatever happened to the word, 
"No?" 

College girls particularly think 
nothing of making her date wait, 
no matter how late she might be. 
Perhaps she wants proper atten- 



tion by walking in late, so that 
everyone can see u er new sack. 

Married women wonder why 
their husbands get fed-up with 
them, but they never suspect that 
their own inattention is the root 
of the problem. 

And last, but not least, she'll 
dreamily explain the wonderful 
European man, who is a genius 
in his time. He is charming (but 
don't ask her what he says), he 
is masculine (but don't ask her 
to define "masculine"), and he 
has managed to keep his women 
content (but don't ask her how 
that can be done, by any means. 1 ). 

American women are the luck- 
iest in the world, and maybe 
someday, they'll realize it. 

Right? 

Right! 



Sunday Marks Start 
Of Education Week 



Looking for challenge ? 

Satisfaction? 
Opportunity for growth ? 

PLAN YOUR 
CAREER IN 

ROCKET AND 
MISSILE 

PROPULSION 



'How Good Are Our Schools,' 
will be the national theme for the 
American Education Week, Sun- 
day thru Saturday, according 
to William Bryant, local SLTA 
president. 

The national Education Week 
designed to place emphasis on 
the nation's teachers and schools. 

In observance of Education 
Week, the Student LTA will host 
a reception in Varnado's Drawing 
Room for all educators in the 
Natchitoches area, Wednesday 
from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. All 



SLTA members as well as college 
faculty are invited and urged to 
attend. 

Plans for the forthcoming re- 
ception were made during the 
SLTA's monthly meeting last 
Thursday, according to President 
Bryant. Also at the meeting, 
members heard three guest 
speakers, Renu Sugaratujndara 
of Thailand, Jill Swisher of 
Greece and Oscar Acevedo of 
Columbia, South America, speak 
on the differences in education 
systems. 




EXPLORE the potential for profes- 
sional achievement at the Naval Ord- 
nance Station, Indian Head, Maryland. 

Few technical fields offer you as many 
opportunities for an exciting and re- 
warding career as the rapidly growing 
field of chemical propulsion. Indian Head 
is a recognized leader in research, de- 
velopment, production, and evaluation 
of propellants and rocket propulsion 
systems and has advanced the state-of- 
the-art of chemical propulsion through 
participation with the Department of 
Defense and NASA. Indian Head has 
made important contributions to the Po- 



laris, Poseidon, and Sidewinder propul- 
sion systems as well as virtually every 
missile system in use by the Fleet today. 

Located 25 miles south of Washing- 
ton, D.C., Indian Head is close to the 
cultural, social, and scientific advan- 
tages of the Nation's Capital offering 
opportunities for pleasant suburban or 
country life within a few miles of moun- 
tain and shore resorts. 

Professional positions available in: 
Engineering 

Aerospace Electronics 
Chemical Industrial 
Electrical Mechanical 



Science 

Chemistry 
Physics 



Other 

Accounting 
Mathematics 



Liberal career Civil Service benefits 
include graduate study at nearby univer- 
sities with tuition expenses reimbursed. 

Career positions are also available for 
BUSINESS and LIBERAL ARTS graduates 
in finance, procurement, personnel ad- 
ministration, computer programming. 

Naval Ordnance Station 
Indian Head, Maryland 20640 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



With Sedgwick 
About Men 

I would like to commend Miss 
Sedgwick on her excellent article 
on the decline of American 
masculinity. 

Uudaubtedly, such a contro- 
versial subject has aroused many 
opinions both pro and con con- 
cerning the state of the American 
male in today's society. I have 
never had the opportunity of 
encountering association with the 
European male, so I am therefore 
unqualified to state a compar- 
ison. However, I do agree quite 
fervently with the view that the 
position of masculinity is on a 
steady downfall. I feel the article 
was a bit exaggerated, but its 
basic content was nevertheless a 
reality and expressed most ade- 
quately. 

It may be thought by the male 
of the species that there is a 
decline in femininity, but what 
way is there to turn when the 
men are becoming so predom- 
inently spineless - the women 
must assume a role of responsi- 
bility. 

In conclusion, I hope the arti- 
cle of last week opened a few 
eyes so the American male will 
resume his role as the stronger 
sex and make it a man's world 
once again before in reality, 
"it is too late." 

Gayle Harvey 

SGA Minutes— 

Cont. from Page 2) 

Dean Fulton's mother had passed away 
early Monday morning and this was 
why he was not present. Flowers have 
been sent on behalf of the SGA. 

Daphana Smith brought the sketch 
of the girls senior dinner ring from 
Josten's ring company. A discussion 
took place and Maxwell moved the AWS 
give more suggestions to Mr. Johnson 
at the Thursday night meeting. Lowe 
seconded. Question called by Willis. 
Motion passed. 

Maxwell said that he and Bill Fowler 
has just returned from the Deans con- 
ference at LSU on Sunday. They will 
present a full report at the next regu- 
lar meeting. Maxwell did present cer- 
tain ideas for thought to the SGA: 

(1) There is a need for an increased 
number of advisors to the SGA be- 
cause of need and convenience. 

(2) There is a need to find out the dis- 
missal regulations on a student here 
at NSC — especially if this stays on 
his record throughout his college 
career even if he should return to 
college and graduate. Some schools 
remove this and others do not. 

(3) He stressed the need to be involved 
with the administration more on 
such decisions as dismissal policies. 
We deserve the right as students to 
have a part in evaluation of teach- 
ers at our college, etc. 

Kevill brought to the attention of 
the SGA the seating problem at the 
homecoming game. The problem is be- 
ing referred to the school spirit com- 
mittee. 

Kirk moved the meeting be ad- 
journed. Seconded by Ramsey. Meet- 
ing adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 

PLEASE VOTE 




Representative on Campus NOVEMBER 17 



For interview, contact your placement office 



No. 116 
HERMAN R. REED 
SHERIFF 

Natchitoches Parish 

20 Years Experience With 
Louisiana State Police 



Friday, November 3, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 



Religious Opera Leads Off Season; 
Williams, National Ballet Set Next 




The fascinating sounds of music by 
British composer Benjamin Britten filled 
the Fine Arts Auditorium last night as 
"Curlew River" came to campus, resplen- 
dent in costume and remarkable for its 
uniform excellence of performance. 

The religious opera, performed by 
the Little Orchestra Society of New York, 
was the first of four programs scheduled 
for the Northwestern-Natchitoches Sym- 
phony Society 1967-68 concert season. 

The National Ballet, complete with 
scenery, costumes, orchestra, and out- 
standing dance artists, will appear Feb- 
ruary 8. A concert by world-famous pian- 
ist Roger Williams is set for Feb. 26 in 
Prather Coliseum. The United States 
Navy Band will round out the season 
March 26. 

College students will be admitted to 
all programs by I D cards. 




* * « <• *• 



'Curlew River 
Costume Sketch 



National Ballet 
In Rehearsal 




Famous Hands of Roger Williams - 
Musicianship and Showmanship 



Political Science 
Club Opens Drive 
For Membership 

With the acceptance of Mr. Dan 
D. Gardner as its sponsor last 
week, the Political Science Club 
began its second year here on 
campus. 

The first meeting was called to 
order by club president Rodney 
Elkins. It was suggested that 
a membership drive be initiated 
to replace most of the club's 
original 15 members who graduat- 
ed last spring. 

The club has been invited to 
attend a political science con- 
vention in December at Texas 
A & M. The club has also been 
invited to attend the regional 
political science convention in 
April at New Orleans. The con- 
vention will be in the form of 
a mock U.N. 

Political Science Calendar: 

Tues., Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. — Speaker, 
Rodney Elkins; topic: Ameri- 
can Democratic Creed. 

Tues., Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. — Speaker, 
Nelson A. Moak; topic: Pos- 
sible Presidential Candidates 
for 1968. 

Tues., Dec. 12 at 7 p.m. — Speak- 
er, Walter E. Moak; topic: Riots 
in American Cities. Also an 
open meeting will be held for 
interested students. 

Tues., Jan. 2 at 7 p.m. — no speak- 
er. Plans will be adopted for 
admission of the club into the 
National Political Science So- 
ciety. 



IFC Dubs Five 
For Top Offices 



Joe Germany has been re- 
elected president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council. A mem- 
ber of Sigma Tau Gamma, 
Germany served the group 
as president in the spring of 
1967. 

Serving with Germany will be 
Joey Calloway, Sigma Tau Gam- 
ma, first vice president; James 
Boswell, Tau Kappa Epsilon, sec- 
ond vice president; Freddy Lit- 
ton, Pi Kappa Phi, secretary; 
Tommy Ferguson, Pi Kappa Phi, 
treasurer; and Will Moriston, in- 
tramurals chairman. 

Dean of Men Leonard Nichols 
serves as sponsor. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

Kappa Alpha captured second 
Place in the Greek division of the 
Homecoming display contest and 
an overall rating of honorable 
mention. Designer for the prize- 
winning exhibit was Lin Leeth. 

In the area of civic projects, 
the KA's are helping to restore 
the old Rocque house on the 
riverbank. The fraternity has also 
contributed to the building fund 
for the restoration project. 

PI KAPPA PHI 

Members of Pi Kappa Phi are 
Planning to attend the frater- 
nity's district meeting in Baton 
Rouge on Saturday. Chapters to 
be represented include LSU, 
McNeese and East Texas State 
University of Commerce, Tex. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

The Tau's will hold two dances 
Saturday. Prior to the game with 
the McNeese Cowboys, the fra- 
ternity will dance to the music 
°f "The Regular Size". Following 
the game will be a victory dance 
with music provided by the same 
band. Members of the band are 
all members of Sigma Tau. 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

Dave Hardin has been elected 
president of the fall pledge class 
of Tau Kappa Epsilon. Other of- 
ficers include Mike Sloblosky, 
vice president; Terry Thrash, 
secretary-treasurer. 

The new pledge officers will 
join their brothers as hosts at a 
dance honoring the McNeese 
TKE's, who are coming up for the 
football game Saturday. 



Ground Broken For 
New BSU Center 

Ground breaking ceremonies, 
October 23, 1967, marked a mile- 
stone for Baptist students at NSC. 
The occasion officially initiated 
construction of the new $180,000 
BSU Center 

The new structure will feature 
a chapel with seating capacity 
for 350, a lounge area, recreation 
and dining area, offices, kitchen, 
council room, library, and prayer 
room. 

Miss Myra Gulledge, local 
director of the BSU for the past 
sixteen years, will continue to 
reside at the Center in this capa- 
city. 




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Your Co-ed 

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Bakers Town and Campus Bookstore 



YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN 
OPTIMATION SPEED READING 
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Whether you find yourself on a Safari, in your school 
classroom or at your desk in your office, OPTIMATION 
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and professional reading. How would you like to be 
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FREE INITIAL CLASSES 
Natchitoches High School 

Tuesday, Nov. 7 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 
Wednesday, Nov. 8 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 
Monday, Nov. 13 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 
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For Information call 352-2303 between 8:30 a.m. & 4:30 p.m. 
Sponsored by the NATCHITOCHES JAYCEES 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 3, 1967 




JAMES WYATT attempts a field goal during a recent afternoon 
practice session in Prather Coliseum. The rangy, all-GSC guard will 
be one of the main factors in helping the Demons climb higher in the 
conference basketball standings. 



Intramurals Swing Into High Gear 
With Basketball And Track Events 



Intramural activity leaves 
touch football by the wayside, and 
gets into full swing next week 
with various sporting events oc- 
curing in the Men's Gymnasium. 

Heading the list of attractions 
will be the beginning of the 
Men's basketball league. Games 
will be limited to two a week for 
each team, and the team roster 
may not include more than 10 
members. 

Hard-court actions officially 
get underway Tuesday night at 
6:00 p.m. in the Gymnasium. 

Track activities in the Intra- 
mural program will be high- 
lighted by the cross-country event 
taking place Thursday afternoon. 

The meet will begin in front 
of the Men's Gym and will con- 
tinue past the Coliseum and cul- 



minate in front of the Gym. 

Any individual or regular In- 
tramural team may enter con- 
testants in the event. Entry dead- 
line for this event is Tuesday 
afternoon. 

In the men's singles ping-pong 
tournament held last Thursday in 
the Student Union, Rick Lacy of 
Shreveport placed first, Jerry 
Brown second, and Ben Jones in 
third. 

Touch football teams ended 
their season play last Thursday 
afternoon with the Other 9 taking 
the first place honors for the 
second year in a row by defeating 
Kappa Sigma 6-0. 

Other teams in the playoffs 
were The Uncouths, The Pas Bas 
Taus of Opelousas, The Wonder- 
ful Winos, and Sigma Tau Gam- 
ma. 



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One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
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In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 

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Conveniently located near the campus 



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Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



Demons-Cowboys Vie 
In Decisive Contest 



"Recovery" will be the key 
word tomorrow night as the 
Demon football squad at- 
tempts to recover from the 
shock of last week's upset 
loss to Troy State, and regain 
their winning ways when they 
return to GSC competition by 
hosting the McNeese Cow- 
boys. 

The heated rivalry that occurs 
whenever these two opponents 
meet on the gridiron will be even 
stronger this year, since the De- 
mons and Cowboys are presently 
deadlocked for the conference 
lead with identical 2-0 records. 

McNeese has defeated confer- 
ence foes Northeast and South- 
eastern, while the Demons have 
defeated the Monroe Tribe and 
trimmed Tech 7-0 two weeks ago. 

Last year the Demons edged 
the Cowboys 14-6, in a tough de- 
fensive contest played in Lake 
Charles. 

The Cowboys' GSC statistics 
are not impressive for a league 
leader as they are ranked fifth 
in GSC total offense with 1,373 
yards gained in six games for 
an average of 228.8 per contest. 

Leading the offensive charges 
is quarterback David Bourgeois, 
who is second among GSC backs 
with 106 yards rushing and 375 
passing for a total of 481 yards. 

Bourgeois is ranked fourth 
among the conference passers 
with 28 completions for 375 yards 
and tw"o touchdowns. 

His favorite target is split end 
R.C. Slocum, who has 21 recep- 
tions for 261 yards and one touch- 
down. 



Defense seems to be the key to 
the Cowboy victories in confer- 
ence competition as they have 
allowed an average of 157 yards 
rushing and 130 passing per con- 
tent. 

However, the Cowboys defen- 
sive secondary has been leaky 
in some respects, as they have 
allowed 70 completions in 155 
attempts. 

Although stymied last Satur- 
day afternoon by the tough Troy 
defense, the potent Demon of- 
fensive attack should be ready 
for an all-out assault on the Cow- 
boy defense. 

The ground game has run for 
1,619 yards in 328 attempts and 
nine touchdowns. Vic Nyvall is 
still the leading ball carrier on 
the team with 311 yards gained 
in 48 carries for a 6.4 average. 

The throwing duo of Don Gui- 
dry and Malcolm Lewis should 
do Well against the Cowboy pass 
defense, and so far have com- 
pleted 38 of 83 passes for 569 
yards and two tallies. 

Saturday night's encounter 
may provide the Demon football 
fan with What he has been 
hoping for all season, an aerial 
circus by Guidry and Lewis. 

Statistics indicate that the 
Cowboys defensive wall has been 
stingy with rushing yardage thus 
far, and will be well-prepared 
for supreme effort against the 
Demon groud corps. 

The vital question in tomor- 
row's game is whether the De- 
mons will forget last Saturday 
afternoon and regain their early 
season and repeat as GSC cham- 
pions. 



Clayton Announces Schedule 
For Spring Baseball Season 



Head baseball coach Jack Clay- 
ton announced his tentative dia- 
mond schedule for the 1968 sea- 
son this past week. 

This year the schedule will con- 
sist of a 34 game slate, and will 
include such collegiate power- 
houses as Lamar Tech and East 
Texas Baptist. . 
Four freshman games have been 
scheduled with Panola Junior 
College. 

The Demons, who finished first 
in the GSC pennant race last year 
with a 16-8 conference record, 
will have 12 returning lettermen. 

Returning lettermen include 
in-fielders Danny Bob Turner, 
Harry Wilmore, Leroy Husser' 



and Jackie Lewis. 

Outfielders coming back are 
Mike Herron, David Smith, and 
Maurice Hendrix. 

Pitchers returning are Wayne 
Jowers, Ed Hartfield, Tony Ala- 
rio, and Don Shields. 

The team has been holding 
daily afternoon workouts on the 
baseball diamond since the fall 
semester began, and these have 
been highlighted by intramural 
scrimmages twice a week. 

Clayton has indicated that in- 
clement weather during the win- 
ter months will force the team 
indoors to Prather Coliseum 
where they will practice on the 
basic fundamentals of the game. 



DEAN FULTON: 

WILL COLLEGE OR CHART- 
ERED BUSES BE PROVIDED 
FOR STUDENT TRANSPORTA- 
TION TO LAFAYETTE AND 
HAMMOND FOR THE USL AND 
SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE 
GAMES??? 



lie Medium Point 1S< 



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Restoration of old photographs Weddings 
Picture frames Greek parties 



Friday, November 3. 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Troy's Passing Attack 
From Down Under Topples Demons 28-20 



With Jay Keppel 



One Battle's Lost, But The War Goes On 

Yes, fans, the Demons are human. The 15-game winning 
streak that had begun with the final game of the 1965 season 
found its terminal point last week in a heartbreaking loss to 
the Red Wave of Troy State, Ala. 

Although the eventual outcome of the game seemed evi- 
dent after the beginning of the second half, the Demon 
eleven fought back valiantly twice in the final moments of 
play in an attempt to turn the tide. Perhaps their finest 
moment came as the last seconds clicked off with quarter- 
back Donald Guidry connecting on a number of desperation 
passes, knowing that with the score reading 28-20, the best 
the team could do was tie, if they could get another touch- 
down, and if they could connect for a two-point conversion 
after it. They displayed the true Demon spirit, and the great 
poise that the 1967 gridiron squad is noted for. 

Air Assault Stymies Demon Defenses 

The tale of the game revolves around a passer named 
Sim Byrd. The Wave quarterback picked apart the apparently 
befuddled Demon defensive backs with discouraging elan. 
Byrd threw and threw and threw some more to a host of 
waiting arms. After the pigskin had returned to earth, the 
Troy men had 318 yards passing. Compounding the 
situation was the unusually meek pass-rush by the Demon 
linemen. The team fought on equal terms in every other 
statistic. 

True Sportsmen-like Conduct Prevails 

Also commendable was the attitude displayed by all of 
the contestants in a game that was continually swelling with 
emotion right up to the final horn. The Demons were only 
penalized 60 yards and the Red Wave 65 yards, in as clean a 
battle as one could expect to see. There were very few per- 
sonal fouls, and only one possible fight, with that one coming 
on the final play of the game. 

All Good Things Must Eventually End 

The loss is nothing to be ashamed of, by any means. 
Although the students and old grads were disappointed, no 
one could complain about lack of spirit by the footballers. 
They got tough when the chips were down, but their effort fell 
short. 

We believe that some good can be gleaned from any 
unfortunate situation. We believe that since the pressure 
of winning number 15 or 16 or whatever is off, the Demons 
can settle back and soundly whip their last three opponents. 
To Deacon Lewis — An Apology 

After last week's issue came out, there arose a mild 
furor about some of the commentary that appeared in "From 
Down Under" regarding the Tech game. Focal point of this 
was a purported derogatory slash at Deacon Lewis' two field 
goal attempts, which were termed "feeble." 

Had it not been for one overlooked factor, the term would 
have been justifiable. However, in our haste, we had not con- 
sulted with Coach Gossett about the squad's physical or 
mental status, and were not aware that Lewis was kicking 
against Tech on sheer guts, as he was still feeling a severe 
right leg injury, and had not kicked in practice all week in 
order not to aggravate it further. For this oversight we apolo- 
gise to Deacon Lewis. 

An editorial written by Co-Sports Editor Bob Ardoin 
concerning the sports department's attitudes toward object- 
ive writing can be found on page two. 

Medium Meticulously Meditates. . .Then Retires 

Our Unknown Person has chosen not to continue with 
his predicting problems, and has retired, horoscopes and all, 
for the season with a two-week average of .750. So, it's back 
to FDU again, and here's how we see it all around the GSC: 
Northwestern State College 21 
McNeese State College 13 
Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana 14 
Arkansas State 6 
Louisiana Tech 24 
Southeastern Louisiana 17 
Eastern Michigan 20 
Northeast State 14 



By Bobby Ardoin 

The aerial accuracy of Troy 
State's Sim Byrd and the timely 
receptions by his sure-handed 
receivers stunned a capacity 
crowd in Demon Stadium Sat- 
urday afternoon as the under- 
dog Red Wave toppled the Dem- 
ons from the ranks of the un- 
beaten 28-20. 

A spellbound homecoming 
audience watched in silence as 
the shify signal caller protected 
by a massive offensive wall com- 
pleted 23 of 35 passes for 318 
yards and three touchdowns. 

Byrd's deadly aim erased a slim 
7-6 Demon halftime lead, and 
forced the host team to abandon 
their normal ball control pattern 
and take to the air in attempt to 
overcome the eight point deficit. 

Although coming out on the 
short end of the score, the crush- 
ing Demon attack accounted for 
161 yards on the ground, while 
the tosses of Don Guidry and 
Malcolm Lewis netted another 
132. 

Saturday's loss marks the first 
over a three year span for the 
Purple and White, and halts 
their record breaking school win 
streak at fifteen. 

The Red Wave drew first blood 
in the contest after obtaining 
possession of the ball following 
a missed field goal attempt by 
Demon Phillip Creel. 

Sparked by the throwing of 
Byrd and the catches of glue- 
finged Bobby Enslen and Jerry 
Yeager, the men from Troy 
marched 94 yards in 13 plays for 
the tally. 

On a first down situation at 
the Demon two, Byrd pitched to 
fullback Bobby Hiers who shook 
off several tacklers and fell into 
the end zone for the six points. 

After sputtering for nearly two 
periods, the Demon offense adj- 
usted itself and shifted into high 
gear in the fading minutes of the 
first half to put ther first six 
points on the stadium scoreboard. 

Dick Concillio gave the Demons 
the break they needed by inter- 
cepting a stray Byrd pass, and 
enabled the hometown crew to get 
the pigskin on the 43. 

Traveling on the arm of Guidry, 
the Demons moved the ball to the 
visitors seven in five plays. After 
completing aerials to halfback 
Vic Nyvall and split end Jerry 
Mott, Guidry personally set up 
the score by carrying the ball 
within scoring range. 

On the next play, Guidry danc- 
ed behind the line of scrimmage 
and fired to Nyvall in the end 
zone for the score. 

Malcolm Lewis' boot was per- 
fect, and the Demons withdrew 
into the locker room with a 7-6 
halftime lead. 

Troy didn't waste any time 



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getting started in the second half 
as they took the kickoff and pro- 
ceeded down the field for another 
six points. 

Byrd once again seemed to 
ignite the Red Wave drive as he 
threw completions to his favor- 
ite targets Enslen and Yeager. 

On a third and seven situation 
at the Demon 12, Byrd dropped 
back into the pocket and lofted 
a scoring toss to Yeager for an- 
other tally. 

Moore booted the ball through 
the uprights for the PAT, and 
Troy led 13-7 with 9:48 remain- 
ing in the quarter. 

Not to be outdone, the Demons 
end Mace Morris pounced on a 
loose Troy ball on the Red Wave 
35. 

With Malcolm Lewis calling 
the signals and Alwyn Phillips 
providing yardage with crushing 
runs, the Demons shaked and 
faked their way deep into Troy 
territory. 

On a third and goal situation, 
Nyvall took a handoff from Lewis, 
and pushed his way through the 
defensive wall of Troy for the 
score. 

Lewis, PAT allowed the Demons 
to go head with 1:58 left in the 
third period by a slim 14-13 
margin. 

The Demon lead was short- 
lived however, as Troy, infuriated 
by the defecit took the kickoff 
and passed their way to paydirt. 

The elusive Byrd whirled and 
hurled the Red Wave to their 
score by passing to Yeagers and 
Hiers for curcial yardage. 

Leading Troy ground gainer 
Jeff Cotten, appearing in the con- 
test for the first time, moved the 
ball to the Demon eleven. 

On third down, Byrd sprinted 
out toward right end, then cocked 
his arm and hit flanker back 



Danny Grant for the score. " . 

Moore's kick made the score 
21-14 in Troy's favor with 12:20 
left in the fourth period. 

Troy defensive halfback Ronnie 
Shelly enabled the Red Wave to 
put an insurance six points on the 
scoreboard late in the period 
when he intercepted a Lewis 
pass, and ran it back to the De- 
mon 15. 

On the first play from scrim- 
mage in the series, Byrd caught 
the Demon secondary napping, 
and fired a scoring aerial to end 
Jimmy Hendrick. 

Trying desperately to get back 
into the ballgame, the Demons 
took the kickoff and went 76 
yards in 10 plays for their third 
score. 

Guidry's aerial manuevers 
penetrated the Red Wave defense 
as he hit Jerry Mott three times 
with passes to move the ball with- 
in scoring range. 

With fourth down on the De- 
mon 29, Guidry faded back and 
hit end Chester Wroten deep in 
the end zone for the final De- 
mon tally. 

The two point conversion failed 
when Guidry slipped while at- 
tempting to scan right end. 

Tomorrow night the Demons 
will attempt to regain their win- 
ning ways when they face Mc- 
Neese in a GSC encounter in De- 
mon Stadium at 7:30 



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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 3, 1967 



Debaters Cop Wins At 
Competitive Tourney 



Four intrepid teams of deba 
ters, under the direction of De- 
bate Coach Ray Schexnider, at- 
tended their first competition of 
the debate season this past week- 
end at San Jacinto Junior College 
in Pasadena, Texas. 

Raymond Rogers and Rick 
Ader made a strong showing at 
the tournament with four wins 
and six losses in the senior men's 
division, competing against such 
strong schools as Rice, the Uni- 
versity of Houston, and USL, 
which produce some of the most 
noted debate teams in the South. 

Making another strong showing 
with 3-3 records were the team 
of Susie Chancey and Lynn 



Hellinghausen and the team of 
Chris Keeler and Nancy Martin. 

Freshman debaters Bruce Ke- 
vil and David Precht, who will 
be debating in the novice divi- 
sion throughout the year, gained 
experience in the senior divi- 
sion at San Jacinto. 

The topic for debate at the 
tournament was "Resolved: That 
the federal government should 
guarantee a minimum annual 
cash income to all citizens." 
This topic will continue as the 
focal point of discussion through- 
out the year. 

The next tournament will be at 
Louisiana Tech where eight 
teams are slated to attend. 




MUSIC MEN — Four Freshmen members of the Natchitoches-North- 
western Symphony Society have been granted scholarships by that 
musical organization for their participation in the symphony. Scholar- 
ship recipients are (left to right) Tom Jones of Shreveport, Paul 
Price of Pineville, Dickie Howell of Baton Rouge, all violonists, and 
Sam Caldwell of Shreveport, celoist. 

Karate Club To Offer 
Setf-Defense Course 



The first official meeting of 
the school's new Karate Club will 



It's What's Happening 



Friday, November 3 

Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all day 
Cross Country Track Team, "NSC vs. 

McNeese," Lake Charles, 3:30 p.m. 
Movie, "A Very Special Favor," SU 

Ballroom, 8 p.m. 
Saturday, November 4 

Football Game, NSC vs. McNeese, 
Demon Stadium, 7:30 p.m. 
Monday, November 6 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, 6 p.m. 
AWS Council Meeting, SU 315, 
4:15 p.m. 

AWS General Meeting, Varnado, 8 p.m. 
Telephone Training Program, SU 320, 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Tuesday, November 7 



Play Rehearsal, FA Auditorium, all 
day 

PEM Club Meeting, Women's Gym- 
nasium, 6:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, November 8 

SLTA Reception for American Edu- 
cation Week, Varnado Drawing 
Room, 3:30 p.m. 
Thursday, November 9 

Euthenics Club Meeting, Home Ec. 

Living Room, 6:30 p.m. 
SU Entertainment Committee Meeting, 

SU 241, 4 p.m. 
Intercollegiate Enterprises Tutoring 

SU 308, 313, 315, 6 to 10 p.m. 
Phi Kappa Phi Elecetion, Williamson 

108, 6:30 p.m. 



Beta Beta Beta 
Elects Officers, 
Plans Activities 

Wayne Horn has been chosen 
to head the Delta Theta chapter 
of the Tri Beta National Biolog- 
ical Honor Society during the 
organization's meeting Monday 
night. 

Elected to serve with Holrn 
were Eric J. Bienveriu, vice-pres- 
ident; Sandra Liberto, secretary; 
Roger Hammons, treasurer; and 
Betty Williams, historian. 

Horn and the group's other 
officers wilj preside over thie 
organization during the year and 
oversee Tri Beta's activities, such 
as initiation, the award's banquet 
and annual picnic. 



be held Wednesday, at 5 p.m. 
This meeting, as well as all fu- 
ture ones, is located in Room 1 
of the Men's Gym. The club is 
open to men and women students, 
yince both sexes shall be given 
equal opportunities to excel. 

Serving as instructor is Pat- 
rick Harrington, a graduate stu- 
dent in special education. He is 
an ex-Marine, and holds the black 
belt in Karate. 

The club is affiliated with the 
Japan Karate Association, and 
will be directly associated with 
the Shreveport Club. All ranks 
earned will be bona fide and in- 
disputable. 

The club will function on a 
periodic basis throughout the 
year. Membership in the first 
class will close on November 22, 
so that the inaugural class may 
complete their basic instruction. 
A new class will be organized in 
three months. 

All are welcome to participate 
in fast-rising college sport, the 
art of unarmed combat. 



National Executives Westminster Plans 

Rate Nursing School 



Representatives of the Na 
tional League for Nursing visited 
and reviewed the college's nur- 
sing department this week for 
the renewing of the school's nur- 
sing accreditation. 

The school of nursing, which 
was nationally accredited in 1959, 
is inspected every eight years by 
Nursing League officials who re- 
port and recommend reaccredi- 
tation for the school to the Na- 
tional Board of Review. 

The two NLN representatives 
on campus this week were Bar- 
bara Wilcox and Lois Knowles. 



Both met with members of the 
administration, and nursing fa- 
culty during the week, and with 
nursing students at a coffee re- 
ception Monday and Tuesday in 
the Student Union. 

Miss Wilcox is a member of 
the Department of Bacculaureate 
and Higher Degrees for the Na- 
tional League for Nursing and 
Miss Knowles is the Assistant 
Dean and Director of Under- 
graduates program at the Univer- 
sity of Florida's College of Nur- 
sing. 



Open House 

Some 15 years ago, the Louisi- 
ana Synod purchased the present 
Westminster House for a newly- 
organized group of Presbyterian 
College Students. 

Since that time, many changes 
have been made and most impor- 
tant among the improvements is 
the remodeling of the house, just 
completed this fall. 

Open house will be conducted 
Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. for all 
interested persons to tour the 
newly-remodeled building. 

On Wednesday, all students are 
invited to join the Westminster 
group in a dicussion on "Who is 
God?" 



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LOST AND FOUND 

Judy Joshlin, 106 E. Varnado, 
has someone's beige coat left 
last week in Iberville Cafeteria. 
Returning there to find her own 
beige coat, she picked up the only 
one left — the wrong one. If you 
have hers and wish to exchange, 
call Judy at Ext. 6401. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
I Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 



For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Now Through 
Saturday 

Dean Martin 
George Peppard 
Jean Simmons 

"ROUGH NIGHT 
, IN JERICHO" 

Color 

Starts Sunday 

They're Young — 
They're in Love — 
And Kill People 

Warren Beatty 
Faye Dunaway 

"BONNIE AND 
CLYDE" 



CHIEF , 

D R l VE r -lN v | 



Last Times Tonight 

John Wayne 

Robert Mitchum 

"EL DORADO" 

Color 

Saturday 

Ann Margret 

"THE PLEASURE 
SEEKERS" 

Color 

— Co-Feature — 

Robert Morse 

'THE LOVED ONE' 

Sun - Mon - Tues 

George Peppard 
Ursula Andress 
James Mason 
'THE BLUE MAX' 

Color 

WEDNESDAY 
"Buck Night" 

"OH DAD, 
POOR DAD 

— Co-Feature — 

Brigitte Bardot 
"VIVA MARIA" 

Both in Color 



"Amphitryon 38" Opens For 
Two-Night Run Thursday 

Jean Giraudoux's classical farce "Amphitryon 38," 
adapted from the original French by S.N. Behrman, 
will be presented Thursday and Friday evenings at 
8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium as the second pro- 

1| duct ion of the fall College Theatre season. 

Leading the cast as Jupiter, king of the gods, is 
Shreveport graduate student Danny Gayer. Baton 
Rouge junior Suzy Hames plays opposite him as the 
tempting Alkmena, mortal wife of General Amphi- 

; k try on. 

Artie Visconte of Alexandria and Sheri Saleff of 
: p : Roselle. N.J.. head a supporting cast which includes 
; ; : Tony Rispoli, John Braden, Linda Newman, Ann 
■ & Stout, Kurt Simpson, and Leah Luckett. John E. 
- Josephson of Shreveport co-stars as Amphitryon. 
The production, which utilizes music, satirical cos- 
tumes, and elaborate sets, is under the direction and 
technical supervision of Assistant Professor of Speech 
111 Frank Magers. 

(See related story on page two.) 

■PI ,^..^„-^.,^^ m .^,^^ xmam ,. MM „« ^,^, \ null"] I fr -i ininnnmiii 

SGA Hears Spirited 
Speech By Maxwell 

By The Sauce 
Editorial Staff 

Scotty Maxwell, SGA treas- 
urer, in the face of such con- 
troversial items as traffic 
regulations and the speech 
forum, keynoted the Monday 
night SGA meeting with a 
dynamic speech calculated at 
inspiration and challenge. 

Attempting to arouse what is 
probably the most active SGA in 
the history of this college, Max- 
well's oratory glistened with stu- 
dent patriotism and a platform, or 
quasi-platform, of action. 

Typical aspects of Maxwell's 
vague and already partially com- 

Paul Shaw, 23, 
Killed In Auto 
Crash Sunday 

Paul E. Shaw, a 23-year-old 
senior majoring in zoology, was 
killed Sunday at 5:35 p.m. in a 
head-on collision one and a half 
miles from the Highway 509 in- 
tersection with Highway One 
near Coushatta. 

Critically injured in the acci- 
dent was Mrs. James Ferguson, 
wife of Dr. James Ferguson who 




urrent 



s 



auce 



Vol. LVI — No. 12 Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana Friday, Nov. 10, 1967 



Sounds Of Silence 





Paul Shaw 

was seriously injured in the col- 
lision. 

Paul, a graduate of Leesville 
High School, was a member of 
several high school organizations 
and participated in many of the 
athletic programs. He was also 
a member of the First Methodist 
Church of Leesville. 

Survivors include his parents, 
°r. and Mrs. E. M. Shaw, and a 
sister, Mrs. Celeste Bailey of Ba- 
ton Rouge. 



pleted program were a tutoring 
system for all students (which 
the AMS is already working on), 
a challenge to the SGA to begin 
to meddle in academic affairs, 
and the institution of a more com- 
plete assembly plan. 

It has been generally expressed 
that Maxwell's speech could 
greatly alter the whole complex- 
ion of the Student Government 
Association. 

Student Services 

Among other items which came 
up on the agenda Monday night 
was a report by Tony Rispoli, 
head of the campus services com- 
mittee. This committee has con- 
cerned itself with such projects 
as furnishing music in the Iber- 
ville Dining Hall (you may have 
noticed the snappy march tunes) 
and the student discount card, 
which the committee has been 
studying in conjunction with the 
Circle K service organization. 

The Speech Forum, which was 
proposed by debate coach Ray 
Schexnider, also found a place on 
the agenda and was the subject 
of a resolution which encouraged 
the speedy approval and institu- 
tion of this activity. The speech 
forum would be designed to bring 
controversies which concern stu- 
dents up for discussion in an or- 
ganized and effective manner. 

Traffic 

Also up for discussion were the 
current changes in traffic regu- 
lations. "It seems," one member 
quipped, "that many students 
think it is unreasonable to take 
a trip down the Robeline highway 
instead of across the campus." 
This action was referred to the 
traffic committee, which is head- 
ed by Bill Fowler. 

Also discussed was the seating 
for students at the football games. 
Finally, as the football season 
comes to a close, preparations are 
being made to prevent a similar 
problem next year. Joe Germany, 
chairman of the School Spirit 
Committee, congratulated those 
who had helped to promote school 
spirit throughout the year. 
Spirit Trophies 

Trophies for school spirit, 
which for years have been cir- 
culated among fraternities, sorori- 
ties, and other organizations, were 
made permanent, as further evi- 
dence of the increased stress be- 
ing placed upon school spirit. 

The meeting closed with dis- 
cussion on the upcoming Mr. and 
Miss NSC contest and the Lady 
of the Bracelet elections. Action 
on the issues of traffic regula- 
tions and student seating will 
require furtheer work and con- 
sideration. 



Simon And Garfunkel To 
Entertain Here Tuesday 



By Charles Skinner 

Paul Simon and Art Gar- 
funkel, who will bring their 
famed cerebral folk music to 
Prather Coliseum at 8 p.m., 
are among the few contem- 
porary artists who deserve to 
be taken seriously. 

Reaching a receptive pu- 
blic with such enduring hits 
as "The Sounds of Silence," 
"Homeward Bound," and, 
"I Am a Rock," Simon and 
Garfunkel quickly became 
known throughout the na- 
tion. 

Loosely described, their songs 
are in the mold of traditional 
folk with rock overtones. At the 
center of this music are preoc- 
cupations with loneliness, the 
illusory existence, the pain of 
time passing, and lack of eom- 
munciation. 

Following shows such as the 
Rocking Soul of Mitch Ryder 
and the harmonic soul of the Plat- 
ters, the cerebral soul of Simon 
and Garfunkel should form a 
logical and pleasing procession. 
However, to think that success 
came easily to the pair would be 
to ignore long hours of practice 
after school, the problems of be- 
ing two quite individual persons, 
and the long road through Green- 
wich Village Coffeehouses to Eng- 
land and finally back to the Uni- 
ted States. 

Simon and Garfunkel are ac- 
cutely attuned to the college in- 
tellect and reflect the doubts 
and he uncertainty present in 
each person who doesn't already 
have his life mapped out. Paul 
went to major in English at Que- 
ens College and Art went to Co- 
lumbia University where he is 
presently a graduate student. 

Paul and Art stand a bit to the 
side in the "message music" 
field simply because they do not 
swers. Paul numbers "people 
feel that they have all the an- 



are always sure they're 
as among the few things 



who 
right 

that he cannot tolerate. 

The student who goes to Tues- 
day night's show to hear the 
most beautiful harmonies in the 
world is sure to be disappointed 
as is the person who hopes to 
hear melodyies more beautiful 
than the choruses of Wagner and 
the one hoping for poetry the 
equal of William Shakespeare's. 
Art and Paul furnish a unique 
blend of all of these and come 
up with a style and manner of 



presentation that is all their own. 

Tickets to the show will be a- 
vailable at the door. NSC stu- 
dents who present their ID cards 
may purchase the tickets at $2.50. 
Other young people will be ad- 
mitted at a cost of $3; and adults 
will be assessed $3.50. 

The entertainment committee 
under the leadership of Bill Fow- 
ler is to be congratulated for its 
choice in performers. Fowler an- 
nounced that the Simon and Gar- 
funkel Show is the most costly 
that will be presented this year. 




TRADITIONAL FOLK with rock overtones is the description given 
music by Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, one of nation's best singing 
groups. Simon and Garfunkel, singing their hits, "Homeward Bound" 
and "I Am A Rock," will be in concert here Tuesday night at 8 p.m. 



Walking To Class, Says Fulton, 
Is Solution To Traffic Problems 



By Diane Nickerson, Editor 

"Park your car and walk 
to class," suggests Dean of 
Students Dudley Fulton in an 
effort to calm student drivers 
irate over the traffic restric- 
tion imposed last week on 
Sibley Drive. 

AH traffic exiting from park- 
ing lots on Sibley Drive is now 
being required to turn west to- 
ward College Avenue in compli- 
ance with an ordinance passed 
by the Natchitoches City Council. 

The street has not been re- 
stricted completely to one-way 
traffic, since westward traffic 
turning directly from College 
Avenue is still allowed to travel 
on Sibley Drive. 

"The object of this city ordi- 
nance," explained Fulton in an 
interview Wednesday, "is to im- 
mobilize the automobiles on cam- 
pus. 

"College traffic regulations are 
imposed not to make it easier on 
the driver BUT to make it hard- 
er. We must think of the safety 
of all the students. Since more 
students walk to class than drive, 
we are then concerned upmost 



with the pedestrian's safety." 
DRIVER INCONVENIENCE 

Fulton stressed that he and the 
student-faculty traffic committee 
were not worried about incon- 
veniencing the driver by restrict- 
ing traffic on Sibley Drive. He 
pointed out that the driver was 
inconvenienced purposely so that 
he would leave his car in the 
parking lot and walk. 

In commenting on the dis- 
gruntled statements being made 
by students on the traffic re- 
striction, Fulton explained that 
most of the criticism had come 
from student drivers residing in 
Rapides Hall. "However," he 
points out, "we can't endanger 
the 2800 migrating students on 
our campus for the convenience 
of the some 450 automobile dri- 
vers in the new dorms." 

Everyone on campus must 
abide by these traffic rules, 
stressed Fulton, as he explained 
that city traffic tickets are being 
given to all violators, both stu- 
dents and faculty members, by 
Campus Security Officers. 

Security Officers on campus 
are commissioned to make ar- 
rests and are bona fide law offi- 
cers, Fulton pointed out. "The 
City Judge honors their arrests 
just as quickly as he does those 



cf uniformed City Officers." 
SECURITY COSTS 

A salient question among cam- 
pus students is "what happens to 
the money gleaned from traffic 
tickets?" When posed this ques- 
tion, Fulton stated that the park- 
ing fines went to pay the opera- 
tional costs of the Campus Secu- 
rity. However, he explained, they 
do not begin to pay the total cost 
of $41,265 for operating the 
force for a year. At present 
some 1500 to 1800 tickets have 
been issued, thus bringing in 
"around $2000" in fines, stated 
the Dean. 




THE DILEMMA of the student 
driver increases daily as the cam- 
pus traffic regidations become 
more and more complicated. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 10, 1967 



Letter t The Editor 

Shaw Contrasts 
Schools Spirit 



Editor's Note: Last week before 
Paul Shaw was killed, he sub- 
mitted the following two letters 
to the Sauce for publication. 
These letters are exempliary of 
his love for the college as well as 
for his country. 
Dear Editor, 

As the 1959 LSU quarterback, 
Warren Rabb, finished the invo- 
cation, the loudspeaker sounded; 
"Now please remain standing for 
the National Anthem. . .Feel free 
to join in the singing." 

I wasn't sure I had heard right, 
but my doubts were soon abated 
as the Tiger band began playing 
and 67,000 football fans, no, 
67,000 Americans, joined in the 
singing. Never have I witnessed 
anything so wonderful!! Almost 
everyone was singing. Men with 
baritones and women with so- 
pranos and drunks with slurred 
chants. Before my eyes, backs 

Student Rights, 
Freedom of Press 
Upheld Nationally 

The American Association of 
University Professors has become 
the second of five national or- 
ganizations to go on record in 
favor of a joint statement on the 
rights and freedoms of students. 

The statement endorses such as 
rights as a student role n policy- 
making and due process for stu- 
dents n disciplinary cases. 

The National Student Associa- 
tion was the first of five organi- 
zations to endorse the statement. 
This action came at the NSA Con- 
gress in August. 

In addition to AAUP and NSA, 
the statement was drafted by rep- 
resentatives of the American As- 
sociation of Colleges, the Nation- 
al Association of Student Person- 
nel Administrators, and the Na- 
tioal Association of Women's 
Deans and Counselors. 

The statement is considered 
because the bodies which drafted 
it represent administrators, fa- 
culty members, and students. 

Robert Van Waes, associate sec- 
retary of AAUP, said the AAUP 
council was "very enthusiastic" 
about the principles of academic 
freedom for students. He termed 
the joint statement "a big step 
toward creating a national con- 
sensus on certain student rights 
and freedoms and a prelude to 
achieving a national consensus on 

(See Student Rights, page 4) 



were staightened just a little 
more, and chins jutted a little 
more proudly! Shoulders pulled 
back that last bit, and chill bumps 
dotted the skin of almost every- 
one within the sight of my van- 
tage point on the 50 yard line. 

Would you believe. . .the same 
thing at NSC? 
Sincerely, 
Paul Shaw 



Dear Editor, 

Two weeks ago, I saw 67,500 
disappointed LSU fans give a 
standing ovation as their de- 
feated Bengals left the gridiron. 

How did you, the loyal, spir- 
ited NSC Demon fans, react to- 
ward our heroes when they lost 
their first game. 

Paul Shaw 

More Comments 
On Femininity 

Editor: 

I would like to voice opinion 
and a conclusion for the recent 
"Current Sauce" articles on 
American Masculinity and Femi- 
ninity. 

First of all, a representative 
from one gender has not the au- 
thority to judge the other, and 
certainly not to speak in general 
terms about a classification that 
includes so few of that gender. 
This is degrading and therefore 
fruitless. 

The American male and the 
American female of today have 
no more exchanged places than 
compared to their status of a 
hundred years ago. A European 
looking at America finds men 
in possession of the affairs of 
government, and he categorizes 
the small percentage of women 
holding offices into the select 
group of outstanding but other- 
wise not influential females every 
century has produced. As for the 
European male being more chiv- 
alric than the American male, 
this is only an outward appear- 
ance. Maybe he is. But sex has 
few barriers in European culture, 
and its male is simply out for 
what he can get, any way he can 
get it, which is by what Ameri- 
can women call his "good man- 
ners." 

This newspaper debate can 
labled "The New Generation." 
In my opinion, the latter is only 
an invention of our time, and 
the former is invalid; the two 
sexes of America are, as they 
have been and always will be, in 
their respective roles. 

Marty Steiner, 

Sophomore, McNeese State 

Reporter, Lake Charles 

American Press 




STUpEKjTS^pfSjRK THEIR THOROUGHBREDS 
-J?AC£RS, AND WAR HORSES ON THE RIGHT/ 
AND FACULTV PARKS ITS ASSES, MULES, 
AND OX-CARTS ON THE LEFT: 

/-V 



INTRODUCING OXBRIDGE": Here's a new cartoon series about a 
college— one that operated a little before our time, but, all the same, 
bears a startling resemblance to the kind of school we all know and 
(well . . .) love. For example, does the Oxbridge security guard remind 
you of anyone you know ? 



Crews Fashion Unique 
Sets For 'Amphitryon' 



By Jim O'Quinn 

There they were — an enormous 
crew of scenery stage hands ham- 
mering this cloud. 

The Fine Arts stage was al- 
ready littered with half-finished 
platforms, bigger-than-life fake- 
marble facades, and all manner of 
machinery for moving the mam- 
moth sets. But, at the moment, 
the cloud was the thing — for this 
cloud was to be the seat of God- 
King Jupiter in the very opening 
scene of "Amphitryon 38," Jean 
Giraudoux's classical farce, sch- 
eduled Thursday and Friday as 
the second production of the Col- 
lege Theatre fall season. 
Suggestive Scenery 

Director Frank Magers, assist- 
ant professor of speech, was on- 
stage, supervising the draping of 
a gauzy white stuff over the big 
square platform on rollers. The 
cloud itself, he pointed out, is 
only one of five full-stage sets 
required for the sumptiously-de- 
signed production, which was first 
produced in New York in 1937 
with Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fon- 
tanne in the leads. 

Five or six blue-jeaned stage 
hands pushed the unfinished 
cloud into the wings, revealing a 
towering complex of one-dimen- 
sional columns, fastened together 
by angular levels and half-hidden 
braces. "The scenery is all non- 
realistic," Magers explained, 



It's What's Happening 



Friday, November 10 

Telephone Training Program, SU 320, 
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Saturday, November 11 

Football game — NSC vs Southwestern, 
McNaspey Stadium, Lafayette, 7:30 
p.m. 

Monday, November 13 

Southern Bell Training Program, SU 

316, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Purple Jacket Meeting, SU 314, 4:15 

p.m. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Pledging and In- 
itiation Meeting, Home Economics 
Living Room, 5:30 p.m. 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, 6 p.m. 
Tuesday, November 14 

Southern Bell Training Program, SU 
316, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Youth Concert, FA Auditoruim, 5:30 
p.m. 

Scuba Club Meeting, SU 321, 5:30 p.m. 
'JSC Chorale Banquet, SU Ballroom, 



7:30 p.m. 

Simon and Garfunkel Concert, Coli- 
seum, 8 p.m. 
Thursday, November 16 

Alpha Lambda Delta Meeting, SU 269- 

270, 5:30 p.m. 
Intercollegiate Enterprises Tutoring, 
SU 308, 313, 315, 6 to 10 p.m. 
Kappa Delta Pi Meeting, SU 320, 6:30 
p.m. 

SU Movie, "Shenandoah", Ballroom, 
7 p.m. 

Philosophy Club Meeting, SU 316, 7 
p.m. 

College Theater play, "Amphitryon 
38", FA Auditorium, 8 p.m. 
Friday, November 17 

Iota Lambda Initiation, SU 320-321, 
6 p.m. 

Iota Lambda Initiation, SU 269-270 

7:30 p.m. 
Delta Zeta Hayride, 7 p.m. 
College Theater play, "Amphitryon 
38", FA Auditorium, 8 p.m 



'suggestive of a Greek palace, or 
a city square, or what have you." 
Students Head Crews 

Magers serves both as director 
and technical supervisor for the 
show. Robert Cox, a junior speech 
and hearing therapy major from 
Cheneyville, is Mager's Stage 
Manager and the head of the 18- 
member scenery crew. 

"Costumes for the show are also 
a big job," Magers added. They're 
being done entirely by students — 
all new costumes, designed es- 
pecially for the production." Nan- 
cy Martin, a Lake Charles speech 
major with broad experience in 
both college and civic theatre, 
heads the costume crew. 

"Amphitryon 38," translated 
from Giraudoux's original French 
by S. N. Behrman, will be, Magers 
says, the "most unusual thing 
Northwestern has seen onstage for 
a long time." The cast, lead by 
Shreveport graduate student Dan- 
ny Gayer and Baton Rouge junior 
Suzy Hames, has been in rehear- 
sal for two weeks with basic sets 
and props in preparation for the 
show's two-night run. Curtain 
time is at 8 p.m. 

A Cloud For A God 

The scenery crew was moving 
another unit, this one draped in 
yards of heavy curtain. The sound 
crew experimented sporadically 
with what sounded like recorded 
lute music. Someone was recit- 
ing loudly in the hall. 

"I believe it'll be a very inte- 
resting show," Magers observed, 
"both visually and dramatically. 
The sets are especially fun." 

The sets are also extensive and 
complicated, and will probably be, 
by the time the curtain goes up 
Thursday, one of the best things 
about the show. Building a cloud 
to hold up a God should be 
enough to inspire any stage crew. 

Library Majors 
Tour Libraries 

Thirty-seven library science 
majors will tour six Shreveport 
libraries during a field trip Nov. 
15. 

The annual trip is sponsored 
by the local chapter of Alpha 
Beta Alpha, national undergrad- 
uate library science fraternity. 

Libraries to be visited are the 
new Captian Shreve High School 
Library, Barksdale Air Force 
Base Library, Veterans Adminis- 
tration Library Judson Elemen- 
tary School Library, Centenary 
College Library and the Art 
Museum Library. 



LSD Users Rare 

Few Collegians 
Now On Drugs, 
Reports Survey 

Reports of mass student in- 
volvement with the illicit drugs 
marijuana and LSD are wildly 
exaggerated, according to the 
Gallup Poll. 

Only about six percent of the 
nation's college students have 
ever tried marijuana and not 
more than one percent have ex- 
perimented with LSD, according 
to a survey of students in 426 
colleges by the noted pollster. 

The poll was taken by Dr. 
George Gallup's American In- 
stitute of Public Opinion for the 
Reader's Digest; results are pub- 
lished in the magazine's Nov- 
ember issue. 

For all the outcry about drugs 
on campus, a majority — fifty-one 
percent — of the students ques- 
tioned said that they did not even 
know a single student who had 
tried marijuana or LSD. And 
they estimated with reasonable 
accuracy that only about four 
percent of those on their own 
campus had tried drugs. 

However, when asked how 
many of their fellow collegians 
across the nation used drugs, the 
students interviewed jumped! 
their estimates to a very high 13 
percent. This higher guess for 
'outside' campuses could be a 
reflection of exaggerated news 
aoccunts about drug use on cam- 
pus, the Digest suggests. 

Projected to the nation's six 
million college students, the Gal- 
lup figures indicate some 300,000 
drug users — a sharp contrast to 
the reported 'millions.' Moreover, 
the percentage applies only to 
those who have tried drugs. It is 
likely that a far smaller group 
are regular users. 

Accompanying the poll is an 
article exploding some of the 
myths about 'mind-expanding' 
drugs such as LSD. Author Dr. 
Donald Louria, an associate prof- 
essor at Cornell University Med- 
ical College and president of the 
New York State Council on Drug 
Addiction, says there is no ev- 
idence to support claims that 
LSD increases creativity. More 
likely the opposite is true, he 
states. 

He notes for example that in 
one study a group of accomp- 
lished pianists played under 
LSD's influence Although each 
thought he played superbly, all 
reacted with distaste when the 
recording was played back after 
the LSD had worn off. 

As to the claim made by Dr. 
Timothy Leary and others that 
LSD is an aphrodisiac, Dr. Louria 
says that it is 'totally spurious.' 

'While an LSD hallucinatiion 
may have highly erotic content, 
he writes, 'the drug is, if any- 
thing, an anti-aphrodisiac' 

Against this background, it is 
encouraging that the students 
questioned in the Gallup Poll 
were not only reluctant to try 
drugs themselves, but felt that 
those who were 'on' marijuana 
or LSD were 'lost, mixed up, 
sick.' Far from being the 'in' 
group, those who take drugs are 
seen by their fellows as victims 
rather than heroes. 

ftOurrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. PubUshed weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State CoUege of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 

Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson Staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann. Danny Boutwell, Gail Dooley, 
Ray King, Gidget Maxwell, Jack Mont- 
gomery, Garland Riddle Shirley Rut- 
ledge, Alton Sanders, Ed Thompson, 
Thomas Turner and Virginia Ann Wo- 
oten. 



Friday, November 10, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 





1# 




?K1 'w\o9< 





If your major 
is listed here, 
IBM would like 
to talk with you 
November 15th 




Sign up for an interview at your placement office— even 
if you're headed for graduate school or military service. 

Why is IBM interested in so many different people? 

The basic reason is growth. Information processing is 
the fastest growing, fastest changing major industry in the 
world. IBM products are being used to solve problems in 
government, business, law, education, medicine, science, the 
humanities— just about any area you can name. We need peo- 
ple with almost every kind of background to help our custom- 
ers solve their problems. That's why we'd like to talk with you. 

What you can do at IBM 

Whatever your major, you can do a lot of good things at 
IBM. Change the world (maybe). Make money (certainly). 



Continue your education (through any of several plans, in- 
cluding a Tuition Refund Program). And have a wide choice 
of places to work (we have over 300 locations throughout 
the United States). 

What to do next 

We'll be on campus to interview for careers in Market- 
ing, Computer Applications, Programming, Research, Design 
and Development, Manufacturing, and Finance and Admin- 
istration. If you can't make a campus interview, send an out- 
line of your interests and educational background to Mr. C. F. 
Cammack, IBM Corporation, 1447 Peach- 
tree St. , N.E. , Rm. 810, Atlanta, Ga. 30309. 
We're an equal opportunity employer. 



rage « 



tHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 10, 1967 



Minutes of SGA 



SGA MINUTES 
November 6, 

President Newbury called the meet- 
ing to order. Absent was Brown. Late 
was Ferrera. Minutes were read and 
corrected. 

Rispoli reported that the travel board 
project has been turned over to Oliver 
Finishing Co.; that the Current Sauce 
needs a larger staff and might get 
this by giving more scholarships; that 
the committee has tried to place tele- 
phones in the Student Union; however 
Dean Fulton said that they had been 
removed because students had charged 
long distance phone calls to them; 
that the problem with the laundry 
has been looked into and letters have 
been sent to various state schools to 
find out how they handle their laun- 
dry situation; that the I.D. discount 
cards have been looked into by the 
Circle K club; and that the music in 
the cafeteria is hoped to be better 
in the future. 

Germany reported that the school 
spirit committee hoped to continue its 
work. After a discussion^ Maxwell 
moved that the SGA pay one-fourth 
of the bus fare if enough students 
sign up to go to USL this coming week- 
end. The group decided that tickets 
would go on sale in Mrs. Scroggin's 
office at noon on Tuesday. Germany 
stated he felt that the revolving school 
spirit trophies should be changed to 
non-revolving trophies. After a brief 
discussion, Maxwell moved that the 
school spirit trophies be made non- 
revolving. Ferrera seconded. Butler 



called for question. Motion carried. 

Maxwell presented each SGA member 
with a copy of the budget of the year. 
Maxwell moved that the budget be 
tabled for consideration and judge- 
ment until next SGA meeting. Seconded 
by Townsend. Ferrera called for ques- 
tion. Motion passed. 

Maxwell gave a brief report on the 
Dean's Conference. He challenged 
each SGA member to be a better leader 
and to perform his duties as expected. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

President Newbury said that flowers 
will be sent to Paul Shaw's funeral 
in the name of the SGA. Dean Fulton 
announced that he will be taking a 
car and said that students could ride 
with him if they wished. 

Ramsey asked about the Student Di- 
rectories and when they will be out. 
Dean Fulton stated that the delivery 
date was Ocober 15; however they 
were expecting deliveries at any time. 

The student forum was discussed by 
Charles Skinner. The speech forum 
would deal with problems confront- 
ing students on campus. One of the 
first forums will be titled "The Cur- 
rent Sauce is Not and Should Be the 
Voice of the Students.' This is to be 
set up by the speech department and 
headed by Mr. Schexnider. 

Butler moved that the meeting be 
adjourned. Seconded by Townsend. Mo- 
tion carried. Meeting adjourned. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Jan Warren. Secretary of SGA 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 
Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



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WHAT'S YOUR READING 
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THIS FALL: 





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EACH WITH 85% OR MORE COMPREHENSION 

THESE STUDENTS GRADUATED IN 
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AT THE SHREVEPORT YMCA 

Students throughout the nation have achieved spectacular results 
through the training received from OPTIMATION Speed Reading. 
Put those lazy brain cells to work and be ready for the school year 
You can complete OPTIMATION Speed Reading before Christmas 
Visit a free pre-enrollment class Optimation GUARANTEES you 
will read comprehensively 1,000 words per minute upon comple- 
tion of the twelve two-hour sessions or your money will be refund- 
ed Compare 1,000 words per minute with your present speed. Up 
to this sentence, thjs ad contained 94 words How long did it take 
you to read it, and how much of it do you remember? There's your 
answer, students, adults p,-fessional people teachers 

FREE INITIAL CLASSES 
Natchitoches High School 

W, Nov. 7 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 
sday, Nov. 8 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 
ay, Nov. 13 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 
Thursday, Nov. 16 — 5:45 p.m. & 8 p.m. 

For Information call 352-2303 between 8:30 a.m. & 4:30 p.m. 
Sponsored by the NATCHITOCHES JAYCEES 



Tests? Well 
You Know, 

(Editor's Note: This feature 
story was adapted from a very 
perceptive article in the North - 
east 'Pow Wow' by satirist Bonnie 
McCullin.) 

This column is for freshmen 
only. This doesn't mean that you 
upperclassmen can't read it — it 
only means you probably won't 
benefit from it, since you are al- 
ready familar with its contents. 

The subject is tests — particu- 
larly mid-semester tests, since 
they are all about us this week. 

Tests in college, freshmen, are 
very different from those you had 
in high school. High school tests 
were given to you for two pur- 
poses: (1) To measure the a- 
mount of knowledge you have 
gained, and (2) to prove the ed- 
ucation textbooks were wrong. 

The most popular type of test 
in college is multiple choice. 
There are two reasons for its pop- 
ularity: (1) Experts have proven 
that a test of this type most ac- 
curately measures a student's a- 
bility to accurately retain im- 
portant information, and (2) 
they are easy to grade. 

Now you probably had mult- 
ple choice tests in high school, 
and a typical question was prob- 
ably something like this: 

The largest bee in a beehive 
is called: 

(A) Queen 

(B) King 

(C) Jack 

(D) Ace 

But in college the typical mult- 
iple choice question would be 
something like this: 

Which of these statements 
most accurately describes the ad- 
ministration of Franklin D. Roose 
velt: 

(A) In many Ways it could be 
called successful if viewed 
objectively, but in other 
ways it could be called a 
failure, depending on how 
you look at it. 

(B) It proved that the Amer- 
ican people were, on the 
whole, able to adjust to a 
changing situation, but that 
they were also unable to 
comprehend the economic 
fluctuations around them. 

(C) It was a success as far as 
regards William F. Buckley 
Jr. because it gave him a 
lifetime of material to gripe 
about. 



They're Kind Of. 
Like It All Depends..! 



(D) It was a failure as 
far as regards Arthur Schles- 
inger Jr. because it gave him 
material for a literary proj- 
ect that he will never be able 
to finish. 

(E) A and B above. 

(F) C and D above. 

(G) All of the above. 

(H) None of the above. 

(I) Quite a few of the above. 
(J) No telling how many of the 

above. 

(K) The question is irrelevant 
because there never was 
a Roosevelt administration. 
There was only a Roosevelt. 

You will notice that there are 
12 possible answers, the same 
number as there are numbers on 
a clock face. So you simply look 
at your watch and see which 
number the hand is on and mark 
the corresponding answer. 

The other type of test is called 
the essay exam. Its purpose is to 
provide the student with an op- 
portunity to broadly present his 
knowledge. A typical question 
on a fresman test might be: 

Discuss Western Civilization 



from the origin of the universe 
to the year 1984. 

The important thing to remem- 
ber here is to be specific. So 
your answer should go like this: 

'The general concensus of mod- 
ern historical opinion is that 
the world did begin, and may 
reasonably be expected to con- 
tinue until 1984. But the 
events which occured in the 
intervening period have caused 
some slight difference in opin- 
ion among scholars. 
The major disagreements may 
be said to be concerned mainly 
with the occurrence of the 
events themselves, and with the 
influence of given events upon 
succeeding events. We may sum 
up by saying that either some- 
thing happened or it did not 

happen, but a general agree- 
ment has yet been reached." 

And there is the whole thing 
in a nutshell. The honor roll 
should stretch a mile this sem- 
ester. 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




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Home of the 
Keepsake Diamond Rings 

Watchmaking & Engraving 
a Specialty 



Rights 



582 Front Street 



Phone 352-3166 



Student 

(Continued from page 2) 

the student role in institutional 
government." 

Some of the major provisions 
of the statement include: 

A long list of due process re- 
quirements in major cases, includ- 
ing putting the burden of proof 
on the college and guaranteeing 
the student's right to defend him- 
self. 

The right to attend college 
without regard to race, to invite 
speakers of students' own cho- 
osing, and to have complete fre- 
edom of off-campus action with- 
out fear of university punish- 
ment for the violation of civil 
laws. 

Protection of students from 
"arbitrary and prejuldiced grad- 
ing by professors. 

A free student press. When- 
ever possible, the statement says, 
student newspapers should be 
legally and financially autonom- 
ous form the university as a sep- 
arate cooroation. When this is 
not posible, the statement urges 
a student press sufficiently auto- 
nomous to remain a vehicle for 
freedom of inquiry and expres- 
sion. 



Friday, November 10, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Hendrick Accepts 

Panhellenic Receives 
Colonization Award 



Page 



The Panhellenc Council of 
Northwestern has received a 
citation for furthering the 
growth of the sorority system 
by allowing a colony of a na- 
tional sorority to be formed 
on our campus. 

Announcement of the award 
was made at the National Pan- 
hellenic Conference held in New 
Orleans last week. The citation 
was one of 77 given at the con- 
clave. Only two other Louisiana 
colleges received similar awards. 

Accepting the award was Dean 
of Women Lucile Hendrick, local 
Panhellenic advisor. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

Two more men have been added 
to the rolls of Kappa Alpha's fall 
pledge class. They are Randall 
Johnson and Bob Maloney. 

In addition to increasing its 
pledge membership, the actives 
have been formulating plans for 
an alumni weekend to be held 
in the near future. 



Alumni spearheading the drive 
for better alumni-undergraduate 
relations are John Edgar and Joe 
Traigle of Shreveport. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Capturing first place in the 
IFC division of intramural foot- 
ball was Sigma Tau Gamma. 

Sigma Tau is also making plans 
to have a car brigade to the USL 
game at Lafayette tomorrow. 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Mrs. Charles Shuette, Sigma 
Kappa province president of 
Shreveport, visited the local 
chapter Tuesday. Prior to the reg- 
ular meeting of the sorority, Mrs. 
Shuette met briefly with chapter 
officers. 

Additions to the fall pledge 
class include Janet Churchman 
and Gina Guidroz, bringing the 
total pledge class to 27. 

To join the circle of actives on 
November 16 are Margaret At- 
chison, Connie Jones, Lynn Man- 
dino and Barbara Slack. 




THE OTHER NINE, winners of the college's Intramural Football league competition, pose for this shot 
after besting six other teams in the intramural playoffs. Leading the team to intramural victory were 
(left to right) Jerry Kemp, Mike Herron, Whit Creech, Woody Wooddruff, Tom Kelly, Ron Walker 
Jack Lewis, Steve Miller and Glenn Sapp. ' 



Area Youth. Concerts Scheduled 
Next Week By College Symphony 



Winnfield's Woman Mayor Addresses 
AWS' Greater Council Monday Night 



Winnfield's woman mayor, Mrs. 
Mary Allen, was guest speaker 
Monday night at the monthly 
AWS Greater Council meeting. 

Mayor Allen, speaking on wo- 
men and politics, encouraged the 
women members of the AWS to 
serve in some capacity during 
their lives. She also stressed the 
extreme need for women leaders 
in government today. 

A brief business session was 

Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

One school board representa- 
tive, two industrial firms, and a 
Naval representative will inter- 
view students next week in the 
college placement office, SU 
room 223. 

All day Tuesday, a Jefferson 
Davis Parish School Board repre- 
sentative will see seniors inter- 
ested in teaching in the south- 
west Louisiana area. 

Also on Tuesday, accounting 
majors will have an opportunity 
to discuss employment possibi- 
lities with a representative of 
the Murphy Oil corporation. 

An IBM Co. representative is 
scheduled to interview math ma- 
jors on Wednesday. 

On Friday, a representative of 
the Naval Ordinance Station in 
Indian Head, Maryland, will in- 
terview electronic, chemistry, 
and physics majors. 

Anyone wishing to schedule 
an interview, should contact the 
placement office, phone 257- 
5621 or 357-5622. 

Turkey Shoot Set 
By Demeter Club 

If you're a crack shot and want 
a turkey, shoot Thursday and try 
for one of ten turkeys to be given 
top winners in the contest. 

A gun and shells will be furn- 
!shed for the contestants in the 
shot contest at Chaplain's Lake 
in front of the College's dairy 
barn from 12 noon to 5:30 p.m. 

Tickets will be on sale in the 
Student Union Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday and Thursday. By pur- 
chasing a $.50 ticket, a contest- 
ed will have one shot; for $1.00, 
three shots; and for $5.00, fifteen. 

Five toms and five hens will be 
awaided the top ten winners, 
according to Demeter officials. 



conducted prededing Mayor Al- 
len's speech. During the busi- 
ness meeting, the dormitory of- 
ficers, house directors and ex- 
ecutive officers were briefed on 
their duties for the upcoming 
Christmas-at-Home festivity. 

Also during the meeting award 
ribbons were presented to the 
various dormitories for their 
winning bulletin board displays. 
Winners for October were Louisi- 
ana Hall, first; A, B, C, and D 
wings of Sabine, second; and 
Varnado, third. For November, 
Louisiana Hall was again first; 
Audubon, second; and Agnes 
Morris, third. 

Before concluding the business 
session, the AWS president 
Daphana Smith thanked all stu- 
dents who had helped in creating 
the AWS and AMS Homecoming 
display. 

Radio Auction 

A radio auction will be con- 
ducted at 7 p.m. Tuesday on 
KNOC radio. Items will be con- 
tributed by local merchants and 
the proceeds will be used by the 
Service League to clothe needy 
children at Christmas. Any KNOC 
listener can participate. 



The Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Symphony Orchestra will open 
its 1967-68 season with the pres 
entation of three Youth Concerts 
in Natchitoches and Red River 
Parishes on Tuesday. 

The Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Joseph B. Carlucci, 
head of the Music Department, 
will present its first concert at 
8:40 a.m. in the auditorium of the 
new St. Mary's School in East 
Natchitoches. Sister Ida Marie, 
principal of St. Mary's, reports 
that a number of students from 
East Natchitoches Junior High 
School and M. R. Weaver Elemen- 
tary School have been invited to 
attend this concert. 

Following the forty-minute pro 
gram in East Natchitoches, the 
Orchestra will travel by bus and 
truck to Coushatta for a second 
concert in the high school aud- 
itorium at 10:45 a.m. Attending 
will be elementary and high 
school students from Coushatta, 
Hall Summit, and other schools 
in Red River Parish. At the con- 
clusion of this second concert 
the orchestra will return to Nat- 
chitoches for a third and final 
program in the NSC Fine Arts 
Auditorium at 1:30 p. m. This 
will be for students from North- 
western Elementary and Junior 
High Schools, and from Parks 
Eelmentary school. 

The program includes the fol- 
lowing selections: Overture to 
the opera "Orpheus in the Under- 
world" by Offenbach; "Come 
Sweet Death," a sacred song by 
J. S. Bach; Waltz from the ballet 
"The Sleeping Beauty" by Tschai- 
kowsky; Marche Slave also by 
Tschaikowsky; "The Synopated 
Clock," a novelty by Leroy Ander- 
son. Comments will be given by 
the conductor concerning each 
selection played The instruments 



YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE AT UNITED $ STORE 




of the orchestra will be demon- 
strated and the concert will con- 
clude with the playing and sing- 
ing of the Star Spangled Banner. 

These concerts are given for 
our young people without charge 



and are sponsored by the Nat- 
chitoches-Northwestern Sympho- 
ny Society. The public is invited 
to attend the 1:30 performance 
in the Fine Arts Auditorium. 



Move Up The Right Way 

Valuable people move up with North American. Just ask their 
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finish. It means neatness forever, 
ironing never. These Hondo® 
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Oxford b.d. shirt in strong colors. 
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Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 10, 1967 



Demon Cagers Begin 
Season Preparations 



The actual date of the initial 
Demon basketball game is still 
approximately a month away, 
and with this in mind, coach 
Tynes Hildebrand and his assist- 
ants have begun engaging in 
vigorous practices and intense 
pre-seasonal preparations on the 
Coliseum. 

Assisted by Don Beasley and 
former scoring star David Clark, 
Hildebrand has been putting the 
Demons through the paces by 
stressing the basic fundamentals 
of the game, and normal ball 
handling techniques. 

Highlighting the three weeks 
of practice have been a game 
situation scrimmage with South- 
ern State last Monday night. This 
week the Demons will engage in 
another practice game on the 
Coliseum floor at 7:30. 

Beginning his third year as 
head mentor, Hildebrand will 
have eight of 12 returning letter- 
men back from last winter, and 
has stated that the team possess- 
es one of the best freshmen 
teams ever. 

Last year the Demons finished 
with an 8-17 overall record while 
tying for fourth place in the con- 
ference standings with a 5-7 slate 

Earlier this month, Hildebrand 
stated that the team should be 
vastly improved over the squad 
of last year. The Demon mentor 
acknowledged that this was due 
to the experience gained by the 
young team of last yeaar. 



Leading the list of returnees 
is all-GSC James Wyatt who scor- 
ed 17 points a game last year and 
set a school rebounding record 
with 316 grabs. 

Other lettermen are James 
Peffer, Wayne Lee, Dougie Watts 
Bob Willett, Skeeter Henry, 
Peter Gray, and Odis Faaust. 

Freshmen singled out by Hilde- 
brand for possible action this 
winter are David Pipes of Col- 
lingsworth, and Johnny Janese of 
LaGrange in Lake Charles. 

Hildebrand is faced with the 
monumental task of molding the 
Demon squad into title contend- 
ers in a conference that is re- 
garded by many as the toughest 
in the south. 

The Demons have only two 
bonafide starters back from last 
years squad with no seniors on 
the team. 

The opening season encounter 
will take place in Statesbaro, Ga. 
when the Demons travel to meet 
Georgia Southern. 

Announcements 

Members of the AMS will meet 
Tuesday night at 7 o'clock in 
the SGA Conference room for 
their regular meeting. 

The college's AMS council 
meets every first and third Tues- 




JIMMY WOODS (left), and RONNIE WHATLEY (right), will anchor the defensive line when the Demons 
travel to the bayou country of South La. in a contest with the Rajun Cajuns' of USL. Woods is a senior 
tackle from Minden, while Whatley is a junior linebacker from El Dorado, Ark. 

Faltering Demons Face USL 
In Crucial GSC Contest 



All students enrolled in the 
second half of Social Studies 
450 are reminded that the class 
sessions are scheduled to begin 
Nov. 13. 



After watching a 15 game 
winning streak disppear at the 
hands of Troy, and a second pos- 
sible GSC championship swept 
away by McNeese, the Demons 
will attempt to forge their way 
into the win column and regain 



their early season form when 
they travel to Lafayette tomor- 
row night to meet the USL Bull- 



An inense battle should occur 
at McNaspy Stadium tomorrow 
night since both teams are pre- 
sently deadlocked for second 



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place in the conference standing 
with identical 2-1 records behind 
league-leading McNeese. 

The Bulldogs will also be out 
to avenge their 21-8 setback last 
year at the hands of the Demons 
in Natchitoches. 

Southwestern enters the con- 
test sporting a 5-3 record with 
victories over Louisiana College, 
Pensacola Navy, La. Tech, South- 
eastern and powerful Arkansas 
State. 

The three losses incurred by 
such formidable opponents as 
the Ragin' Cajuns have been to 
Lamar Tech, Memphis State and 
Northeast. 

According to head football 
coach Glenn Gossett, many Bull- 
dog players have been plagued 
by injuries throughout the sea- 
son, but all should be ready to 
see action tomorrow night. 

In the Memphis State contest, 
eight players were sidelined with 
leading ground gainer Jim Bar- 
ton among them. 

Barton, who operates at the 
tailback position, has broken 
through enemy lines for a total of 
384 yards for a 3.4 average. 

Next in this department is Ad- 
rian Mentel of New Orleans who 
has netted 223 for a 3.2 norm. 

Rushing yardage seems to be 
the Ragin' Cajuns biggest asset, 
as they have overcome their op- 
ponents for a total of 1,136 yards 
in 504 attempts. 

The USL passing attack is led 
by quarterback Mickey Bergeron 
who has completed 26 of his 57 
passes for 347 yards. 

Bergeron's favorite targets 
have been Mentel who has snag- 
ged eight passes for 48 yards, 
and split end Kent Finley who 
has caught five for 105 yards. 

The powerful Purple and White 
running game which has been 
halted by opponents in the past 
two weeks, will have to live up 
to its early season laurels if ths 
Demons hope to overcome the 
staunch Bulldogs' defense. 

Prior to last week's game, the 
Cajuns were ranked second in 
the conference standings with 
eight starters returning from 
last year's squad. 

To secure their sixth victory 
of the season, the Demon offense 
will have to make a superior ef- 
fort in order to provide the mar- 
gin of victory. 

Game situations may force the 
offensive coaches to abandon 
their normal ball control offense, 
and require Decon Lewis and 
Don Guidry to 1 mber their throw- 
ing arms and riddle the enemy 
defense with aerials. 



Friday, November 10, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page H 



From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 



A Lesson In Eating Crow 

The Current Sauce sports department, in its never-ending 
efforts to create new vistas in sports coverage, got a chance 
to gain a valuable lesson in kicking dynamics Tuesday after- 
noon on the Demon practice field by "putting its foot where 
its mouth was." 

This unusual situation came about following an inter- 
view with football coach Glenn Gossett. The head mentor 
offered to permit a few members of the sports staff to come 
out and have a go at place-kicking in order to find out what 
was involved in this art which FDU had picked at from time 
to time. Two of us, Jack Montgomery and I, had been place- 
kickers in high school, so we already had a fairly good idea, 
and the third, Jack Hoffstadt, had a reputation for doing 
anything at all if he wanted to. However, we declined the 
gracious offer. 

A few hours later though, our faculty advisor, Jerry 
Pierce, found out about this and decided to extend his own 
challenge. He rather arrogantly said that if I dared, he'd 
take me on in a kicking duel, and further, that he would 
bet that I couldn't make 70 per cent of my kicks from 20 
yards out. Well, what does a college sophomore do when 
challenged by the school's publicity director?" He accepts. 
So, ground rules were set down for the showdown. Each of 
us would kick ten placements from 20 yards. In the event 
of a tie, arrangements would be made and the eventual 
loser would suffer indignation in FDU. 

At 4:30 p.m. my two cohorts (Hoffstadt and Montgomery) 
and I began warming up. All of us were connecting, and we 
settled back, ready to collectively take on the world in kick- 
ing. . . 

Our adversary arrived at 5 p.m., a borrowed kicking 
tee in hand, dressed rather inappropriately for the mission 
so we thought. There he was, in suit and tie with a pair 
of wingtips on instead of cleats, or at least a pair of tennis 
shoes. The other three of us were attired in varying degrees 
of comfort in order to expend our maximum effort. So we 
were ready, Mr. Pierce in his suit, and me in my racked-out 
football jersey (for luck), worn-out trousers and tennis shoes. 
Mr. Pierce didn't want any warm-ups (we'd been kicking 
half-an-hour). Jack Hoffstadt teed-up the ball, Coach Gossett 
wandered over and the fun began. 

"Ha, Ha, You Missed Keppel!" 

Hoffstadt's first effort was perfect, Montgomery's was 
wide, Pierce's sneaked over and mine was feeble. Oh well, 
nine more to go I figured. 

Rather than get into a kick by kick account, we will 
move on to what proved to be the turning point of the hotly 
contested affair de farce. 

It should be pointed out that Jerry Pierce is a master 
of pschological warfare, as he relentlessly chided away at 
any and all of my miscues with masochistic fervor. Endlessly 
he reminded all casual observers that I was the one that he 
had to beat. He constantly referred to me as "kep-PEL" (as 
in "PELICAN") rather than the proper pronounciation, 
which should sound more like "KEP-pul." His loudest guf- 
faws came when I blew my chance to make 70 per cent on my 
fifth kick. 

Now it was the tenth go-round. Hoffstadt (who kicks 
bare-footed) had not missed, and was therefore nine for nine. 
Montgomery (who also kicks shoeless)) was five for nine, as 
was Pierce and myself. Hoffstadt's was true again; Mont- 
gomery looped a perfect shot to finish 100 per cent and 60 
per cent respectively. It was now up to the two "mouths." 

Pierce leveled a line drive that just went under the cross- 
bar and stayed at 50 per cent. I had my chance! Now all I 
had to do was get one through and I would have partially won 
the bet and shut the misguided faculty member up for good. 
Anyone could do that, right? So I teed-up the ball amidst the 
ever intensifying heckling. I was becoming unnerved, but 
I could do it anyway— so I thought. I hit the ball solidly and 
thought that it was going to be good — until it curved and hit 
hit the upright. Disaster! We were tied. 

Kick-down Proves Fatal 

In this emergency, we decided that a best of three "kick 
down" would suffice. I went first, and in turn kicked three 
straight, but so did Pierce. I got my fourth and it became a 
first miss proposition. I didn't get the fifth. One could readi- 
!y see the greedy twinkle in the publicity director's eyes as 
he teed-up the ball that sealed my fate. It was perfect, and 
(See From Down Under, page 8) 



Billid 

House of Beauty 

Ask one of our 5 operators how to register for the falls 
and wiglets to be given FREE on Christmas week. 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 



McNeese Surges Into GSC Lead 
With Victory In Demon Stadium 



A determined and powerful 
group of McNeese Cowboys rolled 
into Demon Stadium Saturday 
night handed the Purple and 
White a convincing 21-7 setback 
before a sparse, chilly crowd to 
take over the undisputed lead in 
their quest for the Gulf States 
Conference crown. 

Obviously out to avenge their 
14-6 loss to the Demons last 
year in Lake Charles, the Cow- 
boys utilized a large, sure-tackl- 
ing defensive line and crushing 
ground game to overcome the 
surges of the faltering Demons. 

Although coming out on the 
short end of the score, the De-, 
mons faired well in the statistics 
charging over the turf for 133 
yards to the Cowboys' 180, and 
outpassing the visitors 133 to 76. 

The Demons suffered their 
second defeat in a row to bring 
their season mark to 5-2, and 
marked the their first loss in 
GSC competition since USL beat 
them in Lafayete 41-7 in 1965. 

Saturday night's loss puts the 
Demons in a deadlock with the 
Ragin' Cajuns for second place 
in the GSC standings, with that 
question being settled in Lafay- 
ette's McNaspy Stadium tomor- 
row night. 

The Cowboys seemed to move 
the ball at will through the De- 
mon defense as they drove 83 
yards to paydirt the first time 
they had their hands on the ball. 

Felix Simon, a 189 pound full- 
back playing for injured first 
stringer Carol Breaux, opened 
the series with a 37 yard burst 
up the middle of the field to put 
the ball on the Demon 40. 

Quarterback Dave Bougeois of 
Houma led the way completing 
two passes to the nine, Simon 
charged up the middle three 
straight times to put the ball on 
the one. 



On a second down situation 
Simon plunged through the cen- 
ter of the Demon forward wall 
and landed in the end zone for 
the tally. 

Kicking specialist C.J. Moore 
booted the extra point to put 
the Cowboys ahead 7-0 with 6:35 
left in the first quarter. 

After an exchange of punts, 
the Demons began what proved 
be only scoring drive of the 
night. 

Halfback Vic Nyvall, the team's 
leading rusher, carried the pig- 
skin five straight times from the 
Cowboy 46. With the ball resting 
on the 13, Kenny Callens drove 
through the congested line for 
four more. Don Guidry ran a- 
round left end for eight yards, 
with Nyvall carrying from the 
one for the score on the next 
play of the game and promptly 
kicked the PAT to tie the score 
at 7-7 with 11:54 left in the 
second quarter. 

McNeese's Larry Whatley ga- 
thered Phillip Creel's ensuing 
kickoff on the Cowboy nine and 
returned it 91 yards for the se-, 
cond Cowboy score. Whatley 
followed a host of Cowboy 
blockers up the middle of the 
field, then found a small opening 
in the wall and with a burst of 
speed was suddenly alone in the 
clear. The only stumbling block 
in Whatley's path was safety Da- 
vid Smith at the Demon 40. A 
hip fake by Whatley shook the 
defender off, and the Cowboy 
back entered the end zone un- 
touched. 

Moore came in again to boot 
the ball through the uprights, 
and gave the Cowboys a 14-7 
lead at halftime. 

The Cowboys' final tally of the 
night came midway in the third 
quarter when linebacker George 



Bougeois alertly pounced on a 
loose ball at the Demon 27. 

The McNeese eleven drove to 
paydirt in just seven plays in a 
series that was spearheaded by 
the completions of quarterback 
Bougeois. 

On third down at the Demon 
seven. Bourgeois rolled to his left 
and hit end Glenn Kidder for, 
six points. 

Late in the fourth quarter the 
Demons made a valiant effort to 
put 14 ponits on the* scoreboard. 
With Malcolm Lewis at the helm, 
the Demons drove to the Cow- 
boy 24 only to have their rally 
thwarted by a timely intercep- 
tion by Al Hebert. 

The Demons will try to re- 
cover from their sudden tailspin 
tomorrow night when they pay 
a visit to Lafayette to meet the 
Bulldogs of USL. 

Basketball Heads 
Intramural Scene 

A record breaking number of 
teams tipped-off the Intramural 
basketball season Wednesday 
night with 43 teams entered in 
competition throughout the win- 
ter months. 

Teams from various fraterni- 
ties, campus organizations, and 
individual teams will vie for the 
first place trophy. 

Intramural golf will be held on 
three different days beginning 
on Nov. 20. The tournament will 
also be held on Nov. 27 and Dec. 
4. Entry fee for the 27 hole tour- 
ney to be held at the Natchit- 
oches Country Club is set at $3. 

Deadline and a meeting for the 
entrants will take place in Room 
1 of the Men's Gym. All score 
cards must be turned into the 
Intramural director Roy Gentry. 



Guess 

who forgot 
his NoDoz 




As Gulliver discovered, falling asleep at the wrong time can be downright embarrassing, 
even for a Big Man on Campus. Ah, well, it can happen to the best of us. Your eyelids 
droop. Your attention wanders. You're drowsy all over. Quick! Take a couple of NoDoz. 
NoDoz really works to help you stay alert. Keep some handy, in your 
pocket, your medicine chest, the glove compartment of your car. 
NoDoz. It's non habit-forming. Take NoDoz. Show 'em they can't . 
keep a good man down. 

THE ONE TO TAKE WHEN YOU HAVE TO STAY ALERT. 




Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUGE 



Friday, November 10, 1967 




Computer Placement Open To 
Students As 'Key' To Employment 



Computerized placement for col- 
lege graduates is now possible 
on campus with the initiation of 
the SCAN computer placement 
program by the placement office, 
according to Harold Haile, place- 
ment director. 

The SCAN System, employed 
by some 350 colleges and univer- 
sities, enables employers to re- 
view a student's basic qualifica- 
tions through the use of a com- 
puter. SCAN also gives the sen- 
ior some assurance that his or her 
qualifications have been given 
full exposure to employers offer- 
ing an ever-widening range of 
career opportunities. 

Already approximately 165 na- 
tionally-known companies are 
using SCAN reports as guides in 
the selection and interviewing of 
prospective employees. 

If a senior participates, SCAN 
will enable employers to make 
known to the student their inter- 
est in his particular qualifica- 
tions, acquaint him with the range 
of their opportunities, and invite 
him to sign up for an interview 



with their recruiters visiting the 
college placement office. 

If a senior is interested in a 
specific employer and does not 
receive notification of its interest 
through the SCAN system, he is 
still able to sign up for interviews 
with the company representative. 
Conversely, should he receive an 
invitation which does not inter- 
est him, he is not obliged to reply 
or to sign up for an interview. 

The SCAN System question- 
naire is simple to answer and 
deals only with basic information 
such as name, degree, field, class 
standing, work experience, geo- 
graphic preference and occupa- 
tional interest. 

This basic information is 
enough to enable employers to 
develop an interest in the senior 
and prospective employee. At the 
time of the interview, the senior 
will be able to provide more com- 
plete details. 

All college seniors interested 
in the SCAN system are urged to 
visit the Placement Office in the 
Student Union for further infor- 



A LA PEANUTS? Jerry Pierce, Director of News Services, swings 
his foot into the ball as illustrious co-sports editor Jay Keppel sneers 
slyly as he pulls a "Lucy" by lifting the pigskin off the ground. 
Keppel, the hard-line critic, learned a lesson in the kicking duel. See 
FDU, page 7. 

From Down Under— 

(Continued from page 7) 

for practical purposes, you'd have thought that he had just 
kicked a goal that had won a close game 

The ex-Current Sauce staffer in his college days (way 
back when) turned place-kicker, raced across the field loud- 
ly proclaiming his triumph, while I the vanquished, stood 
around rather numbed. 

Then the publicist and Coach Gossett laughed awhile at 
an "old man" (not really), beating a college student. A kid! 
How they laughed and laughed and laughed etc. 

It wasn't a day for rejoicing, unless you were Jerry 
Pierce, but the "old man" offered to try again in a few weeks, 
"to give you another chance — 'kep-PEL' — ha ha ha ha — etc.!" 
Guest Picker is Wes T. Bank 

We've got another picker this weeK, a fellow New Or- 
leanian who is known as "Leach", though he prefers Wes T. 
Bank. This is how he sees it all this week around Louisiana. 
NSC 21, USL 19 
McNeese 36, SLU 30 
La. Tech 14, Lamar Tech 7 
NLSC 30, Delta State 6 
Tennessee 28, Tulane 14 
Alabama 36, LSU 14 
Dallas 27, New Orleans 21 

Editor's note: 

A Sauce sports survey revealed that 64 per cent of the 
students and faculty interviewed, predicted a USL win this 
week. The average was 14.5-13. 




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Shop our entire line of items. 

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The Jewlers with 
the DEMON Touch 



117 St. Denis 



Phone 352-6390 



IA Group Plans 
Christmas Booth 

Plans for the construction of 
a booth at the city's annual 
Christmas festival were discussed 
last Tuesday during the monthly 
meeting of the Industrial Arts 
Club. 

Membership is still open in the 
organization for any majors or 
minors in industrial arts, indus- 
trial technology and industrial 
arts education. Dr. Bill W. Shaw 
is the group's faculty advisor. 

BRIDGE OR CHESS, ANYONE?? 
If you're interested in playing 
contract bridge or chess, please 
contact the Student Union Pro- 
gram Director or Assistant Pro- 
gram Director in SU Room 233. 

STAMP IT! 

irS THE RAOI 

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P. 0. Box 18623 Lenox Squire Station 
ATLANTA, GA-, 30326 



This is Guillet Studio 





We are now showing Potpourri proofs. 
Hours: 3-5 p.m. through Nov. 27th 

Special reduced prices for prints 

No charge for your proofs 



mation. Application forms for 
SCAN can also be obtained at the 
Placement Center. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
UJ Mon-Fri — 5:45 
ISat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Now Through 
Saturday 
Audrey Hepburn 
Albert Finney 

"TWO FOR THE 
ROAD" 



Color 




Sun - Mon - Tues 

I James MacArthur 
Richard Todd 
Susan Oliver 

"THE LOVE-INS" 

Color 

Starts Wednesday 

Dean Martin 

['THE SILENCERS' 
and 

I'MURDER'S ROW' 
Both in Color 



CHI EF , 

D R I VE -I N v , 



Last Time Tonight 

Tony Franciosa 
Raquel Welch 
"FATHOM" 
Color 

Saturday Only 

Yul Brynner 
"RETURN OF 
THE SEVEN" 

Color 

— Co-Feature — 
Dean Martin 
Kim Novak 

'KISS ME STUPID' 

Sun - Mon - Tues 

Graig Stevens 
"GUNN" 

Color 

Wednesday 

"Buck Night" 
"A FUNNY THING 
HAPPENED ON 
THE WAY TO 
THE FORUM" 

— Plus — 

"MAGNIFICENT 
SEVEN" 

Both in Color 



Buttons! 



See Page 2 




urrant 



s 



auce 



Comedy! 

See Page 8 



Vol. LVI— No. 13 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



Aycock, Too 

McKeithen To 
Speek Here At 
SUSGA Meet 

Complementing the other 
ativities of the Annual 
Christmas Festival will be 
the Fourth Annual Conven- 
tion of the Louisiana State 
Southern Universities Stu- 
dent Government Associa- 
tion Convention, Dec. 1 and 2. 

Highlighted by such speakers 
as Gov. John J. McKiethen and 
Lt. Gov. C. C. Aycock, who will 
attend the Saturday Banquet, and 
student leaders from all over the 
state, the gathering will be com- 
posed of two full days of study 
and discussion. 

Members of the Northwestern 
SGA have planned general ses- 
sions to be held in the Student 
Union Ballroom and smaller dis- 
cussion groups which will parti- 
cipate in separate panels. 

During the convention, all of 
the various aspects of student 
government will be discussed. 

Master of Ceremonies for the 
conference will be Scotty Max- 
well who is the treasurer of the 
Northwestern SGA and the chair- 
man of the state division of the 
organization. Maxwell is respons- 
ible for the bulk of the planning 
of the event. 

The conference begins with 
registration at 9 a.m. Dec. 1 and 
the opening" session is set for 
11 a.m. in the Student Union 
Ballroom 

Following the closing session 
at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, the visiting 
delegations from throughout the 
state will view the Christmas fes- 
tival parade and fireworks and 
the lighting of the city's Christ- 
mas lights, an annual event 
which draws some 50,000 visi- 
tors to the city. 

The SUSGA organization is 
composed of student leaders 
from some 130 colleges and uni- 
versities from throughout the 
south. 

The basic reason for the con- 
tinued existence of this organi- 
zation is to coordinate ideas 
gathered from various universi- 
ties and colleges so that all might 
have an available reservoir of 
material on tentative programs 
and thus increase the effective- 
ness of their programs. 

Among the various assists that 
Northwestern has already re- 
ceived from the SUSGA organi- 
zation have been plans for a 
school travel board, group book- 
ln g for big name entertainment 
at less expense, and discussion 
concerning more than one SGA 
advisor. 

Songfest To 
Feature Groups 
In Musical Skits 

The songs of Christmas will 
nil the Fine Arts Auditorium 
Thursday, Nov. 30, 7:00 p.m. The 
occasion is the annual N.S.C. 
Songfest sponsored by the S.G.A. 

Twelve groups, including frat- 
ernities, sorities. and religious 
organizations will take part in 
the program of Christmas music. 
tac hgroup will sing a maximum 
of three songs or a minimum of 
wo songs during a 15 minute 
allotted period by piano or stan- 
dard quitar. 

Admission will be 75 cents for 
adult and 50 cents for students 
d ncl children. Proceeds will be 
used to buy Christmas liyhts for 
l "e campus. 

All students are urged to "turn 
°ut, so we can turn on." 




Viet Nam Writer 
To Discuss War 

Front Line Correspondent 
Scheduled For Assembly 



STRATEGY IN THE RICE PADDIES . . . War Correspondent Craig 
Spence looks on intently as a South Vietnamese Officer outlines troop 
strategy. Spence, a roving reporter for the Mutual Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, will be the all-college assembly speaker, Nov. 29. 



By Gidget Maxwell 

Craig Spence, key war cor- 
respondent for the Mutual 
Broadcasting System, will be 
the guest speaker for the 
next all-college assembly, 
scheduled Wednesday, Nov. 
29, at 10 a.m. in the Fi ne 
Arts Auditorium, it was an- 
nounced last week by Mrs. 
E. Weber Cote, Assembly 
Committee chairman. 

Spence, who has spent 
much time accompanying Amer- 
ican soldiers on missions in the 
war zone, will be able to give 
the students an accurate account 
on our country's actions and 
policies in Viet Nam. 

Spence prefers front line re- 
porting to Saigon speculating. 
He is one of the few reporters 
who has toured all of South Viet 
Nam over the last several years 
covering every type of combat 
operation — setting up ambush 



Expansion, 
First Press 

By Diane Nickerson, Editor 

Expansion programs, both 
academic and physical, cam- 
pus traffic problems, and 
"weevils" were topics of dis- 
cussion Monday night at the 
first presidential press con- 
ference since President Ar- 
nold Kilpatrick officially as- 
sumed office July 1. 

Five Sauce editors were guests 
of the President for dinner at the 
Student Union Monday night 
when they interviewed both Kil- 
patrick and Dean Charles F. 
Thomas on administrative polici- 
es, expectations and actions. 

During the conference the 
President revealed that he and 
other administrative personnel 
were asking the State Legislature 
this session for funds for a $3 
million library and a gigantic dor- 
mitory and cafeteria complex 
that would house and feed some 
1600 men and women students. 
Tentative plans call for the new 
library to be built where the 
frame dormitories are presently 
located. 

Also included in the request to 
the legislature, stated Kilpatrick, 
is a $1 million allocation for con- 
structing a horseshoe seating 
structure at Demon stadium. 

Plans are already on the draw- 
ing board, reported Dean Thomas, 
for a new women's gym and 
Biology building. The proposed 
gymnasium will be constructed 
on the hillside behind Sabine 
Hall and the Biology building 
adjacent to the present Biological 
Science building. 

Academic Changes 

When asked about plans for 
improving academic standards, 
the president noted that steps 
to academic improvement were 
begun last year when the col- 
lege's 18 departments were re- 
vamped and reorganized into 28. 

Sauce editors also quizzed the 
president on the possibility of 
Northwestern changing to the 
quarter system, such as was re- 
cently adopted by Tech. Dean 



Traffic, Weevils Are 
Conference Topics 



Thomas noted that when North- 
western first opened as Louisiana 
State Normal, it was on the quar- 
ter system. In fact, the adminis- 
trative dean pointed out, "We 
remained on that system until 
1940." 

The present trend throughout 
the nation, stated the two ad- 
ministrative heads, is away from 
the quarter program, which often 
has its drawbacks. These draw- 
backs were among the reasons 
the college chose to remain on 
the semester system. 

No More Weevils 

Over $6,000 worth of food con- 
taining weevils was removed 
from Iberville cafeteria several 
weeks ago, reported Dean Tho- 
mas, when asked about the re- 
ports that weevils had been found 
in cafeteria food. 

Sauce editors had brought the 



weevil situation to the attention 
of College Business Manager Ted 
Wright weeks ago when student 
reports of the infested food were 
submtted to the Sauce. 

Wright and other administra- 
tive officials then contacted the 
Adams Pest Control Company of 
Alexandria which inspected the 
entire stock of food in Iberville 
and removed the estimated $6,000 
worth of food supplies. The pest 
control company took steps to 
remove the weevils and is now 
checking for the insects daily and 
will continue its check for sever- 
al months. 

Kilpatrick and Thomas both 
emphasized that this was an iso- 
lated incident. "We are so proud 
of our cafeteria," stated Thomas, 
"that when we have guests we 
take them to the dining hall for 



traps with the Australians in 
War Zone "D" — traveling with 
U.S. Marines in operations in Da 
Nang and spending nights with 
Special Forces at besieged Due 
Co. — flying on Forward Air con- 
trol missions and B-57 bombing 
an,d strafing raids under Viet 
Cong fire and fighting with the 
First Cavalry as door gunner on 
a chopper during famed "Oper- 
ation Irving" in Central High- 
lands. 

Tentative plans have been 
made for Mr. Spence to appear 
as an expert guest in a panel 
discussion hosted by the Speech 
212 Discussion Class Nov. 29 at 
2 p.m. Wednesday. David Faraldo 
will serve as chairman of this 
discussion which will be in the 
Student Union Ballroom. The 
probable topic for the discussion 
will be the making of a candi- 
date. 

The alternate subject chosen 
is the slanting of news. Mr. 
Spence is expected to be on hand 
for coffees, discussions, and class 
appearances throughout the day. 

The next assembly will be the 
annual Christmas program which 
will feature the band in concert 
directed by Robert Smith. 

It has been the policy of the 
administration to dismiss classes 
for these seldom-cheduled as- 
sembly programs and to close 
campus-operated facilities to per- 
mit the students to attend. 

meals. This just isn't heard of 
at other colleges." 

Traffic Problems 
Some $150,000 is being request- 
ed, according to President Kil- 
patrick, for the construction of 
parking lots at various campus 
sites. Included in this sum are 
funds for paving the large dirt 
parking lot in front of Rapides 
Hall. 

Kilpatrick pointed out that the 
college was "having to change 
many things, not always because 
we want to, but because we have 
to." 

This reference was made to the 
recent traffic ordinance requir- 

(See Press Conference, Page 5) 



Student Vote To Decide 



'Professor Of Year' Procedures 
To Change For Tuesday Election 



Do you have a favorite teacher 
whom you feel best exemplifies 
the qualities of leadership and 
teacher ability? If you do, you 
and other students will have an 
opportunity to nominate him or 
her for Professor of the Year 
Tuesday when the Potpourri staff 
conducts student nominations in 
the Student Union. 

All students, except first se- 
mester freshmen, will be able to 
cast votes for their favorite teach- 
er from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the 
second floor of the Student 
Union. Nominations will be plac- 
ed in a locked box and results 
will be tabulated by Potpourri 
staff members. 

The teacher receiving the most 
nominations will automatically be 
named NSC's Professor of the 



Year and will be featured in the 
1968 Potpourri. Winner of last 
year's contest was Dr. Gordon 
Flood, former college music in- 
structor and choral director. 

Any full-time, part-time or as- 
sociate professor or instructor 
who teaches college approved 
courses is eligible for nomination. 
However, students must have had 
class under the instructor some 
time during their college career. 

Potpourri editor Pat Bales ur- 
ges students to "bear in mind 
when making nominations that 
this is not a popularity contest. 
Instead, it is your opportunity to 
pay tribute to an instructor you 
feel best exemplifies those quali- 
ties of leadership and ability you 
expect in a teacher." 




'Potpourri' Editor Pat Bales 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



The College Buttons 



BUTTONS, BUTTONS! They're everywhere now, 
and this week the Current Sauce contributes to 
the rage with this all-in-fun display of some suc- 
cinct slogans we'd like to see worn around the 
Northwestern Campus. 



ITS 

POT 



it 



\t4 



UN\CH tS * 

YOUR 



is 



rah*n 



1* w 



Clubs Can Rent ] 
Holiday Booths 
On Riverfront 

Riverbank booth space is still 
available for interested college 
clubs and organizations for the 
annual Natchitoches Christmas 
Lighting Festival, Dec. 1-3. 

Concession stands can be rent- 
ed for $35 for the weekend fest- 
ival by contacting David McClung 
at 352-8701, after 7:30 p.m. or by 
writing McClung at 608 Whit- 
field, Natchitoches. 

One of the highlights of the 
two-day Christmas festival is the 
annual Christmas parade, Dec. 
2. The theme for this year's par- 
ade is "Christmas Around the 
World." 

Campus organizations wishing 
to enter floats in the city parade 
should contact Mrs. Robert Nix, 
Ph. 352-6404. Three prizes will be 
awarded the best entrees, accord- 
ing to Mrs. Nix. The first place 
float will receive $225; second, 
$150; and third, $75. 



Minutes of SGA 



President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Minutes were read 
and approved. Roll called. Absent were 
Brown, Skinner, Ferrera, and McCol- 
lum. Late were M. Fowler, Lowe, Kirk, 
and Nicholson. 

Pres. Newbury announced that pic- 
tures will be made next Monday night 
at 6:00 for the Potpourri. 

Burnes reported for the Election 
Board that the Mr. and Miss NSC elec- 
tions will be on December 12 and in 
case of a run-off it is scheduled for 
December 14. Results of the election 
will be announced at the Christmas 
assembly. Posters will be placed on 
campus to publicize the election. The 
Current Sauce will publish names of 
the candidates during the first week 
of December. 

Bill Fowler reported for the Enter- 
tainment Comfittee that much work has 
been done toward the spring entertain- 
ment. Also, that nominations for the 
Lady of the Bracelet pagent have been 
received. The preliminaries will be on 
Monday, November 20, in the Student 
Union Ballroom out of which 20 girls 
will be chosen to participate December 
4 for the pageant. 

The student faculty relations com- 
mittee is working on the booklet which 
will include various phases of academic 
life and work. 

Fowler read the minutes from the 
student traffic committee. Various 
problems were discussed and solutions 
offered. The main solution the group 
felt was to enforce the one way driv- 
ing on Sibley Drive only during certain 
hours. Dean Fulton stated he felt this 
recommendation might have a fair 
hearing. 

The student service committee report 
was given by Toni Rispoli. He stated 
that they are trying to get a clock and 
place it in the Post Office and Student 
Union so that it will face both areas. 
Other problems are being worked on 
to find satisfactory soultions. 

McPherson reported that the Song- 
fest has 13 organizations entered and 
gave times for rehearsal. 

Maxwell stated that everything is 
underway for the SUSGA State Con- 
ference to be held here at NSC. Assign- 
ments of various types have been made 
to students wishing to help. Plans will 
be completed at future committee 
meetings. 

Freshman Associates have been as- 
signed to work with the AWS and AMS 
on the NSC Howdy Days. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

Germany reported that yast year's 
school spirit trophies will be presented 
prior to the entertainment show on 
Dec. 2. 

It was brought to the attention of 
SGA that last weeks motion to make 
the trophies non-revolving for school 
spirit was unconstitutional as stated. 



The motion and second was withdrawn. 

The budget was again presented to 
members of the SGA for their approval 
after a motion was passed to untable 
the budget. Each item was read and 
discussed if questions arose. Maxwell 
moved we accept the budget. Seconded 
by Townsend. Questioned by Butler. 
Motion passed. 

It was stated that a bus should be 
made available to all NSC students 
wishing to attend the Southeastern 
game. Maxwell moved tickets be plac- 
ed on sale in Mrs. Scroggins' office 
Tues. morning. 

Seconded by P^echt. Questxn called 
by Gray. Motion carried. Price of the 
tickets will be determined after dis- 
cussion with the company. 

A discussion took place about the 
decorations for Christmas here on cam- 
pus. It was reported that the meeting 
of organization heads felt the musical 
Christmas tree would not be satis- 
factory at this time. Pres. Newbury ap- 
pointed a committee headed by Cooper 
to look into the possibilities about 
decorations and bring a report next 
week on their findings. 

Pres. Newby announced the establish- 
ment of an SGA Post Office Box, num- 
ber 5182. This is primarily because 
there has been some confusion and 
loss of mail. 

The idea of a double name for our 
school mascot was discussed. President 
Newbury appointed Kirk to find out 
about the "demon" running on the 
field at halftime. Other ideas for school 
spirit were discussed. 

Maxwell moved that we put into 
the bylaws to continue the Ricky Brown 
outstanding Freshman award. Second- 
ed by Townsend . Question called by 
Butler. Motion carried. 

Newbury asked M. Fowler and Bates 
to make a combined faculty-student 
committee list. Maxwell asked other 
members to report on various activities. 

Kirk moved the meeting be adjourn- 
ed. Seconded by Townsend. Motion 
passed. Meeting Adjourned. 
Respectfully Submitted 
Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 



BA Students Rank 
High On National 
Accounting Tests 

Nineteen students in the 
School of Business have scored 
above the national average in the 
National Achievement Test for 
Accounting. 

The tests were administered to 
all accounting majors here and 
were graded nationally by the 
American Institute of Certified 
Public Accountants. 

Northwestern's accounting stu- 
dents finished five percent high- 
er than the national average for 
college and university students. 

Dr. Earl Thames, head of the 
accounting department, said two 
tests were administered and eval- 
uated, one for advanced students 
and the other for intermediate 
students. 

Students scoring in the upper 
percentages nationally were 
James Wayne Doyal, James Ed- 
ward Robertson. Robert K. Jones, 
Donald Moore, Donald Turnbow, 
loan Eddlemon, Edgar Huckie, 
Henry Burns, Hal Norris, Betty 
Green, Samuel L. Smith, Donald 
Ray Choate, Jr. 

Travis Lynn Bolton, Sharlee 
Davis, Lynn Shivers, Charles Jo- 
seph Vasquez, Harold Benton 
Teer, Jr., Joseph Z. Simmons, and 
Ronald Wayne Fletcher 



Alumni Officials For '67-'68 Named 



New officers for the Alumni 
Association for the coming year 
were elected at Homecoming in 
the Student Union. 

Ralph Butler of Shreveport was 
elected president of the Associ- 
ation while Parker Wiggins of 
Monroe was chosen as vice-pres- 



ident. Harrell Haile of Natchi- 
toches will serve as Secretery- 
treasurer. Haile is also placement 
director here at the college. 

The newly elected officers will 
serve until Homecoming next 
year when officers for 1968-69 
will be chosen 



It's "What's Happening 



Friday, November 17 

Iota Lambda Initiation, SU 320-321, 
6 p.m. and Banquet, SU Ballroom, 
7:30 p.m. 

Delta Zeta Hayride, DZ House, 7 p.m. 
College Theatre Play, "Amphitryon 
38',' FA Auditorium, 8 p.m. 

Saturday, November 18 

Football Game — NSC vs Southeastern, 
Hammond, SLC Stadium, 7:30 p.m. 
Monday, November 20 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, SU, 6 p.m. 

Demeter Fraternity and Rodeo Club 
Meeting, SU 321, 6:30 p.m. 

Southern Bell Training Program, 
SU 316, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



Student Union Entertainment 

Committee Meeting, SU 315, 4 p.m. 
Tuesday, November 21 

Southern Bell Training Program, 

SU 316, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Scuba Club Meeting, SU 321, 5:30 p.m. 
Political Science Meeting, SU 241, 

7 p.m. 

Wednesday, November 22 

Thanksgiving Holiday Begins, Noon 
Classes resume Monday, Nov. 27 
8: a.m. 

Southern Bell Training Program 

SU 316, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Student Union Fine Arts Committee 

Meeting, SU 313, 4 p.m. 



Letter t The Editor 



Dear Editor, 

Now that the football season is 
almost at an end, I have run ac- 
ross some good comments by 
football coaches and their tho- 
ughts right beside their actual 
comments. Some of these things 
may have run through Coach Gos- 
sets mind during the season, or 
perhaps on his T. V. program. 

"They sprang some new offen- 
se on us." (They blocked and 
tackled.) 

"We never lost our poise." 
(Our guys were nonchalant when 
we started and still nonchalant 
when the score was 63-0 against 
us. What we really lost was our 
iindifference.) 

"He'll give you 150 per cent on 
every play." (If you don't mind, 
I'd rather have Gale Sayers giv- 
ing 50 per cent — We'd come out 
way ahead.) 

"We made too many mistakes 
out there." (Like scheduling them 
n the first place. We got a good, 
game athletic director. Compared 
to our schedule, the Christians 
vs. The Lions was a tossup.) 

"IH have to see the films." 
(Who am I kidding? I don't even 
want to see that game in stills.) 

"We didn't win, but we weren't 
outhit" (Too bad it wasn't the 
Golden Gloves.) 

"This team has a lot of desire." 
(What it desires is more ability.) 

"You can't single out any one 
boy because it's hard to see the 
game down on the field." (Par- 
ticularly if your team is flat on 
its back all day.) 

"We have to plug up some 
holes in our defense." (Eleven, to 
be exact.) 

"I know one thing— this is a 
hungry team." (If you don't be- 
lieve me, ask the chef. They ate 
a whole herd last week.) 

"We didn't recruit that boy be- 
cause he didn't fit our image." 
(Besides, he broke the rope and 
got away. Anyway, for him to get 
our signals, our quarterback 
would have to learn to growl.) 

"Our quarterback is exceptional 
at reading a defense." (I'd feel 
better if he could read a book— it 
would be easier to keep him el- 
igible.) 

"I told our boys they put their 
pants on one leg at a time, same 
as we do." (NO, they don't) they 
cut the back of them with a ra- 
zor so they'll fit over those 25- 
mch calves). What I should say 
about those stOds is they 
their pants on one hoof at 
time.) 

"Do we pay any attention . 
polls? Not any wore than anyone 
else." (Not anymore than Presi- 
dent Johnson, for instance.) 

"I expect a clean, hard-fought 



game." (Personally, I'd rather 
watch a broken beer-bottle fight. 
When you get down on their 5- 
yard-line the most legal thing 
they do is bite.) 

"May the better team win." 
(No, I'd much rather my team 
won, and if we're better than 
them, someone slipped me the 
wrong set of movies.) 

Sincerely, 

A Demon Rooter 



put 
a 

to 



29 October, 1967 
At Sea 

Dear Editor, 

We the men of OC division ask 
for your help in a most urgent 
matter. We would appreciate it if 
you could print either an article 
or this letter in the campus news- 
paper. 

We believe that we have finally 
conquered the problem that has 
plagued sea farers since the days 
of the Vikings. We know that to 
the layman of the briney deep, 
our greatest problem would seem 
to be the savage seas or the con- 
stant threat of pirates, sea ser- 
pents, etc. . .However, we would 
gladly face any one of these tri- 
vialities to resolve our real prob- 
lem, Women!! 

Like the song says, "There 
Ain't Nothing Like a Dame". If 
you don't believe it now, an eight 
month cruise will make a be- 
liever out of anybody. There are 
4000 just such believers stationed 
aboard the "Good Ship Roose- 
velt." There are also 4000 young 
men about to lose their minds. 

So now girls, you can see our 
problem, and it is in your hands. 
We are all counting on you for 
those beautiful, heartwarming, 
and informative letters. 

Men of OC Division 
USS Franklin D. Roosevelt 
Fleet Post Office 
New York, N. Y. 09501 

c fr@urrent Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

N»^i% red K as f? cond c >ass matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
1""* 3 - Published weekly, ex- 

th* fa n nn f holldav s and test weeks, in 
summil a K ,?™ B ' and bi-weekly in the 
J* °« Student Body of North- 

cVtau™ « tS Co " ege of Lou *siana. Sub- 
cnption $3 the year pay able in advance. 

Pre^" ° f tte Ass °ciated Collegiate 

Diane Nickerson .... Editor 

FrTnc°es Q To. n er ~~A^. EdUor' 

J» K«.™r Co-Sports Editor 
Wavne f P Rrin V Co-Sports Editor 
Al sSvnX t0n * Business Manager 
Chart! AssOC ' Bus "iess Manager 
Dianip rf£l m,er Campus Editor 

Jmv Pi. CrSOn Sta « Artist 

Reoorrei, m Facult y Advisor 
Weemann r, Mary „ Am Anderson, Pat 
Rav ^InS D - a "? ny Bo «twcU. Gail Dooley, 
TO m er^ < r£, dg S t £ Ia * weU > Jack Mont- 

£ aiW J Uddle - Shlrley Rut - 

K' Alton Sanders. Ed Thompson. 
Thomas Turner and Virginia Ann Wo- 



■■■■ 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page ? 



Gold Medal Gymnast Discusses 
His Sport His Team, His Coach 



By Sid Turner 

Sauce Sports Staff Writer 
Lurking beneath the guise of a 
typical college student is a gym- 
nast who has twice been named 
NAIA National Champion, has 
won one gold and two silver 
medals at the Pan Aamerican 
Games in Winnipeg, Canada, 
and has recently returned to 
the campus from the pre-Olym- 
pic Games in Mexico City. 

Richard Loyd is the best gym- 
nast that this college has ever 
produced. He is a five foot, five 
inch, 140-pound electronics ma- 
jor from Alexandria. A graduate 
of Bolton High School, Loyd 
"became interested in gymnas- 
tics and tumbling about the se- 
venth grade," and a rigorous 
training program and dedication 
to the sport have brought him 
honors in competition all over 



the world. He and John Ellas, 
another member of the United 
States Champion Gymnastics 
team wll travel to the Mdwest 
Open Championship in Illinois 
Dec. 1 and 2. 

Loyd practices about three 
hours, six days a week, which 
doesn't leave time for many ex- 
tracuricular activities, although 
he finds time for diversions such 
as playing the guitar and photo- 
graphy. 

In his latest competition at 
Mexico City, Loyd didn't do os 
well as he had hoped because of 
illness, but said that the repor- 
ted lack of oxygen due to the 
altitude of that city didn't bo- 
ther him, and he doesn't foresee 
any great problems for the Olym- 
pic team, "except possibly the 
long-distance runners." 

Events in which he competes 



include free exercise, sidehorse, 
rings, vaulting, parallel bars, 
and horizontal bars. 

Loyd did not predict a win for 
the U.S. Gymnastic team in the 
Olympics. He predicts fifth or 
sixth place for the team because 
"European countries, such as 
Russia, place a lot more emphasis 
on gymnastics and so the quality 
of the teams is usually better 
than the United States team." 

Predictions for this year's De- 
mon squad are much brighter, 
however. Loyd said that this 
year's team is "the strongest 
ever" and reports that the Demon 
new coach Armando Vega is one 
of the best-known and respected 
coaches in the country. A former 
National Champion Gymnast, Ve- 
ga is a graduate of Penn State 
and comes here from Los Ange- 
les. 




PERFECTION OF FORM — Gold Medal winner Richard Loyd runs 
through a series of gymnastic floor exercises, demonstrating the 
form and coordination that sent him to the Olympic tryouts in Mexico 
City, and helped his own Demon squad to win first in NAIA and AAU 
competition. 



We're pRO\/idii\q 

ElECTRiciTy 

foR youR 

SHAVER... 




AS WeII AS pREpARiNQ 

For tIhe QROw/iiNCj 

POWER NEEck 

of LouisiANA S 
cMes Ai\d Farims! 

This year the five Investor-Owned Electric Companies are spending 
more than $148,500,000 for the construction of new electric 
facilities in Louisiana. This investment will provide more 
low-cost electric power to serve factories, businesses, schools, 
homes, farms - everyone in Louisiana! Through new 
construction programs, these five electric companies continue 
to stay ahead of Louisiana's growing power needs! 

Let's keep good things going for our state with plenty of low-cost electric 

power from the five INVESTOR-OWNED ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

OF LOUISIANA! • Louisiana Power & Light Co. • Gulf States Utilities Co. 

Southwestern Electric Power Co. • Central Louisiana Electric Co. 

New Orleans Public Service Inc. 




x-age -i 



iHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



Light and Ice 



Simon And Garfunkel Are Genuine, Candid At Interview 




GEi\Uli> Oi umuERSTATEMENT—In an enthusiastically-received, 
low-key concert Tuesday evening in the Coliseum, Paul Simon (right) 
and Art Garfunkel reiterated their themes of human isolation, lack 
of communication, and social injustice. 



By Jim O'Quinn 

The sounds were clear as light 
and ice. 

Paul Simon was delighted with 
himself. For him then it was pos- 
sible, with just a movement, a 
sudden crescendo, a smile, to 
sway or excite or move thousands 
of people who were tuned in on 
him and the sound. He watched 
the students at his feet, reading 
their faces, gauging the effect. 

Art Garfunkel, not yet having 
completely overcome an awful 
shyness that at one time made it 
painful for him to sing before 
even a small group, moved out- 
side himself. He felt himself 
among the students there on the 
floor, feeling and thinking the 
music, trying to understand more 
than it is possible to say or sing. 
Another part of him was in the 
sound, touching it, carving it out 
of the light in the center of the 
darkness. 

"I have sung the songs so much 
that for me they have completely 
lost their original meaning," Si- 
mon said later backstage. "Some- 
times when we're singing I start 
listening and discover them all 
over again." 

Music Is Personal 

"It doesn't make you feel 
strange to offer something so 
personal as your songs to thou- 
sands of people?" an Alexandria 
Town Talk reporter asked. 

"No," Simon said "It's person- 
al for them, too, as much as for 
me. In a totally different way." 

"It's obvious you have a 'mess- 
age' in your music — can you sum 
it up or explain it in just a few 
words?" a Sauce staffer ven- 
tured. 

Simon was offended. "No 'mes- 



sage' — it changes, not only with 
us, but with the people who hear 
it. As a writer I try to stay out 
of the way of my 'message.' " 

The managers began letting in 
crowds of after-the-show auto- 
graph-seekers. The performers 
were in blue jeans now, sitting 
atop a sheetless bunk bed in a 
Coliseum dressing room. 

A gaggle of vividly-dressed 
high school girls led the assault, 
jabbering and thrusting papers 
and pens at the young men. 

It must have happened a thou- 
sand times, but Garfunkel was 
disconcerted. He shrugged and 
grinned and looked at the re- 
porters and said, "Great isn't 
it?" 

Beads and Flowers 

"I write music and play, too," 
a dark bushy-haired high-schooler 
was telling Simon from the end 
of the bed. 

"It's always groovy to see some- 
body who's really doing some- 
thing," the professional told the 
boy, sincerely. 

The managers let in a larger 
group of students at another en- 
trance. These were collegians, 
and some had come from as far 
as LSU and Southwestern to 
hear the concert. There were 
girls in high boots, and among 
them were boys with beads and 
flowers. 

The talk turned to psychedelic 
music and university graduate 
programs and legalization of 
drugs. Somebody had Simon 
sign an autograph on what ap- 
peared to be a marijuana packet 

"Dylan takes recording very 
seriously," Garfunkel was telling 
a Tech boy dressed in loose 



'SB 

"*T*I 



TIL i| 

I he Hugger 




'68 Camaro: 

Accelerates smoother, hugs the road tighter, 
rides quieter than ever before. 



Comoro SS Coup* 



A quiet car speaks for itself. 
That's why Chevrolet went 
all out to make the '68 
Camaro smoother, steadier 
and mere silent than ever. 
Comoro's famous road- 
hugginq performance has 
been improved with a refined 
suspension sysrem. 
Comoro's big-car ride has 
been improved, too. Soft 
rubber cushions snuff out 



road noise and vibrations. 
Even Comoro's new Astro 
Ventilation works for your 
peace and quiet. Adjustable 
vent-ports built in the 
instrument panel let outside 
air circulate without wind or 
noise. You don't even have 
to open a window! It all adds 
up to the silent ride of quality. 
See for yourself. Put a hushed 
'68 Camaro through its paces 
at your Chevrolet dealer's. 



All these Chevrolet 
quality features, too: 

® Unitized all-welded 
Body by Fisher. 

• Power team choices up 
to a 396-cubic-inch V8. 

• Self-adjusting Safety- 
Master brakes with 
dual cylinders. 



• An automatic buzzer 
that reminds you to 
take your keys with 
you. 

• Proved safety features 
like the GM-developed 
energy-absorbing 
steering column and 
many new ones that 
include armrest- 
shielded door handles. 



£33k 



Be smart! Be sure! Buy now at your Chevrolet dealer's. 



khakis and a farm shirt, when 
somebody introduced Simon to 
Mary Smith from LSU. She was 
tall and talkative with straight 
shiny red hair, and when Simon 
shook her hand he did not let go. 

Life in the Woods 

"Yes, 'He Was My Brother' is 
based on f a c t — an incident 
which happened in Philadelphia, 
Mississippi, involving Andy Good- 
man, an old classmate of mine." 

"I'm working on my doctorate 
in math at Columbia," Garfunkel 
explained again. "I'll probably 
taech eventually — in college, 
maybe in England.' 
maybe in England." 

"We're both 26." 

"Very Jewish. Garfunkel is an 
ian, I've been told." 

"I dig New Orleans. We were 
only there for one day this week, 
but the city was too much. I 
don't usually like cities." 

Simon was still holding Mary 
Smith's hand. Garfunkel climed 
down from the bed and wan- 
dered out the door into the big 




dark parking lot behind the Col- 
iseum, followed by hippie-types 
and reporters. He was carrying 
a copy of Thoreau's Walden, or 
Life in the woods. 

"Our new album will be called 
'Book Ends', Simon was telling 
the others. 'It will have 'Overs,' 
and 'At the Zoo', and 'Faking It'. 
Should be out in about ten 
months." He held Mary Smith's 
hand and walked out with her 
and the others across the wide 
lot to a waiting car. 

A Goodbye Kiss 
"It was great, it was wonderful," 
people began saying, and Simon 
said "Groovy, man, great." 

Garfunkel was talking about 
professions, and how you could 
never really know what you 
wanted to do all your life. He 
got in the back seat. Simon got 
in the front, and the driver 
started the car. Simon rolled up 
the window as a group of strag- 
glers, more high school girls, ran 
up to the car from the corner of 
the Coliseum. 

"We just want to look," one 
squealed, and they peered the 
glass at the singers. "I want 
to touch him!" another cried. 
Simon rolled the window back 
down so she could touch him. 

Then Mary Smith pushed her 
way up to the window, and the 
hippies were yelling, "Give her 
a goodbye kiss! A goodbye kiss!" 

So Paul Simon kissed Mary 
Smith very hard on the mouth 
for a long time through the open 
window, while the hippies laugh- 
ed and sang around the car in the 
center of the darkness. 

Then the car moved away and 
they were gone 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

This will be the final Sauce 
issue until Wednesday, Dec. 6. 
Under a new program to better 
serve the students, the Sauce will 
be printed and distributed each 
Wednesday. All news copy for 
the Dec. 6 issue should be sub- 
mitted to the Sauce by Dec. 2. 



STAMP IT! 

irS THI KAOI 
REGULAR 
MODEL 

any gn 

3 LINE TEXT Cm 
T* *mt IKOfSTRUCTnU METAL 




* h mk «r moerr arte. B* 
to Mafe mi »■ Cei*. Xo 



TMB MOf»t» OO. 

mmK at, mm 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page 5 



GUARANTEED MINIMUM INCOME? Thafs the subject in question for this large crew of college de- 
baters, nine of whom traveled to Louisiana Tech last weekend for tournament competition in team and 
individual events. The squad, under the supervision of Debate Coach Ray Schexidner, pulled a third 
place in the tournament, which included teams from schools in Louisiana, Texas, and Mississippi. 



Music Department 
Members Appear 
On TV Program 

John Maltese, assistant profes- 
sor of music and two student 
music majors appeared last week 
on the Ethma Odum television 
show in Alexandria. The KALB 
Channel 5 telecast was seen on 
Nov. 8 and featured Johnette 
Johnston, a sophomore violin ma- 
jor from Shreveport. 

Miss Johnston played a selec- 
tion entitled Larghetto by Handel 
and was accompanied by Susan 
Michael, a junior piano major 
from Alexandria. Miss Johnston 
is a graduate of Fair Park High 
School and is a member of the 
first violin section of the Natchit- 
oches - Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra. Miss Michael came to 
Northwestern from Providence 
Central High School and has been 
active in college as a piano solo- 
ist and accompanist. 

Maltese was interviewed by 
Mrs Odum about history and tech- 
nique of playing the violin, after 
which he introduced the student 
performers. The Music Depart- 
ment is featured the second Wed- 
nesday of each month on this pop- 
ular interview-type program. 

Cannon Brought 
By Kappa Alpha 

Members of Kappa Alpha fra- 
ternity will usher in their annual 
Old South celebration with the 
addition of one major item — a 
long awaited cannon that will 
arrive on campus next week. 

The big gun will be a full size 
replica of an authentic Civil War 
field piece in keeping with the 
tradition of Kappa Alpha chap- 
ters all over the South. 

In addition to awaiting the 
arrival of the cannon, the pledges 
have been practicing the numbers 
which they will perform in the 
Intrafraternity Council songfest. 

Press Conference— 

(Continued from page 1) 
ing all traffic to turn west on 
Sibley Drive when exiting from 
parking lots onto the street. 
When asked about the effective- 
ness of the regulation. Dean 
Thomas replied that the new or- 
dinance was "really working." 
Press Conference 
Plans for future monthly press 
conferences with President Kil- 
patrick were formulated Monday 
night. Kilpatrick agreed to meet 
each month with representatives 
of the school publications and 
members of the student body for 
a session of question and answers 
lead by members of the Sauce 
staff. 

Dec. 5 was set aside as the date 
for the first presidential press 
conference. The meeting will be 
conducted in the SGA Conference 
Room in the Student Union and 
will be open to the public. 



ROTC Staff Bolstered 
With. Viet Nam Vet 



The Northwestern ROTC staff 
recently added a new member. 
He is Capt. Paul R. Lister, a 
native of La Mesa, New Mexico. 

Capt. Lister graduated from 
New Mexico State College in 
1962 with a degree in math- 
matics. He is now working toward 
his masters degree here in ad- 
dition to his ROTC duties. 

After graduation, Capt. Lister 
attended the Basic Armor Course 
at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, and was 
then assigned to the 25th Divi- 
sion stationed in Hawaii. During 
his two-and-one-half year stay in 
Hawaii, he spent four months 
temporary duty in Vietnam with 
the 120th Aviation Company in 
Saigon. He returned to Hawii for 
a short time before being re- 
assigned in Viet Nam, this time 
with his 25th Division. He re- 
mained there for the customary 
one year, during which time he 
held various positions including 
command and staff, with the 1st 
Battalion, 69th Armor, in some 
of the heaviest fighting that the 
unit came into conact with, in 
the guerilla warfare. 

Upon his return to the U. S., 
Capt. Lister was assigned to the 
1st Armored Division, Ft. Hood, 
Texas where he served as execu- 
tive officer of 2nd Battalion, 81st 
Armor. From Ft. Hood, he went 
back to Ft. Knox to attend the 
Associate Armor Career Course 
there. After completion of the 



curriculum, he came to NSC in 
August of this year. 

Capt. Lister is married to the 
former Martha Lightfoot of 
Anthony, New Mexico. The Lis- 
ters reside at 1533 Hill Ave., 
here in Natchitoches. 

Capt. Lister's decorations in- 
clude the Bronze Star; the Air 
Medal with two oak leaf clusters; 
the Army Commendation Medal; 
the National Defense Service 
Medal; and the Vietnamese Ser- 
vice Medal. 



Phi Mu Sorority 
Lists Activities 

The newest addition to the 
Greek family, Phi Mu colony, has 
been involved in many activities 
ranging from selling cokes dur- 
ing a recent historical tour to 
working on a Homecoming dis- 
play. 

During the Natchitoches his- 
torical tour, Phi Mu served as 
hostesses at the Well's home. 
Members also sold cokes and cof- 
fee. 

Phi Mu, working with Kappa 
Alpha fraternity, placed second 
in the Greek division of Home- 
coming display contest. A rating 
of honorable mention was also re- 
ceived in overall competition. 

In addition to these activities, 
Phi Mu pledges were recently 
entertained at a coke party by 
the Sigma Tau Gamma pledges. 



GriUette Jewelers 

Home of the 
Keepsake Diamond kings 

We are now handling Fraternity, 
Sorority and Varsity DROP LETTERS 

Watchmaking & Engraving 
a Specialty 



582 Front Street 



Phone 352-3166 



Your Quality Jeweler 



Campus Beauty Finals Set For Dec. 4; 
SGA Sponsors Contest In SU Ballroom 



Preliminaries for the annual 
Lady of the Bracelet Pagent are 
set for Monday Nov. 21 in the 
Student Union Ballroom. Judges 
will limit the present field of 60 
contestents to 20, and finals sche- 
duled for Dec. 4, in the ballroom. 

Only the contestants, judges, 



and Lady of the Bracelet commit- 
tee may attend the preliminaries, 
but the finals will be open to the 
public. 

The contestants were nomi- 
nated- by residents of dorms on 
campus. This annual pageant is 
sponsored my the NSC Student 
Government Association. 




On Campus 

(By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!", 
"Dobie GiUis," etc.) 



with 
MaxShulmai] 



FOOTBALL FOR SHUT-INS 

At next Saturday's football game while you are sitting 
in your choice student's seat behind the end zone, won't 
you pause and give a thought to football's greatest and, 
alas, most neglected name ? I refer, of course, to Champert 
Sigafoos. 

Champert Sigafoos (1714-1928) started life humbly on 
a farm near Thud, Kansas. His mother and father, both 
named Walter, were bean-gleaners, and Champert became 
a bean-gleaner too. But he tired of the work and went to 
Montana where he got a job with a logging firm. Here the 
erstwhile bean-gleaner worked as a stump-thumper. After 
a month he went to North Dakota where he tended the 
furnace in a granary (wheat-heater). Then he drifted to 
Texas where he tidied up oil fields (pipe-wiper). Then to 
Arizona where he strung dried fruit (fig-rigger). Then 
to Kentucky where he fed horses at a breeding farm (oat- 
toter). Then to Long Island where he dressed poultry 
(duck-plucker) . Then to Alaska where he drove a delivery 
van for a bakery (bread-sledder). Then to Minnesota 
where he cut up frozen lakes (ice-slicer) . Then to Nevada 
where he determined the odds in a gambling house (dice- 
pricer). Then to Milwaukee where he pasted camera 
lenses together (Zeiss-splicer). 

Finally he went to Omaha where he got a job in a tan- 
nery, beating pig hides until they were soft and supple 
(hog-flogger). Here occurred the event that changed not 
only Champert's life, but all of ours. 

Next door to Champert's hog-floggery was a mooring 
mast for dirigibles. In flew a dirigible one day, piloted by 
a girl named Graffa von Zeppelin. Champert watched 
Graffa descend from the dirigible, and his heart turned 
over, and he knew love. Though Graffa's beauty was not 
quite perfect— one of her legs was shorter than the other 
(blimp-gimper)--she was nonetheless ravishing, what 
with her tawny hair and her eyes of Lake Louise blue and 
her marvelously articulated haunches. Champert, smitten, 
ran quickly back to the hog-floggery to plan the wooing. 

To begin with, naturally, he would give Graffa a pres- 
ent. This presented problems, for hog-flogging, as we all 
know, is a signally underpaid profession. Still, thought 
Champert, if he had no money, there were two things he 
did have : ingenuity and pigskin. 

So he selected several high grade pelts and stitched 
them together and blew air into them and made for Graffa 
a perfectly darling little replica of a dirigible. "She will 
love this," said he confidently to himself and proceeded to 
make ready to call on Graffa. 

First, of course, he shaved with Personna Super Stain- 
less Steel Blades. And wouldn't you? If you were looking 
to impress a girl, if you wanted jowls as smooth as ivory, 
dewlaps like damask, a chin strokable, cheeks fondlesome, 
upper lip kissable, would you not use the blade that 
whisks away whiskers quickly and slickiy, tuglessly and 
nicklessly, scratchlessly and matchlessly ? Would you not, 
in short, choose Personna, available both in Injector style 
and double-edge style? Of course you would. 




So Champert, his face a study in epidermal elegance, 
rushed next door with his little pigskin dirigible. But 
Graffa, alas, had run off, alas, with a bush pilot who spe- 
cialized in dropping limes tc scurvy-ridden Eskimo vil- 
lages ( fruit chuter). 

Champert, enraged, started kicking his little pigskin 
blimp all over the place. And who should walk by just 
then bus Jim Thorpe, Knute P.ockne, Walter Camp, and 
Pete Rozelle! 

They waiked silently, heads down, four discouraged 
men. For weeks they had been trying to invent football, 
but they coi'ldn't seem to find the right kind of ball. They 
tried everything— hockey pucks, badminton birds, bowling 
balls, quoits— but nothing worked. Now seeing Champert 
kicking his pigskin spheroid, their faces lit up and as one 
man they hollered "Eureka!" The rest is history. 

• * • ©H«7. Mu 3holm.il 

Speaking of itickt, if you've got any about your pres- 
ent thave cream, try Bi\rma-Shave, regular or menthoL. 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



Twelve Seniors End Careers Against SLC 



The resurgent Demon grid- 
ders close out their 1967 sea- 
son tomorrow night in Ham- 
mond, against the Lions of 
Southeastern Louisiana Col- 
lege. The all-important Gulf 
States game will have a defi- 
nite bearing on the final 
standing in league action. 

The Lions always seem to 
come-up with a top-notch quarter- 
back, and this year is certainly 
no exception. Leading the Hom- 
mond-based crew is Dan Brewer, 
a 170-pound junior. He leads the 
GSC in total offense, and is the 
only league player who has sur- 
passed the magic 1000-yard mark 
this season in that department. 

Southeastern is a pass-minded 
squad again this year. Lion quar- 
terbacks have put the pigskin 



into the air 223 times through 
their first eight games, as com- 
pared to only 134 Demon aerials. 
On the receiving end of most of 
the Lion pass attempts is their 
outstanding end, Duane Floyd, 
who has snared 38 passes for 541 
yards and three touchdowns. 

Overall team balance seems to 
be SLC'c biggest hurdle. Head 
Coach Pat Kennelly's charges 
have given-up an average of 19 
points a game thus far, which 
scoring an average of 18 markers 
a game themselves in the process. 

Going iinto their season finale, 
the Southeastern team has a 
record of 3-5. The losses have 
come at the hands of such power- 
ful squads as McNeese, Lamar 
Tech, Southern Mississippi, 
Northeast State and Southwest- 
ern. They have defeated La. 



Tech, Trinity University and Pen- 
sacolo Navy, who incidently had 
a completely recovered Roger 
Staubach at the controls. 

The always potentially awe- 
some Demon offense came out of 
its hibernation last week as the 
mighty Purple and White rambl- 
ed for 449 yards total offense, 
197 of them by the seldom-used 
Demon air routes, and the re- 
maining 252 comes over the con- 
ventional rushing attack. 

Fabulous Demon halfback Vic 
Nyvall from Kilgore, Texas, has 
rushed for 550 yards on only 84 
carries, for an amazing average 
gain of 6.2 yards every time he 
gets his hands on the ball. The 
sophomore running back also 
leads the squad in pass receiving, 
with 18 catches good for aiuaddi- 
tional 296 yards. 



In the throwing department, 
the duaj quarterbacking situa- 
tion revolving around senior Mal- 
colm Lewis and junior Don Gui 
dry, has not lived up to its pre- 
season expectations, primarily be- 
cause the pass was rjot really 
needed, but showed enough trac- 
es of its 1966 form to make a 
reasonably safe assumption that 
it may get another workout to- 
morrow against the Lions. Thus 
far. Demon field generals have 
lofted the ball 134 times an(l 
completed 60 of them for a total 
gain of 899 yards. This is an 
average of 111.6 a game, or 14.8 
a completion. 

Of course the main weapon in 
the Demon attack remains the 
tremendous rushing, ball-control 
offense. The running-backs have 
eaten-up a total of 1,994 yards 
on the ground this season, for an 



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average combined offense of 
361.6 yards a game. Meanwhile, 
their opponents have consumed 
234.1 average yards. 

Right behind Nyvall in the 
rushing statistics are Guidry, 
394; Kenny Callens, 309; Al 
Phillips, 224; and Barry Fresh 
with 171 yards. 

The Demon defensive squad 
will be put to a stern test in 
stopping the at times terrific 
Lion offensive machine. Leading 
the charge against enemy ball 
carriers will be superlative Ger- 
ald Malley, Paul Alonzo, Mike 
Creel and the redoubtable line- 
backed, Lester Latino. Having to 
content with Brewer's aerial cir- 
cus will be Dick Concilio, Ronnie 
Whatley, Sammy Clifton, David 
Smith and John Boogaerts. 

The annual Demon-Lion affair 
has a history of wild and some- 
times erratic contests. Only a 
year ago tomorrow did the lowly 
Lions suddenly rise-up against a 
heavily favored Demon crew and 
almost pull an upset of major 
proportions. 

The Demons were only one 
game away from their first un- 
defeated, untied season since 
1939, when the upstart Hammond 
gang came into the Demon's own 
back yard and promptly built a 
24-14 half-time lead. Only some 
late-game heroics by Malcolm 
Lewis and Don Gudry saved the 
day for the Purple and White. A 
last quarter touchdown pass by 
Guidry, and Lewis' two field 
goals, the winning one coming 
in the final minutes of play, 
turned the tide of defeat. 

Twelve Demon footballers will 
be singing their "swan song" in 
collegiate football competition in 
tomorrow's game, they are: 
Lewis, Clifton, Melvin Johnston, 
M. Creel, Bill Stevens, Malley, 
David Dawson, Jimmie Woods, 
Bob Foster, P. Creel, Louis Rich- 
ard and David Lovich. 



Younger Garners 
First Place Win 
In N. O. Tourney 

George Younger and Jimmy 
Weems garnered first and second 
place in the College Division of 
the New Orleans Badminton Tour- 
nament held at Tulane University 
last weekend. 

Younger captured first place 
honors defeating two Tulane en- 
tries in the semi-finals, and by 
topping teammate Weems in the 
final round of play. 

Younger also took second place 
in the Open Division of the tour- 
nament losing to present national 
champion Jim Poole of New Or- 
leans. 

Future tournaments on the ag- 
enda this year are the Dallas 
Open, the Louisiana Open in Nat- 
chitoches, and the Mid-South Col- 
lege Tournament in Memphis, 
Tenn. 

Intramural Golf 
Set For Nov. 27 

Intramural golf has been re- 
scheduled to begin Nov. 27 and 
will be played on three consec- 
utive Mondays. 

Roy Gentry, Instramural Direc- 
tor, also announced that Paddle 
Ball has been rescheduled to be- 
gin Thursday, Nov. 30. Entry 
deadline is Tuesday, Nov. 28, in 
the Intramural Office of the Men's 

Basketball dominated Intramur- 
al sports last week with 43 teams 
involved. Three different play- 
ing areas are being set aside for 
the games. 

Action takes place Monday 
through Thursday in the Coli- 
seum, Men's Gym. Games begin 
at 6:30 Monday and Wednesday 
evenings; while action starts at 
5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days. 



Friday, November 17, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 1 



From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 

Rebirth of the Demons 

Last Saturday's 24-9 romp over a good University of 
Southwestern Louisiana squad marked the return of the 
temporarily dormant Demon offensive machine. The strange 
Gulf States Conference thriller had all the markings to make 
it perhaps the weirdest football contest the GSC will ever see. 

There was never any doubt about the supremacy of the 
Purple and White warriors, as they seemed to be a team pos- 
sessed from the very outset of the game. The incomparable 
Viv Nyvall had perhaps his best night as a Demon as he 
personally accounted for 139 yards net rushing. Nyvall simp- 
ly could not be contained, but he did have tremendous sup- 
port by the always-tough Demon blocking corps. Turning in 
fine games among the offensive lineman were David Dawson, 
Phillip Creel, Kenny Ferro and Bill Stevens. Also showing 
a lot of finess among the blocking backs were Barry Fresh 
and Kenny Callens. 

Officiating Stinks! 

After watching the contest played in Lafayette, definite- 
ly the home of the Ragin Cajuns, the average spectator 
might have felt a little queasy about the atrocious officiating 
displayed throughout the game. 

For a while it appeared that the Demons would have to 
beat both the USL squad and the officials too. Our never- 
say-die gridders were penalized 13 times for 149 yards. Mean- 
while, the Cajuns were checked only five times for a mere 
25 yards. We admit that a team could be conceivably guilty 
of 149 yards of infractions, but it is highly doubtful. What 
these penalties were given. For instance, both squads had to 
loose a touchdown because of some infraction. However, 
the strangest moments came after USL's legitimate TD, and 
another when the Demons were driving for a score in the 
second half. The Cajun's fine placement specialist, Roy Pen- 
dergraft, missed on the PAT try, but someone was guilty of 
offsides, so USL decided to go for two points. This effort 
fell short too, but alas, seconds after the play had actually 
been completed, a flag was thrown, and the Demons were 
charged with a personal foul. So, the Cajuns tried again from 
a little closer to the goal, but this try too failed, and they had 
to be content with nine points. 

Many times it appeared that the "officials" could not 
actually agree among themselves just what infraction had 
been committeed, much less how it should be handled if it 
was committeed. Case in point here was the refs' version of 
the Key-Stone Cops. Kenny Callens had apparently dropped 
a pass in the USL end-zone. One official however, ruled that 
he had caught the ball (which of course if he had would have 
been a touchdown), but had fumbled, the ball rolling out to 
the two, whereupon it was pounced on by a couple of USL 
players who were sort of milling around while the officials 
attempted to explain this strange phenomenon. First, one of 
them signaled USL's possession, then the others decided to 
follow the leader. However, they decided to analyze this 
problem in depth for a while, and eventually changed the 
railing to an incomplete pass, which gave the ball back to 
the Demons, which is where it belonged anyway. 

Game Goes On and On and On . . . 

The unique encounter also set a record for the amount 
of time consumed by a single contest. The affair lasted more 
than three hours, which can also be placed in the officials 
hands. They moved with all of the speed of a man going to 
the gallows in handling the various problems which arose 
throughout the game. 

Season Finale Time Again With the Go-Go Lions 

It doesn't really seem like a year has passed since the 
Southeastern Louisiana College Lions came up to Demon 
Stadium in an almost successful attempt to upset the then 
number-one-ranked Purple and White. It was a truly fasci- 
nating game which wasn't decided until the final minute 
of play when Deacon Lewis connected on a game winning 
field goal which gave the Demons a 27-24 advantage with 
about 45 seconds remaining. The Lions received the on-sides 
kick-off to prevent a run-back, called time-out, and had time 
left for one or two plays. They naturally went to the air, and 
threw two incomplete passes. However, on what would have 
been the last play of the game, a Demon defender committed 
pass interference against a Lion received, with one second 
remaining to be played, thereby stopping the clock auto- 
matically. Many of the players thought that the game was 
over, and were leaving the field as ecstatic fans raced out 
to greet their heroes. But of course the officials had to clear 
the playing field, and give SLC its one more chance. They 
were now apparently in field goal range, and they meticulous- 
ly set-up for just that. Their kicker was only a freshman, but 
he walked onto the field to undertake a monumental task. It 
was a fifty yard attempt, and everyone held their breath as 
the ball first appeared to be good, but then skittered off to 
the left. A perfect season had been preserved. 

What's That? A Perfect Slate? 

Our guest picker last week some how or other picked 
every game right and therefore, Wes T. Bank returns again 
to repeat his performance. Of course he advises not to take 
his point spreads. 
NSC 36, SLC 30 
Southwestern 9, McNeese 7 
La. Tech 20, Northeast 13 
LSU 27, Mississippi State 19 
Tulane 21, Virginia 13 
New Orleans 23, Philadelphia 14 



Demons Dump Ragin Cajuns 24-9 
To Gain Second Place In GSC 



Remembering two con- 
secutive upset losses to Troy 
State and McNeese, the De- 
mons roared back into the 
win column and Gsc conten- 
tion Saturday night by hand- 
ing the Bulldogs of USL a 
convincing 24-9 setback be- 
fore a capacity crown in Mc- 
Naspy Stadium. 

The triumph was monumental 
in keeping the Demons' title 
hopes alive pushing their GSC 
season record to 3-1, and allow- 
ing them to pull within one game 
of league-leading McNeese. 

Although stymied by powerful 
defenses for the past two weeks, 
the potent Demon offensive at- 
tack seemed to come alive in the 
Cajun contest managing 449 
yards total offense. 

The Demon backs scrambled 
for over 252 yards over the dusty 
turf, while quarterbacks Don 
Guidry and Malcolm Lewis com- 
bined efforts in completing 14 
of 28 passes for 197 markers. 

The Bulldogs drew first blood 
in the contest late in the first 
period after gathering in a De- 
mon punt and running the ball 
back to their own 45. 

Tailback Jim Kemp ripped up 
the middle of the line for 12 
yards to the 33, and came back 
on the next play for 10 more. 

After failing to garner a first 
down on the next series of plays, 
the Bulldogs summoned kcking 
specialist Roy Pendergraft who 
booted a three-pointer through 
the uprights giving USL a 1:29 
left in the first period. 

The Demons retaliated with a 
score of their own late in the sec- 
ond period after being dlriven 
deep into their own territory by 
USL punt. 

Vic Nyvall gained three yards 
on the first play, then took the 
handoff from Guidry on the 
following play and slashed over 
right tackle to romp 75 yards for 
the score. Malcolm Lewis booted 
the extra point to make the score 
7-3 in favor of the Demons. ...... 

After an exchange of punts, 
the Demons added to their night- 
ly point total by annexing six 
more points on the scoreboard. 

Quarterback Guidry moved the 
surging Demons to the Cajun 25 
by hitting Kenny Callens with 



a 13 yard aerial. Three plays 
later, Guidry hit end Steve Gas- 
pard with a second Demon scor- 
ing pass that made the score 13-3. 

Lewis added the extra point 
and made it 14-3 with 11:30 left 
in the second period. 

The sluggish Cajun offense 
picked up momentum late in the 
second stanza traveling on the 
passing arm of quarterback 
Mickey Bergeron. 

Bergeron moved the Cajuns 
down the field in five plays hit- 
ting ends Dwight Sevin and Kent 
Finley for important yardage. 

Four plays later, tailback Jim 
Barton took a pitch-out from 
Dickie Mart to go in for the 
score. 

The Bulldogs missed the try 
for the extra point when fullback 
Adrien Mentel was stopped just 
short of the goal line attempting 
for the two point conversion. 

A third Demon touchdown 
came early in the fourth period 
after the Purple and White stop- 
ped a Cajun attempt for a first 
down. 



Guidry picked up 14 yards in 
two carries and then hit Nyvall 
for 26 yards and a first down on 
the Cajun's five. 

On second down, Guidry found 
Nyvall all alone in the end zone 
and Lewis booted the extra point 
to give the Demons a 21-9 mar- 
gin with 14:32 left in the game. 

The Demons added insurance 
points late in the game driving 
down to the Bulldogs fifteen with 
Lewis booting a field goal. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Weightlifting Club will 
hold its third meeting of the se- 
mester at 7 p.m. Tuesday night 
in the Men's Gym to discuss the 
proper techniques of weight con- 
tests. 

Plans and procedures for the 
Intramural weightlifting contest 
will be explained with special 
emphasis put on the methods for 
successful lifts. 

Also discussed at the meeting 
will be suggestions for choosing 
an emblem for the club wind- 
breakers. 




For the best in Christmas gifts 
Shop our entire line of items. 

Sandefur Jewelers 

The Jewlers with 
the DEMON Touch 



117 St. Denis 



Phone 352-6390 



This is Guillet Studio 




We are now showing Potpourri proofs. 
Hours: 3-5 p.m. through Nov. 27th 

Special reduced prices for prints 

No charge for your proofs 



Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Friday, November 17, 1967 




'Amphitryon' Closes Tonight 



COLLAPSING EXHAUSTED into his fraternity brother's arms is 
Intramural track contest winner, Mike Heiball. Heiball, representing 
Sigma Tau Gamma, edged out other cross-country contestents in the 
all-campus contest last week. 

Thanksgiving Menu 

Ibreville and St. Denis Cafeterias' 
Thanksgiving Day Menu 
November 21, 1967 
Relish Tray 

Ambrosia Salad Tossed Green Salad 

Baked Young Tom Turkey 
Cornbread Dressing 
Giblets Gravy 
Cranberry Sauce 

Baker Ham 
Spiced Peaches 
Candied Yams with Marshmellows 
Buttered English Peas 
Hot Rolls Mincemeat Pie 

Ice Cream 
Soft Drinks 
Tea, Milk 

Youth Dies In Campus 
Fire; Companion Held 

The charred body found early 
Monday morning in a burned 
storehouse on the campus was 
identified Wednesday as James 
Wesley Quinn, an 18-year-old 
Natchitoches Negro. 

Dr. Charles Cook, Natchitoches 
coroner, said that the body was 
positively identified by dental 
work and articles found near the 
charred remains. 

Quinn's body was discovered 
by Campus Security Chief James 
K. Lee and officer Warren Mas- 
sia as they were conducting a 
routine investigation of the fire 
which completely destroyed the 
four-room structure around 5 
a.m. Monday morning. 

The house, vacant for about 
eight years, had been used as a 
storehouse for hay for the col- 
lege dairy. Located three-quar- 
ters of a mile from the dairy, 
the building was located on an 
undeveloped section of the cam- 
pus. 

A Negro Natchitoches school 
teacher, James Raymond, who 
was last seen with Quinn Sunday 
night, was arrested and indicted 
for Quinn's murder Wednesday 
by the Natchitoches Parish 
Sheriff's office. Neither Quinn 
nor Raymond are connected with 
the College. 



Gayer Excells In Spotty Cast 



By Frances Toler 

A tale of a God's seduction of 
a mortal, nestled in exquisite 
scenery and accompanied by 
strains of celestial music, forms 
the framework for the College 
Theatre's production of Jean 
Giradoux's classical Greek farce 
"Amphitryon 38." 

The play opens with Danny 
Gayer (Jupiter) and Artie Vis- 
conte (Mercury) perched atop 
a cloud-shrouded Olympus rather 
clinically discussing the delicate 
art of persuading a woman (Alk- 
mena) to capitulate to a man's 
(In this case a god's) more 
earthy passions. 

Gayer, who more than ably 
portrays the highly-sexed deity, 
brings to the Northwestern stage 
a professional finesse that is all- 
too-infrequently witnessed by 
theatre-goers. From his frenzied 
pacing about the stage as he 
crystalizes his scheme to his im- 
passioned beseeching of his "vic- 
tim," Alkmena, Mr. Gayer is 
about as professional as an 
amateur in Natchitoches can be. 

His cohort, the fleetfooted 
messenger of the gods, is, how- 
ever, less fortunate. In his some- 
what dubious attempts to "Natu- 
ralize" his role, Mr. Visconte 
relates the manly art of seduction 
is if he were revealing his favo- 
rite recipe for brownies at the 
monthly meeting of the Ladies' 
Aid Society. 

Also having a rather unfortu- 
nate encounter with the role of 
Alkmena is veteran actress Suzy 
Hames. Miss Hames never quite 
gets into the feel of her part, 
as is evidenced by her rather 
insipid muttering during her 
more passionate scenes with her 
husband, Amphitryon. 

Her spouse (John Josephson), 
on the other hand, succeeds a 
bit better, and gives quite a 
good performance as the Greek 
general who wins not only on the 
battlefield but in the bedroom. 

The supporting female role of 
Leda is filled by promising fresh- 
man Sheri Saleff. Unfortunately, 
one wonders if Miss Saleff uses 
her wildly flailing hands to give 
credibility to the doubtful tale 
that Jupiter came to her as a 
swan, of whether she was trying 
to dry her nails at the last 
minute. 

With his toga aflutter in the 
the breeze, Kurt Simpson fills 
the supporting male role of 
Amphitryon's true and loyal 
servant Sosie. 

Tony Rispoli as the trumpter 
gets more than the lion's share 



Broadmoor 
Gift and Furniture 



Quality gifts for all occasions 

Shop early for your BEST Christmas 
selections 



Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Phone 352-5756 



of guffaws as he begins his wierd 
gyrations in preparing to blow 
his horn. Rispoli bring to the 
stage the sounds of Thebian cul- 
ture with more-than-a-generous 
smattering of Jersey accent. 

Blowing and blustering on 
stage as the fearless warrior is 
graduate student John Braden, 
who does an admirable job of 
inciting the citizens to arms — or 
anyone else within hearing dis- 
tance. 

Completing the cast are Linda 
Newman as Nevetza, Ann Stout 
as Kleantha and Leah Luckett 
as Echo. 

However, the greatest perfor- 
mance was given weeks before 
curtain time by director Frank 
Magers and his student crew. The 
use of lighting effects, scenery, 
and instrumental music culmi- 
nate in an extremely well-exe- 
cuted technical production. 

Quite evident also is that 
Magers has had his actors delib- 
erately underplay some of the 
more ribald lines so that they 
can be caught by only the most 
discerning ear. Whatever his rea- 
soning, Magers succeeds in turn- 
ing out a tasteful performance 
of a play that could be interpret- 
ed in some quarters as a romp 
through the gutter with Jupiter 
and friends. 

Outstanding for its technical 
production, its earthy humor, and 
quite good use of underplay, Mr. 



CANE THEATRE 

710 Second St. 
Natchitoches, La. 
Phone 352-2922 



Friday and Saturday 



THE WILD ANGELS 




"...LOOK OUT- 
''they're COMING! 

©1966 American International Pictures 



c ^pgS c PIHA c TE 

DneMcOre BSLJohn GwSodEml MaiyAmMDUey 

* UNIVERSAL PICTURE 



Sunday and Monday 



Jaiwes 

mm 

BtiUCeBMORDS 



WdSnnis 

#3 



leafittoesL I I HcifflfiscGPs' 



Tuesday and Wednesday 




Mager's production of Giradoux's 
farce is probably the most ur- 
bane and sophisticated produc- 
tions of the season. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 




Box Office Opens 
| Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

i — Admissions — 

Adults — 1.00 
[ Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 

Tonight and 
Saturday 



Dean Martin 
Starring in 
Both— 
'THE SILENCERS' 
and 

'MURDER'S ROW 
Both In Color 

Sun - Wed 

Jim Hutton 
| 'WHO'S MINDING 
THE MINT' 
Color 



CHIEF , 

D R I VE -lN s , 



Last Ti 



John Wayne 
Kirk Douglas 



'WAR 



WAGON' 
Color 



Saturday 



Raguel Welch 
"ONE MILLION 
YEARS B. C." 
— Co-Feature — 
Frank Sinatra 
"ASSAULT ON 

A QUEEN" 
Both In Color 

Sun - Mon • Tues 

One Performance 
Only Starting 
At 7:00 P. M. 
"THE TEN 
COMMAND- 
MENTS" 
Color 

Bucknight 

"BRAVADOS" 
and 

"HOW TO STEAL 
A MILLION" 
Both In Color 




Tonight, Thursday 



Boo The Villian, 
Cheer The Hero Vo i. lvi-no. u 
At Melodrama 




urrent 



s 



auce 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 




The Davis Players will present 
their first annual melodrama, 
"Dirty Work At The Crossroads," 
in the Student Union Ballroom 
today and tommorrow at 8 p.m. 
The Hero. . . The story, first 
produced in 
1890 and re- 
cently rewritten 
by David Simp- 
son, features 
t| h e standard 
melodrama plot 
in which the vil- 
M' ' 3K lain attempts t0 
9k IwiHlte marry the hero- 

Wm M 8 H acquire her fa- 
91 Sm illlllllllli ther's property. 

Richard BushneU Nancy Mart j n> 

vice president of the Davis play- 
ers will direct the production 
with assistance from speech fac- 
ulty member Mark Pettaway. 

Bruce Kalman will don the vil- 
lain cloak rivaling Richard Bush- 
ell who portrays The vuiata. . 
the hero. Both 
will attempt to 
gain the atten- 
tions of Phyllis 
Jackson, who 
will play the 
heroine. 

Othem mem- 
bers of the cast 
are Martha Lou 
Carroll as theg 
mother, Karenl 
Dowty as the! 
French M a i-d, Bruce Kaiman 

Mrs. Kerry Bradford as Mrs. 
Asterbilt, and Linda Newman as 
Leonie. 

Also included in the cast will 
be Barbara Gresham as the 
villainess, John Braden as the 
country rustic, while Judy Price 

. . .The Heroine plays a child. 

Jim O'Quinn 
will provide mu- 
sic with piano 
accompaniment. 
Pam Clark has 
been named set 
chairman while 
Alice Ann Con- 
ner will be in 
charge of a- 
r r a n g e ments 
and concessions. 
Soft drinks 

Phyllis Jackson and popCOTD 

will be sold, and audience parti- 
cipation is encouraged. 




THE SERENDIPITY SINGERS added the finishing touches to the annual Christmas Festival celebration 
held in Natchitoches last weekend. The nationally famous singing group entertained the student body in 
Prather Coliseum Saturday night by providing a variety of well-chosen songs, and delighted the audience 
with a light-hearted atmosphere coupled with humorous interpetations of television commercials and 
famous entertainers. 




Students Vote Tuesday 

Twelve Vie For 
Mr., Miss NSC 




Twelve seniors have been 
nominated for the titles of Mr. 
and Miss NSC the highest honors 
which can be awarded students 
at the college 

Mr. and Miss NSC Will be 
selected during a campus-wide 
election Tuesday in the Student 
Union. 

In the event of a tie, a runoff 
election will be held Dec. 14. 

College President Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick will announce the win- 
ners at the annual Christmas 
Assembly which begins the holi- 
days. It is set for Dec. 20 in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium. 

Six nominees will appear on 
the ballot for the Mr. NSC Award 
and six others for the title of 
Miss NSC. 

Nominees were selected last 
spring by campus organizations 
and dormitory residents. 



Orchestra Plans Full 
Concert SLate Friday 



Competing for the title of Mr. 
Northwestern are John R. Ram- 
sey Jr.., Shreveport; mathematics 
major; David E. Butler, Alexand- 
ria electronics major; Danny Bob 
Turner, Shreveport physical edu- 
cation major; Dennis K. New- 
bury, Shreveport math and elec- 
tronics major; Jere Daye, Shreve- 
port governmen t major, and 
Walter C. Pikher, Alexandria 
music major. 

Nominated for the Miss NSC 
title were Shirley Kay Dickie, 
Natchitoches physical education 
major; Norma Louise Foshee, 
Mansfield home economics major; 
Lynda Lee Lawrence, Alexand- 
ria social science major; Frances 
Toler, Crowley English major; 
Annette Wallace, Pineville pri- 
mary education major, and Sue 
Peterson, Norfolk, Va. primary 
education major. 

Mr. and Miss Northwestern 
State College are chosen on the 
basis of service, leadership and 
character. Only seniors are eligi- 
ble. 



Johnson Selected 
Outstanding Prof 
By Student Vote 

Joseph W. Johnson, assistant 
professor of business education 
and office administration, has 
been selected as Professor of the 
Year. 

In an election sponsored by the 
Potpourri, students named John- 
son as the professor who best 
exemplified the qualities of lead- 
ership and teaching ability. 

A graduate of Northeast Lou- 
isiana State College, Johnson re- 
ceived his master's degree from 
Northwestern and has been a 
member of the faculty since 1956. 

Johnson, who will be featured 
in this year's Potpourri, is a 
native of Henderson, N. C. and has 
worked with the American Na- 
tional Insurance Co. of Monroe. 
Before joining the college staff, 
Johnson served seven years in 
the U. S. Navy. 

He is president of Louisiana's 
chapter of the National Associa- 
tion of Accountants and a past 
president of the National Associa- 
tion of Accountants. He also 
holds membership in numerous 
professional organizations. 



Thousands 

See City 

Christmas 

Festival, 

Serendipity 

Concert 

By Charles Skinner 

A stately procession of 
bands, floats , El Karubah 
motorcycles and suicide cars, 
clowns, beauties, and politici- 
ans cut a wide swath through 
downtown Natchitoches Sat- 
urday initiating the Forty- 
first annual Christmas festi- 
val. 

The parade was only the first 
in a series of events comple- 
menting the yearly premier of 
the Christmas lights which were 
climaxed Saturday night with the 
performance of the Serendipity 
Singers 

Among the other preliminaries 
was a performance by the Caddo 
Ski-Bees whose antics delighted 
thousands of spectators. The NSC 
Band and Chorus furnished more 
opportunities for entertainment 
although their music was largely 
drowned out by the throngs of 
milling spectators. 

The floats participating in the 
parade were judged according to 
certain specific points and three 
representing NSC were placed in 
the top bracket. Copping a first 
place in the competition was the 
entry of the Beta Sigma Phi en- 
titled Christmas Around the 
World. The ROTC group made a 
double coup for the day ranking 
first a second place in the float 
division of the parade and then 
taking the independent spirit 
trophy awarded by the Student 
Government Association at inter- 
(See Festival, page 5) 



The Natcfatbdhes-Northwest- 
Symphony Orchestra, under the 
baton of Dr. Joseph Carlucci, 
will present its first formal 
evening concert of the season in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium on 
Friday evening at 8:00 o'clock. 

Sponsered by the Nathitoches- 
Northwestern Symphony Soc- 
iety, an organization made up of 
culturally-minded citizens of 
Natchitoches and now in its sec- 
ond year of existence, the orches- 
tra will feature an outstanding 
guest piainst for this initial con- 
cert, Edward Kilenyi. 

Kilenyi was born in Philadel- 
phia of Hungarian parents and 
gave signs of his musical talent 
at the age of three. His father, a 
famous musician of the early 
1900's, supervised his early mus- 
ical education. Then, at the age 
of eleven, Kilenyi went to Buda- 
pest to study with the great 
Hungarian composer-pianist, Ern- 
st von Dohnanyi. There followed 
a series of triumphal appear- 
ances as a recitalist and as a 
soloist with orchestras through- 
out Europe. 

Kilenyi made his American de- 
but at New York's Town Hall in 
1940 and was enthusiastically re- 
ceived by the critics. He was 



well known through Columbia 
Masterworks recordings for his 
performances of the music of 
Chopin and Liszt. During World 
War II he joined the army as a 
Private and finished as a Cap- 
tain in Military Intelligence. His 
final assignment was to super- 
vise the denazification and re- 
building of the musical life of 
Bavaria. 

For his appearance in Natch- 
itoches, Kilenyi has selected the 
Piano Concerto No 5 in E-flat 
major, the so-called "Emperor" 
concerto, by Beethoven. The or- 
chestra will open the program 
with the Overture to "Orpheus 
in the Underworld" by Offen- 
bach; "Come, Sweet Death," a 
sacred song by J. S. Bach; Marche 
Slave and Waltz from the ballet 
"The Sleeping Beauty" by Tsch- 
aikowsky. 

Admission will be by season 
ticket or college student I.D. 
cards. Season tickets will be a- 
vailable at the door at the fol- 
lowing prices: S10.00 for the fam- 
ily ticket, $5.00, individual; and 
$3.00, pre-college students. Sing- 
le admissions for this concert 
will also be available at S3.00 for 
adults and $1.50 for pre-college 
students. 



Field Of Twenty 

Fowler Gets 'Bracelet' 
Eleven c»//e§ es In Beauty Competition 

Attend SUSGA 
Here Friday 



Delegates from eleven 
state colleges and universi- 
ties and one Texas college 
convened on campus here 
Friday and Saturday for the 
fourth annual Louisiana SUS- 
GA Conference. 

Approximately one hundred 
and thirty-fivt Student Union 
and Student Government repre- 
sentatives attended the conven- 
tion which featured special guest 
speakers, well prepared discus- 
sion groups and luncheon. Cli- 
maxing the two-day meet, hosted 
by Northwestern, was the annual 
city Christmas Festival, parade 
and fireworks and Serendipity 
Singers concert. 

Northwestern was chosen last 
year at the state conference as 
the host organization when Scot- 
ty Maxwell, SGA treasurer, was 
elected Vice-Chairman of the 
state SUSGA. Maxwell, who pre- 
(See SUSGA, page 8) 



The Student Union Ballroom 
provided an elegant setting, and 
Master of Ceremonies Wayne 
Meachum, unfailing wit as Mar- 
cie Fowler was chosen Lady of 
the Bracelet at the annual pag- 
eant last Monday night. 

Marcie, a freshman and a 
native of Natchitoches, was rad- 
iant in her turquoise gown as she 
stepped forward to accept the 
bouquet of roses and traditional 
bracelet from Pam Rushing Kees, 
last year's winner. 

Marcie had already captured 
the talent award for her presen- 
tation of a dialogue by Edgar Lee 
Masters. 

The other members of the 
court chosen Monday night were: 
First runnerup, Candace Faust, 
a freshman, and recepient of the 
award for the swimsuit competi- 
tion; second runnerup, Linda 
Craft, a sophomore, whose vocal 
medley from "The Sound of 
Music" merited her a place 
among the talent finalists; third 
runnerup, Susan Murrell, a senior 
from Port .Sulphur, ; _and fourth 
runnerup, Jane Holland, sopho- 
more, and talent finalist. 



The other five finalists chosen 
by the judges presented at the 
Pageant were, Karen Alston, Gai 
Hooper, Sharon Parker, Paula 
Shaw, and Brenda Wilson. 

Besides talent and swimsuit 
competition, the girls were also 
judged on their beauty and poise 
as they appeared in their evening 
gowns, as well as on responses 
they gave to random questions 
posed to them individually. 

Serving as contest judges Mon- 
day night were, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jamie Willingham, Mrs. Virgil 
Rogers, Mrs. Gloria Yarbrough, 
Mrs. Dixie Ware, Herb Park, and 
Geo Gallian. 

Entertainment was provided by 
the Choralettes, Pam Kees and 
Meachum, who sung a selection 
of ballads. 

Special guest Monday night 
was Cecilia Shea, former Miss 
Shreveport and first runnerup at 
the Lady of the Bracelet Pageant 
last 'year. Miss Shea presented 
the swimsuit and talent trophy 
awards. 

Coordinating the SGA sponsor- 
ed program were Student Govern- 
ment Members Garland Riddle 
and Susan Borderlon. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 




/-3 



on our tcma vou use K 

KEGUU\TION "W\T AMP LIKE IT ! 



Letter t The Editor 



Dear Editor, 

As the much worn football is 
put into storage for a few months 
and many golden memories are 
filed in the catalogue of greats 
to be recalled when the past is 
desired over the present, let us 
not forget that with the end of 
one season another follows. Yes, 
about this time every year, the 
cobbwebbs are cleared away and 
the old basketball is taken out 
on the hardwood for a few drib- 
bles and perhaps a few quick 
swiches through the nylon. The 
phenomenon appears to happen 
all over the country. Northwest- 
ern State College is not to be 
left out by any means. N. S. C. 
owns some of those round balls 
and certainly has the players 
capable of handling them too! 

As implied above, the name of 
the game is basketball and, un- 
fortunately, some people seem to 
forget this phase of the sports' 
program on campus. But it does 
definitely exist. One of the pit- 
falls of basketball is that one 
team has to lose; for this reason, 
many hardworking teams have 
slaved, sweated, and put forth 
all the strength they could mus- 
ter to win a game only to be 
shunned and harrassed by their 
(fans?) when fate put them on 
the losing end. 

Does this situation sound fa- 
miliar? Yes, I was afraid it is 
all too familiar. For you see, it 
is Northwestern State ■ College I 
am speaking of. 

Last season, some of the basket- 
ball greats at Northwestern were 
forced to leave their college 
basketball careers behind them 
lacking the much deserved grati- 
tude they earned playing and 
sacrificing for their school. 

Current Sauce 

ESTABLISHED 1914 

Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks. In 
the fall and sprine, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 

Member of the Associated Collegia' e 

Press 

Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 

Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim CVQuinn Assoc! Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson Staff Artist 

lerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

fleporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann. Danny Boutwell, Gail Dooley, 
Ray King. Gidget Maxwell. Jack Mont- 
gomery, Garland Riddle. Shirley Rut- 
ledge, Alton Sanders, Ed Thompson, 
Thomas Turner and Virginia Ann Wo- 
oten. 



David Clark and Jerry McLau- 
rin will be remembered by some; 
they should be remembered by 
all. Remembered for their never 
tiring effort to make basketball 
at Northwestern an event to be 
applauded and not one to be 
scorned and respected. Not only 
these two seniors, but the whole 
team did their best but could 
see no thanks anywhere they 
tfurnied. True, they lost more 
than they won; but as has been 
demonstrated in other sports' 
endeavors, sometimes things don't 
click and we are handed a big 
disappointment. 

Let's wipe the slate clean and 
begin a whole new season and 
games of our Northwestern State 
College team. The football team 
had a good season. Could this 
won-lost record have been in- 
fluenced by the high attendance 
and spirit of the fans? Did they 
play a little harder because they 
knew somebody cared and was 
enthusiastically supporting them. 
These questions deserve a little 
thought, but whatever ansker is 
arrived at, the football team did 
have a good season and should 
be justly commended. 

Win or lose, lets show our 
N. S. C. basketball boys that 
Northwestern has fans for foot- 
ball and basketball alike. 

Sharon Jeanette Bartlett 

Summer Jobs 
Mushroom For 
U.S. Students 

Over 50,000 summer jobs open 
to college students are listed in 
the new 1968 Summer Directory 
just off the press. 

Employers throughout the 
United States and Canada who 
list their summer job openings 
include resorts, summer camps, 
national parks, summer theaters 
restaurants, ranches and business. 
They invite applications now. 

There are 12 more summer jobs 
available than last year. Salaries 
are higher in many jobs — an 
increase of $100 to $200 for the 
season. Camp counselors, resort 
workers and office help continue 
to be in greatest demand. Scuba 
divers, ham operators, special 
education students, and fly-tying 
and origami instructors are am- 
ong many others needed. 

"Summer Employment Direct- 
ory" may be ordered by mail; 
send $3 to National Directory 
Service, Dept. C, Box 32065, 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45232. Mark 
"rush" for first-class mailing in 
December, 
prush ||elo .hsioii 



A New Threat To Campus Freedo m 
Prompts State Colleges To Ask . . . 

Whatever Happened To 
The First Amendment? 



In its unceasing effort to remain, as 
always, a bastion of conservatism, an 
outpost of states rights and the Utopia 
of idealist Americanism, the honorable 
Louisiana State Legislature has created 
a new rule to help students in all state- 
supported colleges and universities de- 
cide what type of speakers they, the stu- 
dents, would like to see and hear. 

This is to be efficiently enforced by 
means of Act. No. 7 of the Louisiana 
Legislature which states that no state 
funds may be used at any state institu- 
tion of higher learning to " . . . finance, 
sponsor, support, foster or conduct any 
program, or hire any speaker, or support 
any campus activity or organization that 
is communistic or atheistic, or to be used 
for any purpose for the benefit of, or in 
connection with any communistic or 
atheistic activity." 

The state law-makers must have been 
very proud of this new law, seeing it as 
a great boost and a show of strength 
for Americanism. They must also have 
been pleased with the clever wording, 
by which the rule is not, theoretically, 
a ban against speakers, but merely a 
ban against using state or school funds 
to have them talk, hold seminars, etc. 
However, anyone who bothers to look 
twice at these statements will immedi- 
ately realize that since all state schools 
are operated with state monies (which 
come primarily from the students,) and 
that no speaker will consent to talk just 
for the fun of it, the ban that isn't a ban 
quite definitely is just that. 

One of the greatest aspects of our U. 
S. Constitution is that it allows anyone 
and everyone the privilege of peaceable 
assembly and free speech. Is not then 
Act No. 7 a clear violation of these two 
principles? 

What it boils down to, apparently is 
that our dear lawmakers have taken a 
paternal attitude toward each and every- 
one of us by attempting to shield us from 
the inherent evils of communism and 
atheism. 

The legisators contend, and rightfully 
so, that communism is a direct threat to 
the United States and its myriad of 
ideals. We are involved in an unrelenting 
ideological war with the communist 
world — yet a basic military strategy is 
to know your enemy. It is true that if 
an individual desires an insight into 
the teachings of Marx, Engels, Lenin and 
company, he may do so by searching 
out their works in most any library. 
However, there is a distinct difference 
in reading and interpreting these works 
and listing to a contemporary com- 
munist expound his working philoso- 
phies.. 

Fred Tannehill, a staunch proponent of 
this bit of legislation lectured to a com- 
bined audience of Government 200 and 
Government 450 students earlier this 
month. One of his primary points was 
that "education is the key to the future." 
And even Mr. Tannerhill would have to 
agree that free thinking and objective 
analysis are basic to the education pro- 
cess. It follows that our state govern- 
ment is attempting to stifle our educa- 
tional potential for the future by denying 
us a chance to see and hear a communist 
or otheist in action. The legislature, cur- 
ious as it may seem, has taken on a 
markedly totalitarian attitude in its 
fight against totalitarianism. 

It seems that the undaunted <>tate 
congressmen believe that if something 
is hidden away somewhere, as if it 
doesn't really exist, then It isn't a prob- 
lem at all. They should realize that when 



Amendment One Of 
U.S. Constitution 

Congress shall make no law respecting an 
establishment of religion, or prohibiting the 
free exercise thereof; or abridging the free- 
dom of speech, or of the press; or the right 
of the people peacably to assemble, and to 
petition the Government for a redress of 
grievances. 



Act No. 7 Of The 
La. Legislature 

(Editor's Notes This is Section One of the 
five-section Act passed June 12, 1967 by the 
Louisiana State Legislature.) 

Section 1. Any monies from state funds 
appropriated, allocated, or proposed to be used 
by any institution of higher education shall 
not be used or made in any way available to 
finance, sponsor, support, foster or conduct 
any program, activity, seminar or any other 
function, or hire any speaker, or support any 
campus activity or organization that is com- 
munistic or atheistic, or to be used for any 
purpose for the benefit of, or in connection 
with any such communistic or atheistic act- 
ivity. 



something has been surpressed, invari- 
ably it becomes that much more attrac- 
tive — and more lucrative when it again 
rises to the surface, often in a violent 
fashion. 

Further, the law seems to imply 
serious doubts on the part of the officials 
about the intellectual level of Louisi- 
ana's college students. Could one lec- 
turer sway a notable number of people 
to his line of thinking — could he prove 
that communism is that wonderful? Bet- 
ter than Americanism? Are our legis- 
lators worried that our American heri- 
tage and governmental structure is real- 
ly so weak that one speaker, or 1000 
speakers could destroy it? Let us hope 
not. 

And turning to the application of the 
act to atheistic speakers, there can be 
absolutely no justification for this. Athe- 
ism is not a threat to the security of the 
United States. Here again the state is 
encroaching upon the individual's right 
to listen to and consider any philosophy 
he chooses — including an atheistic one. 

Perhaps the most important issue here 
is whether or not a state can overrule 
the U. S. Constitution. Last year the 
U. S. Supreme Court threw out a similar 
New York state law as being unconstitu- 
tional. It is conceivable that a court test 
of this act would bring a like result. 

Moreover, if the state sees fit to ban 
communists, and atheists, what group 
will be next? Perhaps other political or 
enthnic factions whom the legislators 
deem undersirable. 

A number of LSUNO students have 
begun an organized protest against this 
legislation. The ball is also rolling at 
LSUBR, USL, McNeese, Southern and 
Grambling. If you are genuinely con- 
cerned with working toward a repeal 
of this reactionary, despotic law, write 
your state Representative(s) and Sena- 
tors). Let's exercise our Constitutional 
rights, and let our voices be heard by 
those in power. 

That is Americanism in its most vital 
form. 



1 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



RejleetiaHd On A ViiU 
*1a A Madkauie 



Page 



by Frances Toler 

(Editor's Note: This feature was 
written by Frances Tolar, who 
was a member of an NSC Psy- 
chology Class which, as part of 
its curriculum, toured Central 
Louisiana Mental Hospital in 
Pineville.) 

The attendant at the gate stop- 
ped us and we stated our busi- 
ness. We then drove slowly on — 
past the administration build- 
ings — past the greenhouses . . . 

Strange . . . Central didn't ap- 
pear to be a lunatic asylum. The 
air didn't reverberate with the 
shrieks of madmen. In fact, it 
rather looked like a college cam- 
pus in Anywhere, USA, and we 
could have been friends from a 
lonesome freshman's hometown 
up for the day to cheer him up. 

But we weren't. We were mem- 
bers of a college psychology class 
and we had come to qawk at 
those whom society brands as 
"different," "abnormal" or 
"strange." Those whom problems 
now overwhelmed them . . . 

We browsed rather lazily 
among the shelves filled with 
health "Establishment." Freud, 
Menniger, Allport, Jung, Adler — 
all were there. 

Suddenly a voice pierced the 
silence. 

"The superintendent is wait- 
ing for you in the conference 
room of the administration build- 
ing." 

We crossed the street and en- 
tered the building. The click of 
metal taps on terrazzo echoed 
down the hall. We took our seats 
and waited.' 

Presently, an immense smiling 
man entered the room. He was 
Turner Bowen, director of train- 
ing at the hospital. He immedi- 
ately began telling us about Cent- 
ral: 3,000 admissions a year . . . 
ninety percent return within a 
year . . . 2,500 average daily 
census . . . more figures . . . more 
statistics . . . 

Then Mr. Bowen rather non- 
chalantly revealed our itinerary 
for the day. He made it sound 
like we were members of a gar- 
den club who had come to in- 
spect some society matron's hy- 
brid roses. As an afterthought, 
he added that Mrs. Smith, a 
psychiatric nurse, was waiting 
for us at the main receiving 
unit. 

When we entered the general 
receiving unit, we were greeted 
by Mrs. Smith, a gentle woman 
with a warm smile. Funny. She 



didn't seem to have the glazed 
eyes of a veteran who had fought 
many battles with enraged 
patients. Rather, she looked like 
the sort of lady who goes home 
after Sunday services and fries 
chicken for her family. 

She gestured toward a room 
which was partitioned off by 
curtains of a rather doubtful 
shade of red. Above the entrance 
were stamped the words "Ex- 
amining Room." But how do you 
examine mental illness? What 
are the symptoms? Do you get 
a rash? Does one sneeze fre- 
quently? 

Finally, she showed us an in- 
significant little black box label- 
ed Electro-Shock Therapy. She 
indicated that the purpose of 
this therapy was to induce a 
certain amount of forgetfulness 
in cases of severe depression. 

As we entered the unit with 
Mrs. Smith, an old man shouted, 
"Saint Peter must have opened 
the gates and let all the angles 
out of heaven." 

Once inside the large unit, the 
men were seated about a tele- 
vision set. A Negro boy slept on 
a beige couch: — oblivious to our 
presence. A red-headed man sat 
alone, gazing absently out the 
window. A pouchy old man with 
a card labeled "diabetic" pinned 
to his shirt crossed our view. 

Impressions . . . more impres- 
sions . . . We were walking in 
that narrow valley between nor- 
malacy and abnormalacy . . . 
More faces. Some happy . . . Some 
sad . . . Some hopeful . . . Some 
despaired . . . All pieces of hu- 
manity, some gnarled more than 
others . . . 

Then we toured the occupa- 
tional therapy units. Cheery, hap- 
py places that were filled with 
the handiwork of the patients. 
Baskets, paintings, weaving . . . 
Each activity designed to help 
the patient resume his rightful 
place in society. 

After lunch, we stopped at the 
women's geriatrics ward. The 
ladies were getting ready for a 
party being given for them by a 
volunteer group. Hands reached 
out for us as we walked among 
the patients. Hands looking for 
friendship — smiles that said 
"please love me." 

The day ended and we were 
ready for our return to "nor- 
malacy." But then, what ever 
does that word mean? Who de- 
fines it? 

"Turn again, turn again, turn 
once again, the fools of the cos- 
mic circus are men." 



Chicago Public Schools 

will have a representative 
on campus 
December 15, 1967 

For information about certification, 
procedures and teaching opportuni- 
ties, arrange for appointment at: 

College Teacher Placement Office 



Faculty 
Briefs 



Computer Service To Analyze National 
Scholarship Competition For Students 



Three college faculty members 
have been named to state offices 
in the Louisiana Teachers Asso- 
ciation and in affiliated organ- 
izations. 

Mrs. Donald Graham, assistant 
professor of speech has assumed 
the presidency of the Louisiana 
Speech Association. 

The head of the college's Spe- 
cial Education Department, Dr. 
Michael Cousins, was elected vice- 
president of the Special Educa- 
tion Section of LTA. 

Howard P. McCollum, director 
of the North Louisiana Supple- 
mentary Education Center here, 
was named vice-president of the 
Science Teachers Association. 

Oliver Hargrove, coordinator of 
physical sciences for the supple- 
mentary education center, was 
presented with the award as the 
Outstanding Science Teacher at 
the 73rd annual convention of the 
LTA last week in Bossier City. 



A new computerized scholar- 
ship-search service for freshmen, 
sophmores and juniors is now 
being utilized by the Financial 
Aid Office. 

Working in cooperation with 
the North American Educational 
College, the college offices will 
have access to a computer which 
matches students' qualifications 
to more than 700,000 scholarships 
and grants. 

Information on scholarships 
and grants totaling more than 
$500 million has been program- 
med into the computer, which 



matches forms turned in by 
students. 

Jack Prough, fiancial aid direc- 
tor, pointed out that last year 
some $30 million in college schol- 
arships went unclaimed because 
there were no applications. 

After students complete the 
computer forms for tie avail- 
able aid, the coomputer types out 
an individualized report to the 
student telling him of the 
sources of aid for which he qual- 
ify and gives information on how 
to apply for the grants. 



Two members of the college 
music faculty attended the an- 
nual convention of the Louisiana 
Music Teachers Association held 
Nov. 2-4 on the Newcomb Col- 
lege campus in New Orleans. 

Representing the college were 
Dr. Paul Torgrimson, professor of 
music, and Dr. Joseph B. Car- 
lucci, department head. During 
the three-day meet, Dr. Torgrim- 
son was appointed to the newly 
organized State Certification 
Board of LMTA which will exam- 
ine and certify qualified private 
piano teachers in Louisiana. 

Dr. Carlucci presided over sev- 
eral meetings as Chairman of the 
Wind Instrument Section and 
served as chairman of the Reso- 
lutions and Necrology Commit- 
tees. Dr. Carlucci was also elected 
to the office of Vice President 
for the next two-year term. 



Broadmoor 

Gift and Furniture 



Quality gifts for all occasions 

Shop early for your BEST Christmas 
selections 



Broadmoor Shopping Center 



Phone 352-5756 



Guess 

who forgot 




As Gulliver discovered, falling asleep at the wrong time can be downright embarrassing, 
even for a Big Man on Campus. Ah, well, it can happen to the best of us. Your eyelids 
droop. Your attention wanders. You're drowsy all over. Quick! Take a couple of NoDoz. 
NoDoz really works to help you stay alert. Keep some handy, in your i^ ^ ^msmm 
pocket, your medicine chest, the glove compartment of your car. *-M 
NoDoz. It's non habit-forming. Take NoDoz. Show 'em they can't 
keep a good man down. 

THE ONE TO TAKE WHEN YOU HAVE TO STAY ALERT. 




MP 



*1 



tragi i. 



itiE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 6, 1' 




NEW INITIATES of the Iota Lambda Sigma national Education honorary fraternity are pictured here after 
their initiation recently in the SU. Inducted into the honor group were, left to right, Dr. Charles Becker 
Richard Wilson, Paul Peyton, Edward Domangue, Roy Lee, Richard Lindsey, Jerry Freeman and Joseph 
Cheng. - 

Phi Kappa Phi National Honor 
Fraternity Names New Members 

Twenty-three College students Seniors and second-semester Cole and Alan Pinkus 
have been elected to member- j uniors must have achieved an School of Arts and Sciences- 
have been elected to member 0V erail 3.3 grade average. Juniors Nancy Cole, Stephen Gunn 
ship m Phi Kappa Phi, national must rank in the top five per . Way ne Horn, Susan Michael, and 
honor society for academic excel- cent of their class, and seniors Robert Nida. 
lence. must rank in the top 12 percent School of Business— Dale Be- 

Seniors, graduate students and of their class. Not more than 10 han l^nda Fae Johnson, 
second-semester juniors in any percent of the candidates for Scho ° l of Education — Mike 

t LiT * em f^ er J umo ™ .™ a ny prr,H,.»tirtn mav hp olprtpd Churchman, Karen Cuny, Connie 

™L w y 6llglblC • * 0r r > e ,: h 00 Foshee, Ritk Kemp, Barbara Tau- 

membership m the honor society. Initiation ceremonies for the 23 zi Ca ^ lyn peyton RiehJ 

Election to membership in Phi students elected this week will Mary Stiles, Linda Willis, and 

Kappa Phi signifies the high be Jan. 5, at 6:30 p.m. in the Sharon Wilson, 
scholastic attainment and good Student Union building. School of Nursing— Callie Min- 

character of the college students Elected from the Graduate ter, Pamela Quails, and Mary 

selected - School were Larry Arthur, Lewis Sanders. 

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE FOR FALL SEMESTER 1967 if. . M ■>■ .. / 

Monday, January 15, 1968 Viet Nfllll Writer S 

8:00- 10:30 A.M 10:00 MWF t IB n I I I I 

^f- 2:30 P M All Sections of English 100,101 Talk ReSChe€IUI6CI 

o:oU - b:00 P.M 8 00 TTS 

T ,,„ i,„ . '.'#»,« Craig Spence, special corres- 

8 0n lO-^n A m V ' Januar * 16 ' 1968 P° ndent f ° r th * Mutual Broad- 

19-nn o$Sȣ 2:00 MWF casting System who was sched- 

q on" ,in!i' 11:00 TTS uled to speak here last Wednes- 

<i:«5U- b:U0F.M 8:00 MWF day, has postponed the address 

Wednesday, January 17, 1968 until December 15 because of 

8:00 - 10:30 A.M 10 00 TTS illncss - 

12:00 - 2:30 P.M 3-00 MWF The Colle g e ' s Assembly Series 

3:30 - 6:00 P.M. . i 30 TT Committee, headed by Wayne 

T l„„j„, ~7~ Branton and Mrs. Edith Cote, has 

fi-nn in-sn a m y ' J noary 18 ' 1968 set the addres * for Dec. 15 at 

1 Snn S'52 £ ™ 9:00 MWF 10 a m - in the Fine Arts Auditor- 

12.00- 2:30 P.M : 12:00 TT ium. 

3:30 -6:00 P.M 1:00 MWF In addition to his national 

Friday, January 19, 1968 broadcasts, Spence, who was once 

8:00- 10:30 A.M ...... 1100 MWF ex P el 'ed from Cuba, has written 

12:00 - 2:30 P.M. qqq TTS extensiv ely on Vietnam for the 

3:30- 6:00 P.M. 12 00 MWF North Atlantic Newspaper Alli- 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1968 ance , K He s P en j u se ^ral 

8:00 - 10:30 AM. S-nn TT months in Vietnam and has been 

12:00- 2:30 P.M. 4:00 MWF years" correspondent for 10 



This is Quillet Studio 




We are now showing Potpourri proofs. 
Hours: 3-5 p.m. through Nov. 27th 

Special reduced prices for prints 

No charge for your proofs 



Championship Team 

Steve Miller Now 
Leads Demon Lifters 



by Sid Turner 

The sport of weight- lifting 
can be compared to the library 
on date night — everyone knows 
it's there, but nobody really 
cares. Steve Miller cares. About 
weight-lifting, that is. 

Miller is from Shreveport, 
majoring in Industrial Arts. He is 
also the mainstay of the School's 
Weightlifting Club and has some 
very definite opinions on the sub- 
ject. 

Along with the other members 
of the club, Steve is preparing 
for competition with the other 
colleges, "although we haven't 
really gotten completely organiz- 
ed yet." Last year the Club com- 
peted in a national meet at USL 
and at the Southern Champion- 
ships in New Orleans where 
they took two first and two 
second place trophies even 
though they didn't have a com- 
plete team. 

According to Steve there is no 
organized practice, instead each 
member practices when his sch- 
edule allows. For Steve, this is 
two and a half to three hours, 
five days a week. 

He started lifting weights 
while he was attending Wood- 
lawn High School in Shreveport. 
"I weighted about 135 pounds 
and when I went out for football, 
I really got clobbered", Steve 
said. A friend encouraged him 
to start lifting in order to gain 
weight and strength. The effort 
showed and Steve played football 
for three years at Woodlawn and 
help(ed his team to the State 
Championship. 



At 5 ft. 10 in. and 195 lbs. 
Steve competes in the Middle 
Heavyweight class. Although he 
does many types of lifts, his 
favorites are the press, bench 
press, and squat. He has lifted 
285 lbs. in the press, 395 lbs. in 
the bench press, and 450 lbs. in 
the squat. 

There are a lot of fallacies 
about weight-lifting. Many people 
think that weight-lifters are so 
muscle bound that they move 
slowly and don't have the coor- 
dination of more slender athletes. 
Steve told us that some of the 
best athletes in terms of speed 
and aility lifted weights regularly 
and pointed-out Wilt Chamber- 
lain as an emphatic example. 

Steve said that weight-lifting 
required an enormous amount of 
concentration, and technique is 
really more important than brute 
strength. He said that a person 
must have complete concentra- 
tion on what he is doing before 
he can make a good lift, and 
psychology is a very important 
factor. 

When asked why he lifted 
weights, Ste^e couldn't give a 
definite answer. "I guess there 
are many reasons, but it is hard 
to give a good explanation", he 
said, "I suppose everyone has a 
different answer". 

Steve said that he would cer- 
tainly recommend weight-lifting 
to other students, but added that 
any form of physical activity 
and the proper amount of sleep 
could have a good effect as well. 
And believe it or not he eats in 
the school cafeteria! 



Minutes of SGA 



November 20 

President Newbury called the meet- 
ing to order. Roll was caUed. Minutes 
were read and approved. Absent were 
Vestal and Ferrera. 

President Newbury read a letter of 
resignation from Mitzi Brown in which 
she recommended Margie Hoelz to fill 
her office. Charles Skinner was asked 
to bring a recommendation next week 
concerning the vacancy. 

It was brought to the attention of the 
group that Ellen McPherson, chairman 
of the songfest committee had had to 
resign from school as a result of a 
back injury. Kirk moved we send Ellen 
McPherson some; flowers. Ramsey 
seconded. Question called by Gray. Mo- 
tion carried. 

Rispoli read the proposed question- 
naire to be filled out by NSC students. 
Questions were discussed and correc- 
tions and additions were made. Rispoli 
stated that Mr. Joe is a very nice man 
and because of his efforts much has 
been done to benefit the students in 
the cafeterias. 

Maxwell moved we accept Rispoli's 
committee report and questionnaire 
and it be placed under the discretion of 
the AWS and AMS for administering 
the questionnaire. Seconded by Town- 
send. Butler called for question. Mo- 
tion passed. 

Music is now in both cafeterias. Se- 
lection of the music is by students 
bringing their own records to be play- 
ed. 

Installation of non-paying phones in 
the student union and cafeterias can- 
not be done due to previous misuse. 
The telephone company has refused 
to place these phones in the student 
union. 

The travel board will be ready on 
Tuesday, November 21, at noon for 
use of the students. 

Rispoli moved that the student ser 
vices committee be given ID cards to 
prove they are members of the com- 
mittee which would give them author- 
ity to look into various services render- 
ed to the student. Seconded by Kirk. 
Question called by Gray. Seven affir- 
mative, eleven negative, motion de- 
feated. Dean Fulton instructed the 
group to go to Mr Wright because he 
is in charge of all these organizations. 

It was reported that changes have 
been made in the speakers for the 
SUSGA conference. Welcome letters 



have been sent to the various SGA 
and advisee schools. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

It was stated that money for assemb- 
lies comes from artist series in the 
amount of $1,000 per year for assemb- 
lies. Investigation for several different 
paths that can be taken is underway 
to find a solution for additional funds 
and improved assembly program. 

Gray moved the meeting be adjourn- 
ed. Seconded by Kirk. Motion carried 
Meeting adjourned. 

November 27, 1967 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. The group said the 
Pledge of Allegiance and had prayer. 
The minutes were read and approved 
Roll called. Absent were Butler, Wicks 
Kirk, and Sellars. Late was Kevill. 

President Newbury announced the 
SGA will have supper at the Presi- 
dent's home on Tuesday night Decem- 
ber 5, at 6:00 p.m. The regular meet- 
ing for the week will follow. 

Baker said that the Howdy Days are 
tentatively scheduled for the week of 
Dec. 12-18. The possibUity of having a 
dance was discussed. 

Rispoli reported for the Student Ser- 
vices Comm. stating the questionnaire 
would be distributed to the students 
during the coming week. He announced 
phones have been replaced in the stu- 
dent union. 

Burns said the AMS is doing much 
work and meetings are in progress 
concerning various problems. It was 
announced that the decision to begin 
Christmas decorations on campus has 
been put off until next year because 
of lack of time at the present. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

Old business consisted of Skinner 
recommending Eddie Simmons to fill 
the vacancy of Junior Sec. Treasurer. 
The group discussed the recommenda- 
tion. Landry moved the recommenda- 
tion be accepted. Seconded by Burns. 
Ramsey called for question. Three 
affirmative. Eighteen opposed. Motion 
failed. 

It was mentioned that the lights for 
the "N" on top of the Fine Arts build- 
ing have not all been working. Sugges- 
tion was made to have these fixed 
because of all the visitors coming to 
the campus. Newbury said this would 
be taken care of during the week. 

Gray moved the meeting be adjourn- 
ed. Seconded by Fowler. Motion carri- 
ed. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 



Billid 

House of Beauty 

Ask one of our 5 operators how to register for the falls 
and wiglets to be given FREE on Christmas week. 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 



1 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



AMS Plans Tutoring 
Program To Aid Men 



AMS President Henry Burns 
has announced the establishment 
of a student committee to plan 
a college tutoring system at 
Northwestern. 

The committee, headed by 
Lake Charles sophomore Jerry 
Moomau, has issued survey sheets 
to students to determine prime 
subjects for tutoring service. 

Results of the survey indicated 
a definite and immediate need 
for tutoring services in the bio- 
logical sciences, business, En- 
glish, math, and chemistry. 

The Associated Men Students 
will not have sufficient time to 
put the system into operation 
this semester, Burns says, but 
arrangements for the student 
tutors are being made with each 
department of the college, and 
night classes for the purpose of 
reviewing finals are being plann- 
ed. 

In early spring tutoring ser- 
vices for all classes which have 
indicated a need for such services 
will be offered. By the end of 
the spring semester, Burns esti- 
mates, tutoring services will in- 



clude all college subjects. 

Tutors for night classes, meet 
ing twice a week, will include 
professors, graduate assistants, 
student teachers, and exceptional 
students who are recommended 
by department heads. 

Several methods of financing 
the tutoring programs have been 
proposed by the AMS, which 
hopes to make primary use of 
its own funds. Alternate sugges- 
tions include utilization of funds 
from the student financial aid 
office, supplementary depart- 
ment funds, and a minimal 
charge to the students making 
use of the service. 

Burns has asked the student 
body to "cooperate with the next 
memorandum," which will con- 
cern the financing of the pro- 
gram. He and Moomau stressed 
that the success of the program 
rests with the students, and that 
its operations will be, the AMS 
believes, beneficial to the entire 
academic system. 

Moomau's committee is com- 
posed of Skipper Newton, Glen 
Barnette, and Steve Prime. 



Fourth Annual Neptune Water 
Show To Open Tomorrow Night 



The Neptune Club will present 
its fourth annual water show to- 
morrow and Friday night at 7:30 
in the Natatorium. 

This year's theme will be "The 
Realm of Christmas Spirit." 
Swimmers will perform various 
solos, duets, and team numbers 
to the tune of Christmas music. 

Featured at the event will be 
the members of the diving class 
and the synchronized swimming 
class. Several of these swimmers 
have been enrolled in the classes 
only since the beginning of this 
semester. 

The program, formerly under 
the direction of Miss Joyce Hil- 
lard, will be entirely a student 
production this year. The stu- 
dents are responsible for the 
choreography, scenery, and co- 
ordination of the show. 



Susan Day will direct the pro- 
gram with the assistance of Nep- 
tune Club members Claudia 
Neal and Lin Bordelon. Sonny 
Miles will serve as Master of Cer- 
emonies. 

Students performing in the 
water show are: Sherlyn Seihan, 
Jackie Smith, Pam Carmichael, 
Kristin Roy, Ellie Younger, Jane 
Milward, Suzanne Willis, Sheryl 
Smith, Nora Redmond, Tookie 
Bruckhaus, Connie Dawson, Don- 
na Lindsey, Nancy Sublosky, Liz 
Gimbert, Suzanne Garcia, Susan 
Scott, Judy Parks, Mary Anne 
Welch, Kathy Lawrence, Tess 
Arieux, Richard Martin, Wayne 
Strickland, Kieth Ducharme, Dan 
Shepard, Rusty Rilgus, Tim Bak- 
er, Ricky Ellington, Larry Vestal, 
Lionel Meyer, Larry Lieux, Bern- 
ie Walker, Richard Jowers, Tom- 



Festival— 

(Continued from page 1) 

mission at the Serendipity Sing- 
ers performance. Third place was 
the entry of the Les Amis called 
Zip Code 71457. 

The lighting was immediately 
preceded by the fireworks dis- 
play where ground-to-air and 
ground-to-ground fireworks were 
detonated. The show took place 
as goggle-eyed spectators "oohed" 
and "aahed" attempting to watch 
the two displays at once, afraid 
they would miss something. 

Presiding over the day's cele- 
bration was Miss Merry Christ- 
mas, Carla McCain, whose red 
Christmas suit made everyone 
feel just a little more festive. 

Among the dignitaries in the 
parade were representative 
Speedy 0. Long and Senator 
Russell Long. 

One of the new features of the 
pageant was the singing Christ- 
mas Tree which boasts lights 
varying in color and intensity 
with the type of Christmas music 
being played from nearby speak- 
ers. 

The whole Christmas Festival 
is sponsored by the Natchitoches 
Chamber of Commerce which 
has the momentous job of ap- 
pointing judges, setting up dis- 
plays, and doing all the little 
thankless jobs that cannot be ig- 
nored in an enterprise of this 
sort. Leonard Fowler is president 
of the Chamber of Commerce. 

The Christmas Festival has 
grown from a mere idea in 1936 
to one of the most spectacular 
Yule Festivals in the country 
today. Spectators visiting from 
all over Louisiana and other 
states, as well, were called upon 
to remember that Christmas is 
for Christ. Carols, fireworks, and 
multicolored lights seem at times 
an inadequate expression of the 
debt we owe, but the externals 
are often paled by the glow in a 
person's heart on Christmas. 



my Jowers, Tom Foshee, Bill 
BaskervQle, Ronnie Manning, 
Gary Mitchell, Rusty Bevil, Tom- 
my Boone, Vince Gallant, Robert 
Guillet, Becky Levell, Nancy 
Thomas, Bobby York, and David 
Aaron. 



It's What's Happening 



Wednesday, December 6 

Davis Players Melodrama, SU Ballroom 
7 p.m. 

Thursday, December 7 

Intercollegiate Tutoring, SU 308, 313, 

315; 6 to 10 p.m. 
Davis Players Melodrama, SU Ballroom, 

7 p.m. 

Kappa Delta Pi Meeting, SU 320, 

6:30 p.m. 
Basketball Game— NSC vs Southern 

Mississippi, Prather Coliseum, 

7:30 p.m. 

Friday, December 8 

Annual Neptune Water Show, 

Natatorium, 7:30 p.m. 
Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony 

Concert, FA Auditorium, 8 p.m. 
Navy Fly Team, SU Lobby, All Day 

Saturday, December 9 

Chorus Rehearsal, FA Auditorium and 

Little Theatre, all day 
Basketball Game— NSC vs Springhill 

College, Prather Coliseum, 7:30 p.m. 



Kappa Sigma Formal, SU Ballroom, 
8 p.m. 
Sunday, December 10 
Christmas at Home Reception, Varnado 

Drawing Room, 3 to 5 p.m. 
Kappa Sigma Founders Banquet, 
SU Ballroom, 5 p.m. 
Monday, December 11 

Christmas-at-Home, Varnado, 8 a.m. to 

5 p.m. 

SGA Meetiny, SGA Room, 6 p.m. 
Tuesday, December 12 

Choral Rehearsals and Concert, 

FA Auditorium, all day 

Backwards Soc Hop, Men's Gymnasium, 

6 p.m. 

P.E. Majors Club Christmas Banquet, 
SU Ballroom, 6:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, December 13 

SLTA Meeting, SU 320,6:30 p.m. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Reception, SU 269- 
270, 6:30 to 9 p.m. 

Movie, "Guns of Navarone," SU Ball- 
room, 7 p.m. 

Psi-Si Frolies, Little Theatre, 8 a.m. 



ENGLISH RECEPTION 

All English majors and minors 
are invited to attend a reception 
in the Home Economics Drawing 
Room 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday 
night. Hosted by Sigma Tau Del- 
ta, a national honorary English 
fraternity, the reception will en- 
able all English minors and ma- 
jors to meet and talk with mem- 
bers of the College's English de- 
partment. 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 




-J^iiocialed lAJomen Student* of 
Iflorllxweilern Stale dodeae 
Present 
Sounds of Christmas 
dirli tmaA -at-Jdome deception 
SbecemLr 10, 1967 3:00-5:00 p.m. 
2)rawinij f^oom of %/arnado 



Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Recruiters fnom five school 
areas and a representative of 
Keesler Air Force Base will be 
in the placement office next week 
to conduct employment inter- 
views. 

Thursday, a representative of 
the Port Arthur, Texas school 
district will discuss employment 
possibilities with prospective 
teachers. 

Tuesday, education majors will 
be able to discuss employment 
with a representative of the Chi- 
cago school district, and the Bu- 
reau of Indian affairs. 

A representative of Jefferson 
Parish Schools will be in the 
placement office Wednesday to 
interview prospective teachers 
interested in teaching in the New 
Orleans area. 

Also on Wednesday, James Har- 
mon of Keesler Air Force Base 
near Biloxi, Mississippi, will dis- 
cuss employment with physics, 



Golf Is Prime 
College Sport 
In Intramurals 

Intramural golf, which began 
Dec. 4, is in full swing, and will 
continue for the next two Mon- 
days. 

Power weight lifting begins to- 
morrow at 5 p.m. Deadline for 
registration is Tuesday, Dec. 5, 
in the upstairs of the Men's Gym. 

The next scheduled event is 
Basketball Free Throw, which be- 
gins Thursday, Dec. 14. Registra- 
tion will be at the Men's Gym 
and entry deadline is Tuesday, 
Dec. 12. 

Pool tournaments will be held 
later in the semester. 

electronics, math or chemistry 
majors. 

Appointments for these inter- 
views may be made by calling the 
college placement office in the 
Student Union, Ph. 357-5621 or 
357-5622. 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 
Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE AT UN2TED S STORE 




EVERY DAY IS SALE DAY AT UNITED! 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 



* » 







DOUGIE WATTS a sophomore from French Settlement High School 
will see plenty of action tomorrow night in Prather Coliseum against 
Southern Mississippi. The 5-10 guard is an excellent ball handler and 
good all-around performer. 



From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 




1967 DEMON CAGERS are bottom row (left to righ) Wayne Lee, Allen Posey, Jimmy Stewart, Ronnie 
Haworth, David Pipes, Johnny Janese, Jim Krajefska, and Dougie Watts. Back row (left to right) Peter 
Gary, Jim Peffer, Jerry Masters, Odis Faust, Ronnie Norris, James Wyatt, Robert Willett, Andy Ma- 
rusak, Bill Ragland, Don Ashworth and Skeeter Henry. 

Cagers Open Home Season 
Against Southern Miss. Five 



Coach Tynes Hildebrand's 1967 
Demon cagers will venture onto 
the Coliseum floor for the first 
time this season when they face 
a formidable University of South- 
ern Mississipp five tomorrow 
night at 7:00. 

Pre-season rankings indicate 
that the Demons may have their 
hands full, since the Southerners 
have been rated high in the wire 
service polls, and according to 
coach Hildebrand will be "big, 
tough, and hard to score upon." 

The Southerners bring six re- 
turning lettermen and three sen- 
iors with them, and will also have 
two former high school all- 
americans to add to their team 
depth. 

Pacing the Mississippians are 
Steve Campbell, a 6'5 forward, 
Brice Thornberry, a 6'2 guard, 
and Billy Edkins who holds down 
the terminal post. 

Last season the Southerners 
finished the season with a 16-9 
mark, and failed to garner a 



conference crown since they are 
an independent. 

Coach Hildebrand remarked in 
an interview last week, that in 
order for the Demons to secure 
a victory they would have to put 
forth an all-out effort to stop the 
scoring threats of the Southern- 
ers. 

Hildebrand indicated that the 
smaller Demons may have to run 
more and utilize the fast break 
offense in order to score on the 
taller Southerners. 

Hildebrand stated the Demon 
basketball fans may find the cali- 
ber of this year's squad surpris- 
ingly different as compared to 
last season's cagers. 

"Last year we controlled the 
ball on the boards, but would 
lose games because of poor shoot- 
ing and improper ball handling, 
however, this winter we should 
be improved in all departments, 
and will have a better all-round 
scoring punch." 

Another big asset will be the 



Demon's accuracy in the free- 
throwing department. Last sea- 
son the Demons led the nation 
in free throw percentage, and are 
expected to be accurate from the 
foul line again this year with 
all but three starters returning. 

Last season's comparitive scor- 
es show the Demons and South- 
ern Mississippi ending the season 
even against one another with 
the Southerners taking a 82-70 
win on their home court, and the 
Demons edging out a late sea- 
son 102-99 victory. 

Although still unknown at this 
time, Hildabrand has listed his 
probable starting lineup with Jim 
Peffer and either Dougie Watts 
or Johnny Janeseat guards, 
James Watt at center, and either 
Ronnie Norris), Otis Faust or 
Andy Marusak at the forward 
positions. 

The Demons entertain Spring 
Hill College at the Coliseum 
Saturday night, then travel to 
Houston Baptist Monday night. 



Intramural 



Basketball 
League A 



Standings 



Thafs The Way The Ball Bounces 

The 1967 Gulf States Conference football action closed 
rather ignomiously on November 18, with the McNeese State 
Cowboys backing into the league championship by virtue of 
the Demons faltering defeat at the hands of the unpredict- 
able Southeastern Lions in Hammond. 

Midway into the third period of the Demon-Lion affair, it 
was announced that Southwestern' s Ragin Cajuns had crunch- 
ed McNeese to the impressive tune of 31-6, thereby giving the 
Purple and White a shot at the GSC co-championship if they 
could whip SLC. But the entire second half of the game be- 
longed solely to the super-charged Lions, and the Demons 
hopes frittered-away with the evening, as the ever-surging 
Hammond crew pulled-off to a final score of 26-14. 

Where Did The Demons Go? 

Whatever happened to the Demons in the second half of 
this old grudge game is strictly a matter of conjecture, but 
for our purposes one could almost speculate that the Demon 
gridders didn't even bother to show up (mentally) for the 
last two quarters. Oh, there were men out there on the 
Strawberry Stadium turf in the familiar silver helmets, 
white jerseys and gray pants, but it would be impossible to 
equate them with the gutty band that had romped-over the 
USL team by a 24-9 count, and in the process had to overcome 
the atrocious officials, a less than courteous crowd and a 
number of bad breaks. This game showed the Demon foot- 
ballers in perhaps their finest form. The strength they dis- 
played in this contest typefied the multitude of reasons why 
the squad was picked by most everyone in the state to walk 

See FROM DOWN UNDER, page 8 



Won 


Lost 


BSU No. 1 


1 


2 


Monarchs 


1 


2 


Rapides Rats 


1 




Assassins 




1 


Roho's Follies 




2 


Little Children 


2 




White Team Backs 


1 


1 


Hi's 




1 


Sandy Sinners 


3 




Bobby's Bombers 


1 




Wild Turkeys 




1 


League B 






BSU No. 2 


3 




KA 


2 


1 


Canterbury 




2 


Fo's 


1 


1 


Sigma Tau 


1 


2 


Kappa Sigma 


3 




Phi Kappa Phi 




2 


TKE 




1 


Barbarious Saints 


1 


1 


Dirty Half Dozen 


1 


2 


League C 






BMOC 




3 


Wandering Ones 




3 


Snoopy's Heroes 


2 




Gator Celtics 




2 


C. A.'s Raiders 


3 




Square Roots 




3 


White Trash 


2 




Pink Panthers 




1 


Rejects 


2 




Super Stars 


3 




League D 






Red Snappers 


1 


1 


Big Six 


1 


1 


Stud Field Mice 


1 


1 


Leesville Leaders 


1 


1 


Whitey's Tornadoes 




3 


Absolute Necessities 


3 




Spanky and Our Gang 




1 


Sure Shots 






Why U's 


3 




Hustlers 




1 


Pas Bas Taus 




1 



Date 


Dec. 


2 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


11 


Dec. 


14 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


30 


Jan. 


3 


Jan. 


6 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


22 


Jan. 


27 


Jan. 


29 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


5 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


12 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


20 


Feb. 


26 



DEMON BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 
1967-68 

Opponent 

Georgia Southern 

Southern Mississippi 

Springhill 

Houston Baptist 
* Southeastern 

Stephen F. Austin 

Texas Lutheran 

Centenary 
*McNeese 
♦Northeast 

Louisiana Tech 
*U. S. L. 

Louisiana College 
♦Nicholls 

Southern Mississippi 
♦Southeastern 

McNeese 
♦Northeast 
*Tech 
*U. S. L. 
♦Nicholls 

Houston Baptist 

Centenary 

Louisiana College 
♦Gulf States Conference Games 
Home Games 7:30 p.m. 



Site 

Statesboro, Georgia 
Natchitoches 
Natchitoches 
Houston, Texas 
Natchitoches 
Natchitoches 
Natchitoches 
Natchitoches 
Lake Charles 
Natchitoches 
Ruston 
Natchitoches 
Natchitoches 
Thibodaux 
Hattisburg, Miss. 
Hammond 
Natchitoches 
Monroe 
Natchitoches 
Lafayette 
Natchitoches 
Natchitoches 
Shreveport 
Pineville 



Tomorrow Is Last Chance For Persons 
To Purchase 1967 Season Tickets 

Prices for the ducats are $1^ 



Assistant athletic director 
Glenn Gosset announced last 
week that season tickets sales 
for the 1967 Demon home basket- 
bail contests in Prather Coli- 
seum would terminate tomorrow 
afternoon. 

However, Gosset commented 
that a few choice box seats are 
still available, and that sales had 
been going at a rapid pace. 



for the 13 Demon home games- 
Included on the basketball sched- 
ule this year are six GSC con- 
tests, and games against sue" 
formidable opponents as second- 
ranked USL, and independefi- 
Southern Mississippi. 

The Demon cagers will ope n 
their home court action tomor- 
row night when they face South- 
ern Mississippi at 7:00 p.m. 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 




Demon Football Players Honored 
At Annual Awards Night Banquet 



JIM PEFFER will be one of the starting guards tomorrow night 
when the Demons take the floor against the University of Southern 
Mississippi. The junior from Hempfield, Pa. averaged 3.9 points per 
game last season. 



Four Demon Baseball Players Chosen 
On 1967 NAIA Ail-American Squad 



Head baseball coach Jack Clay- 
ton announced Monday afternoon 
that four players from last 
spring's GSC championship squad 
have been named to the 1967 
NAIA all-american team. 

Cited for all-american honors 
was third baseman Danny Bob 
Turner who was selected for the 
NAIA second team. 

Receiving honorable mention 
were catcher Don Calvert, out- 
fielder Mike Herron and pitcher 
Gary Johnson. 

Turner, who led the GSC in 
hitting; finished the season with 
a .411 mark, collecting 37 hits in 
90 times at bat. 

Calvert wound up fourth in the 
team hitting with a .330 average 
and six doubles to his credit. 

Herron finished the year with 
* -373 average to place second 
P team hitting statics. Herron 
kd the squad in extra base hits 



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with eight homers and seven dou- 
bles. 

Johnson led the GSC in pit- 
ching with a spotless 10-0 record 
striking out 71 batters and 
walking 22 in 75 innings pitched. 

Clayton stated that the players 
were selected by coaches in the 
NAIA southern district. 



Members of the 1967 Demon 
football team, coaches and other 
team personnel were honored 
Thursday night by the Northwest- 
ern Quarterback Club at an 
awards banquet held at the First 
Methodist Church of Natchito- 
ches. 

The annual affair climaxed a 
fall football season in which the 
Demons finished their first sea- 
son under Coach Clen Gossett 
with a 6-3 record, while tying 
for the second spot in the GSC 
with Northeast and USL. 

Vic Nyvall, a sophomore half- 
back from Kilgore, Tex., who 
led the squad in rushing and 
scoring, walked away from the 
banquet clutching the coveted 
Most Valuable Player Award. 

During the season the swift 
back netted 560 yards rushing, 
averaging 5.9 yards in 95 car- 
riers. Nyvall's longest gain from 
scrimmage included a 75 yard 
burst down the sidelines against 
USL. 

Nyvall led the team in pass 
receiving with 20 receptions for 
308 yards and three touchdowns 
and a 15.4 yard average. The 
elusive Nyvall led the team in 
individual scoring with nine 
tonchdowns and a total of 54 
points. 

Nyvall's broken field running 
was also an asset to the Demons 
this fall leading the team in 
punt returns asd kickoff returns. 

Nyvall returned 15 punts for 
326 yards for a 21.7 average, and 
his most electrifying run came 
against Northeast with a 81 yard 
touchdown sprint. 

In the kickoff return depart- 
ment Nyvall ran back nine kicks 
for 179 yards and a 19.8 average. 

Chosen as team captains for 
the season were guard Gerald 
Malley, and quarterbacks Mal- 
colm Lewis and Donald Gudiry. 

Linebacker Lester Latina gar- 
nered the Most Valuable Line- 
man Award leading the team in 
individual tackles. The sopho- 
more linebacker from Warren 
Easton in New Orleans led the 
defense in his first season as a 
starter. 

The other Defensive Award 
went to senior David Smith of 
Bossier City. Smith led the De- 
mon defensive squad with five 
interceptions. 

Centtr Randy Broadnax of Bol- 
ton in Alexandria received the 
Offensive Lineman Award, while 
quarterback Don Guidry of 
Church Point was named top 




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offensive back. 

Guidry placed second in team 
rushing gaining 378 yards for 3.6 
yards Guidry placed third in 
team scoring with three touch- 
downs for 18 points. 

Gerald Malley was the reci- 
pient of two awards during the 
night getting the Demon Award 



and the Most Tackles Award. 

Donald Durham of New Or- 
leans was the top scholar on the 
team with a 3.33 overall average. 
Other awards during the evening 
were the knockdown award to 
Kenny Ferro, and the scout —;uad 
award going to lineman Jim Ruf- 
fin and back Stan Lauland. 



Move Up The Right Way 

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HOWTO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING 



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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 6, 1967 



SGA Sponsors 



Pi Kapps, Tri Sigmas 
Win First Songfest 



Sorority and fraternity mem- 
bers turned out "en masse" for 
the first annual SGA songfest 
last Wednesday in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 

Capturing first place 'in the 
fraternity division was Pi Kappa 
Phi with its version of "O Holy 
Niht" and the fraternity sweet- 
Keart song. Second place was 
awarded to Kappa Sigma. 

In the sorority division of the 
contest, Tri Sigma received top 
honors with a series of sorority 
rush sngs. Delta Zeta received 
second place. 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Sigma Kappa actives will spend 
Saturday in slavery after they 
are auctioned off to the pledges. 
Serving s uctioneer will be Becky 
Messer. Money will be used to fi- 



nnce the pledges' project for the 
fall semester. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

Two men, Bob Maloney and 
Randall Johnson, have been pled- 
ged by Kappa Alpha fraternity. 

Kappa Alpha will also play 
Sigma Tau Gamma tonight in n 
exhibition basketball game at the 
new St. Mary's Gym. The game 
will be played prior to the first 
game of the Indians, semi-pro 
basketball team composed of for- 
mer NSC cagers. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

Three men have Joined the 
pledge class of Sigma Tau Gam- 
ma. They are John Wood, Jim 
Belgard and Bruce Gillet. These 
new pledges joined their broth- 
ers at the fraternity's costume 
ball Friday night prior to the 
Christmas Festival. 







Hi iJ 





THESE SIGMA TAUS donated blood last month at the Natchitoches 
Parish Blood Bank for the benefit of a needy child. Northwestern 
Greeks perform services for a variety of public and social causes. 



From. Down Under— 



and 



Part Time Employment ? ? 



Now and then KNOC Radio has an opening for a part 
time announcer for some of the night shifts or the FM 
shifts. . . or perhaps as weekend announcers. Students 
that might be interested should contact Jim Hawthorn 
at KNOC. Experience is not necessary, as long as voice 
and personality are pleasant. . .diction good, .and espe- 
cially, if the applicant can read out loud smoothly and 
is interested in radio. Only freshman or sophomore stu- 
dents should apply. We are especially interested in 
someone who will be here this summer while in school. 
Applicants should contact Jim Hawthorne by phone: 
352-2353 — between 5 and 6 P. M. Besides earning some 
money, this experience has proven greatly beneficial 
over the years to many students in various fields. 



Debating Team Takes Top Honors 
In Oklahoma PentathaLonMeet \ 



Pentathalon was the name of 
the game last week for fourteen 
college speech enthusiasts at 
Ada, Okla., where the North- 
western team faced 35 college 
and universities from eight 
Southern and Midwestern states 
and came out of the competition 
only five slots down from the 
top of the list. 

In a pentathalon tournament, 
individual entrants must compete 
in five contests in both of two 
divisions (interpretation and pu- 
blic address), and the Demon De- 
bate Squad, participating in a 
grand total of 72 individual de- 
bates, won Excellent rating in 
the Sweepstakes for both men 
and women's divisions. 

Speech teamsters Richard Bush- 
nell, Lyn Hellinghausen, and Mar- 
tha Lou Carroll rated excellent 



(Continued from Page 6) 

away with their second straight GSC championship, 
another undefeated season. 

Now it is time for the coaches and players to do a little 
soul-searching to figure out just what did go wrong, and be- 
gin preparing for "next year." Of course there is nothing to 
be ashamed about concerning a 6-3 season, it was too bad 
that everyone expected just a little more, whether or not they 
had a right to do so. 

In summing-up the year, we will pass along a heartening 
comment overheard in the pressbox in SLC's stadium after 
the contest had ended, between a Lion assistant coach and 
a Hammond reporter, "Well, well . . . we've finally gone 
'Big Time' . . . we've beaten Northwestern." 



in both pentathalons, competing 
in all eight required individual 
events — story telling, poetry in- 
terpretation, dramatic interpre- 
tation, duet reading, impromptu 
and extemporaneous speaking, 
sales-talk, and after-dinner speak- 
ing. 

Speech major Nancy Martin 
earned a superior rating in the 
interp pentathalon. 

The highest rated women's 
team, Janis Suchand and Miss 
Carroll, earned an over-all Excel- 
lent evaluation. Miss Suchand 
also competed in Lincoln-Doug- 
las one-man debates, defeating 
candidates from the University 
of Houston and Stephen F. Aus- 
tin State College. 

In both debate and sweepstakes 
competition the team outscored 
such outstanding schools as Texas 



Christian University, the Univer- 
isty of Texas, Harding College, 
Abilene State, and Baker College 
of Kansas. 



Former SGA Prexy 
Addresses SUSGA 

Former NSC Student Body 
President Sonny Hargrove spoke 
to a delegation of SUSGA rep- 
resentatives Saturday morning 
in the Union, urging the col- 
legiate leaders to be "future- 
fashioners, not people pleasers." 

"Every right has a respon- 
sibility, every opportunity has 
an obligation, and every posses- 
sion has a duty." Hargrove told 
the convention, sounding off in 
favor of the old-fashioned virtues 
of a conservative, capitalistic 
American Society 

Hargrove, who received his 
masters in Business Adminis- 
tration at LSU, spent two years 
as assistant dean of men at Lou- 
isiana Tech and is now studying 
for his doctorate at the Univer- 
sity of Mississippi. 

"It's not IQ, but I will," he as- 
serted Saturday, building his 
case for individual enterprise 
from a stockpile of inspirational 
epigrams and slogans. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Student Louisiana Teacher's 
Association (SLTA) members 
will meet at 6:45 p.m. next Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 13, in room 321 at 
the Student Union. Officers for 
1968 will be elected and plans 
for the SLTA Banquet will be 
discussed. 



One Carat Diamond Ring 




to be given away at 

Sandefur Jewelers 

December 23, 1967 

All NSC students are invited to register. 
No obligations and you do not have to be 
present to win. 

Also available as a CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 

are our NSC charms at Vi price. 

117 St. Denis Phone 352-6390 



While in town stop in and register for the Diamond ring. 



SUSGA- 

sided over the entire convention, 
organized the meet. 

STATE DIGNITARIES 

Dignitaries and government 
officials from throughout the 
state were featured on the two- 
day conference program. Natch- 
itoches Mayor Ray Scott, Louisi- 
ana State Representative Jimmy 
Long and the Rev. Dan Blake 
were all on hand Friday morning 
to officially welcome the SUSGA 
convention delegates. 

Address by Mayor Scott and 
Representatives Long preceded 
the major keynote address by 
the versatile speaker Rev. Blake. 
During the Friday afternoon con- 
ference session, delegates attend- 
*d discussion groups on high 
school recruiting, student dis 1 
count cards, the role and function 
of the SGA and big name enter- 
tainment. 

On Saturday, such notables as 
Congressman Speedy O. Long, 
Charlton Lyons, Sr., Art Thiels, 
College President Arnold Kilpa- 
trick, and former state repre- 
sentative Max Maxwell were 
guest speakers at the closing 
luncheon session. 

The eleven colleges attending 
the meet here last week were 
Centenary, Louisiana College, 
LSU-A, LSU-BR, La. Tech, Mc- 
Neese, Nichols, Southeastern, 
Northwestern, Southwestern and 
Stephen F. Austin. 



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DON 



Box Office Opens 
IE Mon-Fri — 5:45 
| Sat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 

Tonight through 
Saturday 



Paul Newman 
as 

"COOL HAND 
LUKE'' 

("What we've got 
here is a failure to 
communicate") 

in color 

SUN.-MON.-TUES. 

Brought Back by 
Popular Demand 

Lee Marvin 
Burt Lancaster 
Robert Ryan 

"THE 
PROFESSIONALS" 

Also In Color 



Wednesday Buck 
Nite 

Rod Taylor 
"HOTEL" 
— Co-Feature — 
Warren Beaty 
"KALEIDOSCOPE"! 
Both in Color 

Thursday and 
Friday 

Debbie Reynolds 
Dick Van Dyke 

"DIVORCE 
AMERICAN 
STYLE" 
Color 

Saturday Only 

"FANNY HILL" 
and 

'THE AMOROUS 
ADVENTURES OF 
MOLL FLANDERS' 
Color 

SUN.-MON.-TUES. 

James Coburn 
"WATERHOLE 
NO. 3" 
Color 



Wrecked! 



See Page 2 




urrent 



s 



auce 



The Ban! 

See Page 2 



Vol. LVI— No. 15 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 



Increased Appreciation 

Music, Drama, 
Dance Groups 
Well Received 

Three major Fine Arts pro- 
grams drew crowds on cam- 
pus this week, marking an in- 
creased interest in campus- 
oriented entertainment and 
a new ' ndard of quality and 
originality for the perform- 
ing organizations. 

The Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Symphony Orchestra, under the 
direction of Dr. Joseph B. Car- 
lucci, presented its first formal 
concert of the season Friday 
evening with outstanding guest 
pianist Edward Kilenyi, artist-in 
residence at Florida State Uni- 
versity School of Music, perform- 
ing two Beethoven concertos. The 
orchestra rendered skillful ver- 
sions of the Overture to Offen- 
bach's "Orpheus in the Under- 
world" and selections form Tsch- 
aikowsky's "The Sleeping Beau- 
ty." 

The Contemporary Dancers 
played to an enthusiastic house 
at their Christmas Dance Con- 
cert last week, which featured 
seasonal novelties and costumed 
routines to modern and tradition- 
al music. Colfax junior Bill Nolan 
headlined, under the direction of 
Dr. Colleen Nelken. 

Points for originality go to 
Davis Players, who produced and 
acted their own melodrama, "Dir- 
ty Work at the Crossroads," in 
the Student Union Ballroom Wed- 
nesday and Thursday evenings. 
Directed by Lake Charles speech 
major Nancy Martin and punctu- 
ated by group singing and other 
more vigorous forms of audience 
participation, the show drew 
large audiences both nights of 
pedformances, and promises to 
become an annual affair. 




HER CHRISTMAS GIFT was a bracelet, the symbol of the college's 
ideal of beauty. Lady of the Bracelet Marcie Fowler, a blonde, blue- 
eyed freshman from Natchitoches, is pictured after winning the cov- 
eted title from a field of twenty screened contestants in the SGA- 
sponsored contest last week. Marcie joins the Sauce staff this week in 
wishing every student and teacher the happiest of holidays. 



No Coliseum Chaos 



F reshman P rexy n n • , nl 

Resigns office; Pre-Registration Plan 
vp Takes Post | n Effect This Spring 



Freshman Class President Ma- 
con Gean submitted his resigna- 
tion from office Monday night 
at the SGA meeting Gean's writ- 
ten resignation, based on person- 
al reasons, was accepted by the 
SGA. 

Fteshmei L-Vice-preside nt^David 
Pre cjtt am^omatically became 
president to replace Gean. As 
the new class head Precht was 
authorized to appointGa^land 
Riddle, Frosh vice-presIdenC 

Riddle, who had been serving 
as a freshman associate, vied 
against Gean for the Frosh Presi- 
dency earlier this semester and 
was defeated by a three vote 
margin. 



According to a release from 
the Registrar's Office, students 
who plan to attend college here 
during the spring semester will 
have to complete a portion of 
their registration in advance. 

The release also noted that 
there will be no advising of stu- 
dents in the Coliseum as in the 
past. 

In the release, students were 
instructed to report to their ad- 
visors Wednesday, Jan. 3, the 
iffirst day 4fter the Christmas 
holidays. At that time advisers 
will have students' registration 
packets. 

After consulting with his ad- 



College To Seek 
University Title 

Kilpatrick Reveals Plans, 
Hears Student Problems 



Runoff Set Thursday 
For Mr., Miss NSC 



The Student Union was 
the scene of excitement yes- 
terday as students selected 
four of the twelve seniors 
nominated for the honor of 
Mr. and Miss NSC to battle 
for the title in the run-off 
election. 

Dennis K. Newbury and Danny 
Bob Turner, leading the field of 
six competitors, earned the right 
to vie for the Mr. NSC title in the 
runoff election tomorrow. 

Finalists for Miss NSC are 
Norma Louise "Ginger" Foshee 
and Sue Peterson. 

Competing for the Mr. NSC 
honor were nominees John R. 
Ramsey, Jr., David E. Butler, 



Turner, Newbury, Jere Daye and 
Walter Pilcher. Miss NSC con- 
testants were Shirley Kay Dickie, 
Miss Foshee, Lynda Lee Law- 
rence, Frances Toler, Annette 
Wallace and Miss Peterson. 
These twelve were originally 
nominated for the title by camp- 
us organizations and dormitory 
residents. 

It is a custom of the College to 
withold the names of the two 
winners until the annual Christ- 
mas Assembly at which Presi- 
dent Arnold Kilpatrick will con- 
fer the honors. 

This year's assembly is set for 
1 p.m., Dec. 18 in the Fine Arts 
Auditorium. 



viser, each student should work 
out his spring semester schedule 
and make a trial schedule card. 
Then, he should fill out the cards 
in his packet, with the exception 
of the front of the number three 
card . 

Upon completing the first two 
steps, the student should leave 
the completed trial schedule card 
and packet with his adviser, un- 
less the information in the packet 
is incorrect. 

If any information in the 
packet is not accurate, it should 
be noted on the pink change card. 
If there is a mistake, the student 
should take the change card and 
packet to the Registrar's office 
for correction. The next day the 
student may pick up the correct- 
ed packet and return it to his ad- 
viser. 

On January 29 or 30, the stu- 
dent should pick up his trial 
schedule card and packet at his 
adviser's office. 

During the regular registration 
period, the student should then 
take his trial schedule card and 
packet to the Coliseum at the 
time indicated in the registration 
schedule. 

Also during registration, he 
should secure his class cards, 
complete the front of the num- 
ber three card, and pay his fees. 

If the student's packet is lost 
or damaged, a fee of $2.00 will be 
charged for replacement. 

Graduate students should ob- 
tain packets from the Office of 
the Dean of Graduate Students, 
Room 105 in the Administration 
Building. 



By Diane Nickerson, Editor 

University status for North- 
western may be in the offer- 
ing in the near future, re- 
vealed President Arnold Kil- 
patrick and Dean of the Col- 
lege Charles Thomas during 
the semester's second presi- 
dential press conference with 
Current Sauce staffers last 
Tuesday. 

Area state senators and re- 
presentatives, according to 
Kilpatrick, will petition fche 
legislature during the next 
session to grant the College 
university status. 

Granting of such status, ex- 
plained the President, is based 
on graduate work and the num- 
ber of schools within a college. 
At the present, Northwestern, he 
pointed out, has a graduate en- 
rollment of 1308, while Southern 
University, which is rated next, 

Assembly Show 
Features Bands, 
Choral Reading 

The annual Christmas Assem- 
bly will be held Monday Dec. 18 
at 1 p.m., and classes will be dis- 
missed beginning Dec. 20 and 
continuing through Jan.. 2 for 
the Christmas holidays. 

Highlighting the assembly will 
be the announcement by Presi- 
dent Arnold R. Kilpatrick of the 
winners of the Mr. and Miss NSC 
contest. 

Students voted yesterday for 
six men and six women students 
for the Mr. and Miss Northwest- 
ern titles, the highest honors 
which can be given students at 
the college. 

In charge of the program for 
the assembly is J. Robert Smith, 
director of bands. 

The College's 90-peice sym- 
phonic band will present a con- 
cert of traditional Christmas 
music to students, who will be 
dismissed from classes for the 
assembly. 

Ray Schexnider of the speech 
department will present a mod- 
ern reading of "Twas the Night 
Before Christmas." 



has only 691; Northeast has 545, 
and Tech, 490. 

"If anyone deserves university 
status, we do," emphasized Kil- 
patrick. Both Northwestern and 
Northeast State College are to be 
considered by the legislature for 
recognition as universities. 
ATTENDANCE REGULATIONS 

The possibility of hiring an 
assistant attendance officer was 
discussed by Kilpatrick and 
Thomas when Sauce staff mem- 
bers registered student discon- 
tent and dissatisfaction over dif- 
ficulty of obtaining excuses for 
class absences. 

Problems, explained Sauce 
members and other students, 
have resulted recently due to stu- 
dent congestion in the attendance 
office. Also, the students pointed 
out, Mrs. Jerry Wilson, attend- 
ance officer, was often out of 
her office durmg convenient stu- 
dent hours. 

Kilpatrick explained that the 
College enrollment had increased 
this year by 22 per cent and that 
the administration had failed to 
realize that this increase might 
cause a problem in the attend- 
ance office. 

Kilpatrick and Thomas agreed 
to investigate the possibility of 
hiring an assistant attendance 
officer 

In other discussion of attend- 
ance regulations, Thomas pointed 
out that the attendance rules 
were set down by the State 
Board of Education and not by 
the College. In fact, explained 
Thomas, from 1946 to 1956 at 
Northwestern there were no at- 
tendance rules, "but parents and 
many students asked for the reg- 
ulations." 

TRAFFIC CONGESTION 

Campus traffic congestion was 
another topic of discussion dur- 
ing Tuesday's press conference. 
Kilpatrick stated that there had 
been very little overall planning 
for. a road and expansion system 
on campus previously. 

For further expansion, a net- 
work of roads, lights and side- 
walks will be necessary. This 
must be done, he explained, by 
gradual long-range planning. 
Construction of such a system, 
the President noted, costs almost 
$1 million per mile. 



Christmas Menu 

Iberville and St. Denis Cafeterias' 
December 18, 1967 
Relish Tray 

Ambrosia Salad Tossed Green Salad 

Baked Young Tom Turkey 
Cornbread Dressing 
Giblets Gravy 
Cranberry Sauce 
Baked Ham 
Pork Roast 
Spiced Peaches 
Candied Yams with Marshmellows 
Buttered English Peas 
Hot Rolls Mincemeat Pie 

Ice Cream 
Soft Drinks 
Tea, Milk 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 13, 196T 



e>3><s>«xs><s>^<exs><sxs>3><s><^^^ 



EDITORIAL 



Southwestern Editor Says 'Ban The Ban 



(Editor's Note: The following is an excerpt 
from a personal reply by Doug Manship, editor 
of the Southwestern Vermillion, to Airman 
Ray Benoit Jr., a serviceman in Viet Nam who 
wrote a letter to the editor asserting that "it 
would be wrong to allow Communist speakers 
on campus, because they might be able to con- 
vince someone that their philosophy is right, 
which would weaken our system of government 
and our freedoms." ) 

I'm afraid I must disagree with you on 
this point, for three main reasons. 

First, when something is forbidden to 
a person or a group of people, it is gen- 
erally becomes even more attractive to 
them. Consider Christianity, prohibition, 
Adam and Eve, and sex. By denying to 
a group of college students the right to 
hear a proponent of Communism, you 
run the risk of making it that much more 
attractive to them. 

Second, it is always much easier to 
find the weakness in a position when it 
is presented in the open, with a chance 
for questioning and rebuttal. A speaker 



who can hand-pick his audience and then 
take them off to a secret room for a 
couple of hours stands a much better 
chance o f converting them than he 
would in open debate. 

The third reason, however, is to me 
the most important. To deny the stu- 
dents the right to hear a Communist 
speaker appears to me to be a violation 
of two constitutional rights, the speak- 
er's right of Freedom of Speech and the 
student's right of Freedom of Assembly. 

These constitutional freedoms were 
not easily obtained, but they are easily 
lost. Once curtailed, they are more easily 
curtailed the second time, the third, and 
so on. 

It makes me sick to hear some idiot 
advocate the gassing of Jews, the hang- 
ing of "niggers" or the burning of cities. 
But that is the price you must pay for 
being free. That is the ideal for which 
you and men like you are fighting. 

— Doug Manship Jr. 



Dr. Edward Greco 



Famed Scientist 
Is Now College's 
Research Chief 



One of the nation's outstanding 
scientists, Dr. Edward Greco, has 
been appointed director of Re- 
search and Planning for the 
North Louisiana Supplementary 
Education Center here. 

According to an announcement 
by College President Arnold R. 
Kilpatrick and Natchitoches Par- 
ish School Board Superintendent 
C. C. Graham, the appointment 
became effective Nov. 1. 

For several years, Dr. Greco 
has been employed as Senior Re- 
search Associate with the United 
Gas Corporation in Shreveport. 

In 1962, he headed a team of 
scientists and engineers selected 
from industry and education for 
a reciprocal exchange visit to re- 
search institutes in Russia. 

Born in Marsala, Italy, in 1911, 
Dr. Greco came to the United 
States in 1914 and became a nat- 
uralized citizen in 1941. He grad- 
uated from Northwestern State 
College in 1934 with a BA de- 
gree in chemistry and biology. 

In 1945, he joined United Gas 
as a Research Chemist and in 
1961 was promoted to Senior Re- 
search Associate where he acted 
as Supervisor of Special projects 
and was consultant to laboratory 
•and operating departments of 
United Gas. 

Dr. Greco was named chair- 
man in 1962 of the Permanent 
Council of International Coun- 
cil on Metallic Corrosion, having 
served as organizer of the Coun- 
cil and Congress. He was recent- 
ly chosen as vice-president of the 
Honorary Council of the Fourth 
International Council on Metal- 
lic Corrosion to be held in Am- 
sterdam, Holland in 1969. 



Letter t The Editor 



Dear Editor, 

While reading a copy of Read- 
er's Digest recently I ran across 
an article showing a breakdown 
on social security taxes. Anyone 
who has ever looked at the de- 
ductions that come out of their 
paycheck might have noticed 
that an appreciable part of the 
deductions are in the form of 
social security or what is termed 
"old age benefits". 

What is social security? To me 
it's just another outrageous tax. 
Originally social security was to 
benefit those who were no long- 
er able to work because of sick- 
ness, injury, or retirement at the 
specified age. Now, however, this 
usurpatious tax is just another 
form of income for the Federal 
Government. 

In an AP wire story sometime 
last January, these statistics were 
revealed: a 21 year-old man who 
is just beginning his career has 
44 years in which he has to pay 
social security tax. When he 
reaches the age of retirement at 
65 he will have paid over $33,000. 

A person has the life expect- 
ancy of 13 years after he retires. 
During these 13 years he will re- 
ceive $19,000 in social security 
benefits. This is some $14,000 
less than he has paid in. 

This seems a little unreason- 
able to me. Sure, there are peo- 
ple who live longer and get more 
than they have paid but what a- 
bout the people who die at the 
age of 50 or so? This money, 
which has been appropriated for 
the personal benefit of the work- 
ing man is going somewhere but 
where? 

As an informed American, I 
think that we should call for an 
investigation of our social secur- 
ity laws, especially since there is 
a bill in Congress presently that 
will increase social security to 
such an extent that the ordinary 
working man will severly feel the 
blow as the governmental tax 
knife whittles away at his already 



dwindling paycheck. 
A Poor Worker 



James Field Named Psychology Club 
President; Group Adds 30 Members 



James N. Field of Natchitoches 
has been elected' president of 
the Psychology Club. Other of- 
ficers eiected were Mike Beer, 
Fitchburg, Mass., vice-president; 
Dian Kanapkey, Shreveport, sec- 
retary, and Virginia Ann Gray, 
Shreveport, treasurer. 

Dr. Donald O. Gates has been 
appointed faculty adviser of the 
club, which has 44 active mem- 
bers and approved 30 more for 
membership this week. 

Membership in the club is lim- 



ited to phychology majors and 
minors who have earned a 2.5 av- 
erage out of a possible 4.0. The 
club also offers affiliate mem- 
berships for other interested 
students who have completed 
three hours of study in 
phychology. 

The club, which has been in 
existence for two years will be 
eligible to apply for a chater 
at the end of the year to affiliate 
with Psi Chi, national honor frat- 
ernity in phychology. 



oxfcRiooe 




...THE FINE FOR JOUSTING- WITH, 
AND UNHORSING- A. CAMPUS COP IS 



Three Wrecks In One 
Night? Impossible! 



Dear Editor: 

I have just returned from a 
one-day visit in one of my favor- 
ite cities: Natchitoches, my form- 
er home while a student at NSC. 
Being a band director, this is a 
visit that I look forward to each 
year at this time of the Christ- 
mas Festival. 

It's such a magnificent thing- 
the festval- for my students to 
see. And many of them would 
probably never see it if it weren't 
for their membership in this 
band. But there is some question 
in my mind today about whether 
I can afford to continue our part- 
icipation in this wonderful cele- 
bration in future years. 

It is not my primary purpose 
in writing this letter to simply 
criticize and condemn the entire 
student body of my Alma Mater; 
rather, it is hoped that I might 
say something here that may 
help just one young adult find a 
better direction in his life. In 
dealing with my own teen-age 
students from day to day I see 
that the vast majority of these 
young people could never be fit- 
ted into the general "news-eye" 
picture of today's decadent stu- 
dent. This is simply the realiz- 
ation of the old sad-but-true ad- 
age, "the many must suffer for 
the misdeeds of the few." 

The point of this letter is my 
sick-at-heart observation of the 
young adults (college enrollees 
and others) on Saturday, Decem- 
ber 2nd, 1967. Specifically, the 
wide-open drinking going on 
right on the streets of this lovely 
old college town. Oh, I know, 
"Things have changed, Man!" 
since my wife and I left the hill 
ten years ago, but does truth, 
does right and wrong, does com- 
mon courtesy, and does the moral 
standard change!? Have you be- 
come so self-centered as to not be 
concerned for the welfare and 
well-being of those around you? 

What of your loved ones? I 
could only wonder at what ex- 
planation you would offer should 
you quite unexpectedly happen 
upon your parents carrying the 
drink that you had in your hand 
last Saturday.. . . This is a deep 
concern to me because, you see, 
I am now the father of two won- 
derful little girls, and I wonder 
what their free-time activites 
will include some twelve years 
from now. 

What's the answer? I have 
found the answer for me: "As for 
me and my house, we will serve 
the Lord! !" 
Sincerly, 
Gardner Vaughn 
BME, '59 



On an otherwise peaceful and 
quiet night, while most of the 
other residents of swinging Nat- 
chitoches had retired for the 
evening, George Gray, a sopho- 
more accounting major, managed 
to execute the remarkable feat 
recently of raising the weekend 
accident rate three times — all 
within a span of two hours! 

At approximately 11:45 p.m., 
George was patiently waiting for 
traffic to clear in the new park- 
ing lot next to Sabine Hall when 
WHAM!— the president of North- 
east State College's student body 

Chemistry Dept. 
Buys Over $6000 
Of New Equipment 

Two new pieces of equipment 
have been installed in the Col- 
lege's Department of Chemistry 
for use in research and instruc- 
tion. 

Dr. Alan Crosby, head of the 
department, said the college has 
just received a Beckman Model 
979 Atomic Absorption System 
and a Beckman Model 772 Ratio 
Fourimeter. 

Both instruments are used ex- 
tensively in the undergraduate 
instruction program and have al- 
ready been utilized for research 
by both students and faculty 
members. 

Installed at a cost of more than 
$6,000, the equipment serves as 
sensitive meascring devices. The 
atomic absorption system is used 
for teaching analytical chemistry. 

Weekly Concert 
Hour Continues 

The Concert Hour, a two-hour 
program of recorded classical 
and semi-classical music, has re- 
turned to the air for the ninth 
consecutive year. Continuing as 
commentator and host is Dr. 
Joseph B. Carlucci, head of the 
NSC Music Department. 

The program is broadcast 
over radio staition KNOC in 
Natchitoches every Sunday after- 
noon beginning at 1 p.m. and 
may be heard through the month 
of May. 

Everyone is invited to listen 
and special requests may be dir- 
ected to Dr. Carlucci by writing 
him in care of the Music Depart- 
ment or by calling 357-5816. 



plowed into the left side of his 
car. Campus Security arrived to 
investigate the accident, and with 
their usual efficiency, soon had 
George on his way again. 

Less than thirty-five minutes 
later as George was confidently 
cruising along to his dorm, sure 
that no other mishaps would be- 
fall him, from out of nowhere 
came an MG heading straight for 
his left door. 

Speedy campus security was 
once again on the scene to hand 
George his second accident re- 
port. 

A short time later, George was 
seen bravely driving along with 
his mangled left door, surround- 
ed by a police escort which had 
been recruited to see the unfor- 
tunate Mr. Gray safely out of 
town. 

Impossible as it seems, forty- 
five minutes later, as the now 
nearly petrified George maneu- 
vered his way across a brige in 
Coushatta, a car driven by an un- 
identified young Negro girl 
slammed into the right side of 
the car. 

With a stricken expression on 
his face, George scrabbled 
through the only remaining exit, 
the back right door, and accepted 
his third and final (?) accident 
report of the night. 



^^urrent S 



auce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex- 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription $3 the year payable in advance. 



Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Assoc. Editor 

Frances Toler News Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Sports Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Dianne Dickerson staff Artist 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: Mary Ann Anderson, Pat 
Wegmann, Danny Boutwell, Gail Dooley, 
Ray King. Gidget MaxweU, Jack Mont- 
gomery, Garland Riddle, Shirley Rut- 
ledge, Alton Sanders, Ed Thompson, 
Thomas Turner and Virginia Ann Wo- 
olen. 



» T^VES" ta P^ted oy the Graphic 
Alt* Division of the Industrial Educa- 
tion Department of Northwestern 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 



Did Scrooge Miss The Point? 



By Charles Skinner 

Amid figures such as the stingy 
miser Ebeneezer Scrooge, the 
horrid Grinch, who stole Christ- 
mas and mean old King Herod, 
himself, the dissenter to the mod- 
ern day observance of Christmas 
takes his place in society. 

However, one doesn't have to 
hate the whole human race to be 
fed up with the commercializa- 
tion, the alcoholization, and the 
festivalization of Christmas. Alco- 
hol, crepe payer, and second- 
hand gifts, are, at the very best, 
a poor substitute for discipleship 
and worship. No matter how 
much he loves red, blue and 
green Christmas lights, these are 
only the barest shadow of the 
real thing. The real thing is a 
face to face encounter with a 
living God . . . 

To intellectual college stu- 
dents, this may seem illogical 
and unfounded because the 
majestic figure of God has not 
yet made a speaking tour of the 
campus, moved any of the moun- 
tains in Natchitoches Parish, or 
parted the waters of Chaplain's 



Lake. 

The pivotal point of the better 
Christmas lies instead in physical 
phenomena, in the depths of 
every individual's heart, and is 
as available as fudge in Decem- 
ber. The better Christmas lies in 
a new awareness of Jesus Christ 
as friend and Savior and in a 
new awareness in one's own heart 
of peace on Earth, good will to-, 
ward men. 

The better Christmas lies in 
the giving of not only material 
gifts, but taking some time to 
show love with a friendly con- 
versation with someone you 



never cared for. It may be found 
in a new prayer that Christ, 
by entertaining prople's hearts, 
make this a better world. It may 
be found in the warmth of a 
contact with the genuine spirit of 
Christmas, Christ himself. 

As the nose of Rudolph blinks 
off into the twilight and Santa 
goes back to the North Pole for 
yet another year's convalescence, 
the true and lasting spiritual 
gifts of Christmas remain a con- 
stant reminder that Christ is 
alive all year and not merely ex. 
humed each year for one more 
festival. 



Seven Senior Home Economics Majors 
Inducted Into National Organization 



Seven College hme economics 
majors have been inititaed into 
the national and state chapters 
of the home economics associ- 
ation. 

Only home economists and 
graduating seniors in home econ- 
omics are eligible for member- 
ship in the American Home Econ- 
omics Association and the Louis- 
iana Home Economics Associ 
ation. 



Dr. Marie Dunn, head of the 
department of home economics, 
initiated the seven seniors into 
the organization this week. 

Gaining membership in the or- 
ganizations were Mrs. Judy Byles 
Many; Suzanne Chabeck, La- 
combe; Juanita Dow, West Mon- 
roe; Sherryl Short, Winnsboro, 
and Mrs. Bernice Smith, Natchi- 
toches. 



Woman Politician To 
Speak At Graduation 



Faculty 
Briefs 



Dr. W. G. Erwin, Biological 
Science Department head, serv- 
ed as consultant for a regional 
conference on Undergraduate 
Education in Biological Science 
held last Saturday at East Texas 
State University. 

He represented the Commis- 
sion on Undergraduate Education 
in the Biological Sciences, Wash- 
ington, D. C, at the request of 
Dr. Martin Schein, director. Dr. 
Erwin also recently served as 
co-chairman of the Louisiana 
Conference on Undergraduate 
Education in the Biological 
Sciences held in Baton Rouge. 
The Conference was attended by 
representatives from most of the 
state's colleges and universities. 



Four College faculty members 
attended a meeting in New 
Orleans recently of the executive 
council of the American Person- 
nel and Guidance Association. 

Representing Northwesitern 
were Dr. Jack Daniels, associate 
professor of educational guid- 
ance and psychology; Oscar Bill- 
ingsley of fne testing and coun- 
seling center; Mrs. Polly John- 
son, pilot counselor in the North- 
western Laboratory School, and 
Dr. Raymond McCoy, head of the 
department of educational psy- 
chology and guidance. 



Mrs. Mary Evelyn Parker, form- 
er commissioner of the state's 
Division of Administration, will 
be featured speaker at the col- 
lege's fall commencement exer- 
cises, according to President 
Arnold Kilpatrick. 

Two-hundred and sixty-nine 
students are candidates for de- 
grees at the commencement exer- 
cises, which will be held Jan. 25 
in Prather Coliseum at 8 p.m. 

A candidate for state treasurer 
in the Feb. 6, general election, 
Mrs. Parker was unopposed for 
the Democratic nomination in the 
Nov. 4 primary election. 

Mrs. Parker, who was appoin- 
ted commissioner of the Division 
of Administration by Gov. John 
McKeithen in 1964, resigned from 
the position to seek the treasur- 
er's post which will be left vacant 
by the retirement of A.P. Tug- 
well. 

Since 1948, Mrs. Parker has 
held two other major state posts. 



'Alliance' To Play 
At College Dance 

An all-college dance will be 
held in the Student Union Ball- 
room this Saturday from 8 to 
11:30 p.m. The dance sponsored 
by the S.U. and the SGA will fea- 
ture the Alliajnce, a psycdelic 
group, from Ruston. 

This dance will be the last all- 
college dance before the Spring 
semester. According to Bill Fow- 
ler, SGA Entertainment Com- 
mittee head, other such dances 
will be scheduled for Spring in 
a further effort by the committee 
to better serve the sudent body. 



YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE AT UNITED S STORE 




She was named director of the 
Department of Commerce and 
Industry by Gov. Earl K. Long 
in 1948 and served in that capac- 
ity until 1952. 

She served as commissioner of 
the Department of Public Wel- 
fare form 1956 until 1963, during 
the terms of Long and Gov. Jim- 
mie H. Davis. 

A native of Fullerton, Mrs. Par- 
ker received her bachelor's de- 
gree from Northwestern State 
and a degree in social welfare 
from the Louisiana State Uni- 
versity graduate school. 



Vega Selected As 
Judge At Olympic 
Meet In Mexico 

Gymnastics coach Armando Ve- 
ga has been selected to judge the 
gymnastics competition for the 
1968 Olympic games in Mexico 
City. 

Vega, in his first year here, was 
named to the post last week at 
the annual Amateur Athletic 
Union convention held in New 
Orleans. 

A thre e-time All-American 
gymnast during his college career 
at Penn State University, Vega 
was named to two U.S. Olympic 
teams and twoU.S. World Game 
teams before his retirement from 
active competition in 1964. 

Vega replaced Fred Martinez 
as coach of the National Assoc- 
iation of Intercollegiate Athletics 
and AAU national champion Dem- 
on gymnasts. 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 
Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



Grillette Jewelers 

Home of the 
Keepsake Diamond Rings 

We are now handling Fraternity, 
Sorority and Varsity DROP LETTERS 

Watchmaking & Engraving 
a Specialty 



582 Front Street 



Phone 352-3166 



Your Quality Jeweler 



This is Guillet Studio 




EVERY DAY IS SALE DAY AT UNITED! 



We wish all NSC students and faculty 
a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 

Special reduced prices for prints 

No charge for your proofs 



Page 4 



iHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 



Wresist. 



Dean Hendrick Says Thank You ROTC Commander 




W remember, 
the "Wis silent. 



(Editor's Note: Written by Dean of Women Lucile Hendrick and ad- 
dressed to all coeds and Women's residence hall house directors, 
this letter is a means of thanking all those who participated in Sun- 
day's AWS Christmas-at-Home reception. Complete details of the 
annual Christmas event can be found on Page 7.) 

December 13, 1967 
Dear Women Students of N. S. C. and 
House Directors of the Women's 
Residence Halls 

The displays at the Christmas-at-Home program, as depicted 
and portrayed by you in accordance with your assigned theme, 
were outstanding and breathtakingly lovely. 

They reflected your concentrated efforts, your enthusiasm, 
your boundless and unlimited creative talents and ingenuity, 
and your concerned interest in the "spirit of giving and shar- 
ing" at this joyous season of the year. 

May your Christmas be one of wonder and glory, as you 
recall the story of the "good tidings of great joy at the birth 
of the Christ Child in Bethlehem." 
Most sincerely, 
Mrs. Lucile M. Hendrick 
Dean of Women 



If somebody tries fo tell yai» 
that all slacks are cut like Mr. 
Wrangler, resist. Hold out for 
no-flab trimness. And don't fall 
for anything that doesn't have 
Wranglok®, the wrinklefighter 
finish. It means neatness forever, 
ironing never. These Hondo* 
slacks (the Saturday night jeans) 
of wide-wale corduroy in whiskey, 
putty and charred green $7.00. 
Oxford b.d. shirt in strong colors. 
$5.00. And everything wears bet- 
ter because there's KODEL® in if 
—a muscle blend of 50% Kodel 
polyester/50% combed cotton 



Minutes of SGA 



December S, 1967 

The SGA was honored with a delight- 
ful meal at the home of President and 
Mrs. Arnold Kilpatrick. After the meal, 
President Newbury called the meeting 
to order. Minutes were read and ap- 
proved. Roll called. Absent were B. 
Fowler, Henry Burns, Maxwell, Ferrera, 
Butler, Rispoli, Cooper, Gray, Ham- 
mond, Riddle, Sellars, and Vestal. 

President Kilpatrick gave a brief 
speech to the group on the progress 
and future planning for NSC. He an- 
swered questions and offered his help 
on any problems at any time. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

Baker recommended that the Howdy 



Days be put into effect the first week 
of the spring semester. 

Skinner reported that the SGA Doc- 
ket is completed and is available to all 
NSC students. Extra copies may be 
picked up in the SGA office. 

A discussion took place about the $1 
charge for students for admission into 
the the basketball games this year. 
President Newbury said that this prob- 
lem would be looked into for more def- 
inite Information. 

Townsend moved the meeting be ad- 
journed. Seconded by Gean. Motion car- 
ried. Meeting adjourned. 
Respectfully Submitted, 
Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 



Gibson's Discount Store 



FURNISHED APARTMENT 

(ONE ONLY) 
Available for immediate occupancy (one bedroom) 

Sibley Apartments 

700 College Avenue 
352-2443 or 352-5552 



Presents Awards 

Eight ROTC Senior cadets were 
awarded Distinguished Military 
Student Awards by Lt. Col. 
Charles Avery at a recent cere- 
mony. 

Earning the coveted badge 
were Cadet Colonel Joe Cusoma- 
no, Cadet Lt. Colonels Bob Tal- 
madge and Paul Kelly, Cadet 
Captains Paul Fritz, Carl Hedle- 
ston, Bob Koll, Gerald Krause 
and Cadet First Lieutenant David 
Lambert. 

This award is based on leader- 
ship ability, moral character and 
academic standing in Military 
Science courses as well as a stu- 
dent's major. 

Dean of Men Leonard O. Nich- 
ols, a Major in the U.S. Army 
Reserves, was also present at the 
award ceremony to present the 
ROTC Corps with the NSC School 
Spirit Trophy. This marks the 
second year that the Corps has 
won the award and placed first 
over 58 other organizations on 
campus. 



Political Science 
Seminar Thursday 
Is On South Asia 

The Political Science Society 
will present a forum on the 
"Problems of Southeast Asia" to- 
morrow in Room 321 of the Stu- 
dent Union beginning at 7:30 
p.m. 

Two student members of the 
PSS have recently returned from 
a national conference on this 
same topic, and they are going 
to lead the discussion. 

The meeting is open to the 
general public, and persons at- 
tending the session will be grant- 
ed an opportunity to pose ques- 
tions to various panel members. 



For Free Delivery To All NSC Dormitories Call 



Southern Maid Donut Shop & Grill 

352-8926 



- MENU - 

Hamburgers 35c 

Ham Sandwiches 50c 

Hot Dogs 25c 

Bar-B-Q Sandwiches _ 40c 

Shrimp Sandwiches _ 50c 

Shrimp Patty Burgers 50c 

Fish Burger 45e 

Cheeseburger _ 45c 

Bacon & Tomato 50c 

Korn Dogs 25c 

Crab Burgers 50c 

Fish Sticks box 50c 

Meat Pies 30c 



- DRINKS - 

Coke 20c & 25c 

<» r "P» 20c & 25c 

Dr. Pepper 20c & 25c 

Orange 20c & 25c 

Coffee 12c 

Milk 15c 

Hot Chocolate 15 c 



- DONUTS - 

Glaxed dox. 65e 

Chocolate Iced _ dox. 65c 

Fruit dox. 80c 

Cinnamon Rolls dox. 1.20 

DELIVERED IN 
ONE DOZEN LOTS 
ONLY 



Vi Southern Fried Chicken wff $1.00 Sauceburger 15c Hamburger Steak wff $1.15 



SPECIAL PRICES TO ALL COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 

Call 352-8926 For Prices — Orders Taken From 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

ONCE ORDER IS PLACED PLEASE DO NOT CALL ABOUT IT. IT ONLY SLOWS US DOWN. 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 5 




Spring Hill Stopped 
By Demons 102-76 



PETER GRAY, a junior guard, will see plenty of action tomorrow 
night when the Demons host Southeastern in Prather Coliseum at 
7:30 p.m. Gray was named to co-captain the team along with Doug 
Watts at the start of the season. 



Led by the accurate shooting 
of Jim Peffer, Jim Wyatt and 
Andy Marusak who tallied 17 
points apiece, the Demons cagers 
were able to overcome a first 
half defecit then fight back to 
rout Spring Hill College 102-76 
in the Coliseum Saturday night. 

Trailing by a slim 41-40 margin 
when the first half buzzer sound- 
ed, the Demons outscored Spring 
Hill 28-6 in the next eight min- 
utes of play to surge into the lead 
they held the remainder of the 
game. 

The Spring Hill encounter 
marked the third consective game 
that the Demons have surpassed 
the century scoring point. The 
non-conference win bring the 
Demons present record to 1-2. 

Big 6-6 center Wyatt once again 
proved to be top man in the re- 
bounding department for t!he 
Demons grabbing 24 stray tosses. 
Marusak was next with six, fol- 
lowed by Pete Gray and Peffer 
with five apeice. 

Mike Czerniak of Spring Hill 
was the leader in this department 
for his team pulling down 12. He 
was followed by teammates Joe 
Chodkiewicz with seven each. 

Following Peffer, Wyatt and 
Marusak in the scoring column 
was Pete Gay with 16 points. 
Next was Doug Watts with 12, 
and Johnny Janese with six. 

Wayne Lee, Odis Faust and 
Bob Willett had four points to 
round out the individual scoring. 

Terry Alarcon had 19 points 
to lead the visitors in this cate- 
gory, and was followed by Stan- 
kewicz with 13. Mike Baker, Czer- 
niak and Bob Kupper had 12, 
while Joe Grill followed with 
four. 

The Demon Cagers made 46 
of 93 field goal attempts, and 
hit 10 out of 12 free throws. 
Leading the way in the rebound 
department, the Demons grabbed 



66 stray shots to the Spring Hill's 
40. 

The Demons will take the 
court tomorrow night when they 
host GSC opponent Sutheastern 
in a 7:30 encounter. The freshmen 
wll host the Lion first year men 
at 6:00. 

Navy Grants For 
Nurses Offered 

The U. S. Navy is offering full 
tuition grants to junior and sen- 
ior nursing students currently 
enrolled in accredited nursing 
schools. 

The grant pays tuition, books 
and active duty pay of $254.10 
per month while attending 
school 

A student will be commission- 
ed an ensign and will receive 
ensign's pay of about $435 per 
month during the last six months 
of school. 

Active duty requirements for 
a junior in the program is three 
years. The senior student will 
serve two years. 

All students will be sent to 
one of the large Navy hospitals 
in the United States for their 
first active duty assignment, 
Navy officials report. 

Further informatian may be 
obtained from a U. S. Navy Re- 
cruiting Offjice. 

SPORTS SHOTS 

Someone asked Eagles' rookie 
guard Jon Brooks this past sum- 
mer what happened to the H in 
his first name. "I dropped it be- 
fore my junior year at Kent 
State," he said, "so I'd be a step 
faster." It was not a surprising 
line to hear from Brooks. 

One time in college, Brooks 
won the pregame coin toss and 
was asked his choice — to kick or 
receive. "I'll take the coin," he 
said. 




ANDY MARUSAK a freshman 
forward from Sullis Prep Va., 
will be a major factor in the 
Demons attempt to win their 
first GSC contest tomorrow night 
against Southeastern. Marusak 
has averaged 17.2 points per ball 
game thus for. 



Maggio Bros, 
wishes all NSC students 




f 

■mr£L 




Merry Christmas 



T 

it 




an 



d 



I 




Prosperous New Year 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 




USM Tops Demons 
In Home Opener 



RICHARD SALAS demonstrates the form that made him the NAIA champion on the still rings. Salas 
mil be one of the performers in the gymnastics exhibition held in the Men's Gym tonight at 7:00. Salas 
is from Elmont, L. I. New York. 



The Ladner brothers spoiled 
the Demons opening home con- 
test Thursday night in the Coli- 
seum as they accounted for 64 
points in leading the University 
of Southern Mississippi to a de- 
cisive 120-108 win. 

Wendell Lander put the ball 
through the rim enough times to 
total 38 points, and was followed 
by his brother Berlin with 26. 

Brice Thornberry was next for 
the visitors with 16, and was pur- 
sued by John Vitrano with 14. 
Next in the scoring column was 
Steve Campbell with eight, fol- 
lowed by Robert Swindle and 
Paul Dodge who scored six for 
the Southerners. 

Wendall Ladner led the South- 
erners in rebounds with 13, while 
Thornberry was next with nine. 
Berlin Ladner had five, while 
Campbell had four. 

The USM team effort showed 
the Southerners grabbing a total 
of 44 rebounds, while making 26 
of 34 shots in the free throw 
department. The field goal per- 
centage of the Southerners was 
55.8 per cent. 

Although scoring 108 points in 
the ball game, the Demon cagers 
trailed from the opening minutes 
of the contest and could never 
quite catch up. 



Demon Gymnasts Engage In Workouts 
First Meet Planned For Holidays 



By Bobby Ardoin 

Students who happen to wan- 
der into the Men's Gymnasium 
during the late afternoon hours, 
may be surprised when loud, 
clearly audible noises arise from 
an obscure corner in the ancient 
structure, and then continue on 
to affect the eardrums of all 
those present 

Approaching the origin of the 
sounds, one will notice that they 
are transmitted from the mouths 
of several thin clad young men 
engaged in various difficult and 
twisting manuvers that allow 
their bodies to appear entangled 
in weird, distorted forms. 

Unconcerned with all outside 
distractions, these ywiing indi- 
viduals complete their strenu- 
ous physical tasks with looks of 
sincere dedication, and seem to 
acknowledge satisfaction only 
when their exercises are com- 
pleted properly. 

The observer will then prob- 
ably understand that those well- 
built athletes belong to the elite 
group that comprises the nation- 
ally acclaimed Demon gymnastics 
team. 

The onlooker may then recall 
that this group below him forms 
the nucleus of one of the most 
superior gymnastics teams ever 
organized on a college campus. 
Searching back into the past, he 
may remember that the Demons 
became the first team in the 
sport's history to capture two 
major titles in the same year. 

He distinctly remembers those 
two weekend nights last spring 
when the Demon gymnasts calm- 
ly strode onto the floor of Prath- 
er Coliseum, and cast all competi- 
tin by the wayside en route to 
obtaining the coveted NAIA and 
AAU titles. 

Devoured by the Demons were 
150 of the nation's top gymnasts, 
and the majority of the country's 
most prominent schools including 
arch rival USL, and top-seeded 
Southern Illinois. 

Gazing at random through the 
huge, dirty window panes that 
are positioned just below the 
building's ceiling, he recalls 
reading somewfhere that last 
years coach Fred Martinez ac- 
cepted a representatives job with 
a gymnastics equipment com- 
pany and has been replaced by 



former Olympic performer Ar- 
mando Vega. 
Vega, now attired in the tight- 

&$>&&$><&$><$>&&&&$><^^ 

Gymnastics coach Armando 
Vega, succeeding Fred Martinez 
who resigned after three years 
as the Demons gymnastics coach, 
carries a respected list of cre- 
dentials with him, and says the 
"main aim of ,the team's fall 
practice sessions is to prepare 
for the national meets." 

A graduate of Penn State Uni- 
versity, Vega was the nation's 
leading gymnast in the late 
1950's. 

He competed in the Olympic 
Games in 1956, and in Tokyo in 
1964. Vega, 31, became the first 
American in gymnastics school 
history to defeat Russian com- 
petitors in international competi- 
tion. 

He received an award for this 
feat from the Russian Gymnas- 
tics Federation. 

Elected to the Helms Gymnas- 
tic Hall of Fame, Vega was sent 
by the State Department in 1958 
and 1961 on good will tours to 
the Middle East. 

A native of Hurley, N.M., Vega 
appeared in three straight World 
Games, including the 1958 World 
Games in Moscow. 

During his sparkling career at 
Penn State, Vega won 15 first 
place titles, in the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Championships, and 24 
first places in the NCAA and 
AAU national championships. 

After graduation from Penn 
State in 1960, Vega started the 
gymnasts program at the Univer- 
sity of New Mexico. For the past 
three years, he has coached the 
Mexican Olympic team. Mexico 
has become recognized under 
Vega as the best gymnastics 
squad in South America. 

Vega was outstanding in four 
sports — football, basketball, 
track and gymnastics — at Wood- 
row Wilson High School in Los 
Angeles before going to Penn 
State. 

He won several national champ- 
ionships in high school and was 
voted the nation's best high 
school gymnast. 

fitting gymnasts garb, converses 
with two of his charges on the 



practice floor, and can be heard 
explaining to them how to per- 
fect their manuvers, and advises 
them this must be done in order 
to gain valuable form points that 
are mandatory for gymnastics 
perfection. 

Placing both hands intently 
on the metal railing that bord- 
ers the walls of the practice 
chamber, the engrossed student 
now focuses his attentions on the 
individual performers as they go 
through their exhausting prac- 
tice routines. 

Dave Beadard's graceful move- 
ments on the matted floor seem 



air after hitting the spring-sup- 
ported canvas of the 1 trampoline. 
Wadasack, who will figure large- 
ly in Vega's plans this year, 
tumbles and flips several times 
during his aerial journey, then 
lands securely on the ground. 

Observing Wadasack's move 
mentis with keen interest are 
teammates Steve Weber, Ray 
Wills and Joe Williamson, who 
await their turn in practice. 

In the middle of the floor he 
recognizes potential Olympic 
candidates John Ellas and Rich- 
ard Loyd. Both returned from 
Chicago's all-star tournament re- 




Richard Loyd 



to come almost naturally as he 
sweeps through his exercises 
with the precision of a profes- 
sional. Bob Carerro, a short, 
well-proplortioned athlete from 
New York straddles the horizon- 
tal bars with his body, and then 
begins a winding, snake-like man- 
uver that curves his body around 
the posts and then sends him 
sailing through the air. 

Jack Crawford and Bob Her- 
mann, both competitors on the 
side horse, can be seen grasping 
the middle of the equipment 
firmly, then while holding on 
with one, attempt scissor cuts 
and other complex positions that 
garnered them recognition last 
year. 

Looking to the left, the inter- 
ested observer notices Richard 
Wadsack bouncing high into the 



cently, and were selected to com- 
pete with six other American 
gymnasts against Europfe's top 
performers in New York City 
sometime this spring. 

Ellas and Loyd are not limited 
to just one event, and are cap- 
able of performing just about 
any task that Vega may assign 
them. 

Loyd was invited to participate 
in the 1968 Olympic trials in 
Mexico City earlier this fall, but 
was unable to compete due to 
sudden illness. 

Richard Salas now leaps into 
the air, and grabbing the still 
rings with both hands, demon- 
strates that form that made him 
an NAIA all-american. 

With almost unadultered form, 
the stocky Brooklyn native keeps 
both feet pointed outward, then 
slowly brings them chest-high, 



A great surge by the Souther- 
ners offense in the fading minutes 
of the second quarter accounted 
for a 11 point halftime lead 
which the Demons could never 
overcome. 

James Wyatt led the team in 
scoring for the second game in 
a row hitting the backboards for 
26 points. Guard Jim Peffer of 
Hempfield, Pa., was next in the 
scoring column with 21, and was 
followed by Andy Marusak with 
18. 

Team co-captain Peter Gray, 
managed 11, and was followed by 
Doug Watts with 10. 

Trailing the leaders with six 
points each were Johnny Janese, 
Jerry Masters, and Odis Faust. 

Center Wyatt of Belmont grab- 
bed 18 rebounds during the game, 
while Gray was next with nine. 
Following Wyatt in the rebound 
deparment was Johnny Janese 
with six 

The team as a whole garnered 
55 stray Southerner tosses, while 
making 22 of 33 free throws. 
Peffer was the leading figure in 
this phase of the ball game hitt- 
ing on five of eight. Gray was 
next with a five for nine norm. 

In the shooting department, 
the Demons were not as accurate, 
making only 43 of 96 field goal 
attempts for a 44.7 average. 

The Demons and the Souther- 
ners will meet in a rematch later 
on this season when they play 
each other in Hattisburg, Miss., 
Jan. 27. 

Ronald Roy Wins 
Paddleball Match 
In Student Union 

Sports activity in the Intra- 
mural League last week was high- 
lighted by the annual Paddleball 
tournament held in the Student 
Union game area. 

Ronald Roy of Marksville garn- 
ered first place, and became the 
owner of the winner's trophy 
for the second year in a row. 

Finishing second in the tourn- 
ament was Danny Bob Turner of 
Shreveport. 

Capturing third place in the e- 
vent was Terry Beck of Oil City. 

Next on the agenda for the In- 
tramural League will be the pool 
tournament to be held sometime 
in the near future in the Student 
Union. 

completing a movement that 
would secure points in any nat- 
ional competition. 

Turning his thoughts to the 
coming season, our observer re- 
minds himself that he must re- 
main on campus when the D e ' 
mons host the Mid-South tourna- 
ment in February. 

Running through the schedule 
in his mind, he remembers that 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. over the 
Christmas Holidays for an exhi- 
bition that will feature the best 
teams from the North and the 
South United States. 

During the semester break, the I 
Demons will once again be °? 
the road, traveling to meet form)' 
dable Southern Illinois, l ast 
year's NCAA champion. 

Regrettably, the onlooker ad- 
mits he must abandon his P 05 '' 
ion in the gym, and return to th e 
dull, stereotyped reality of can 1 ' 
pus life. , 

Slowly walking away, he 8"" 
denly considers himself an f 
pert on the Demon's gymnasts 
future, and weighs in his m> n 
the possibility of another bann e 
year that would include the su 
cessful defense of their nation 3 
titles. .j. 

Considering all angels in ® 
mind, he finally concludes at' 



watching the afternoon's 



pra* 



tice, that the Demons possess < 
abundance of superior gyrflna"^ 
talent, and that forecasting 
gloomy outlook for coach V e ° r i 
initial year would be an abs' 
gesture indeed. 



1 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



bis 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 




'OKEY CKESWEU-.lTHINK WE'LL START YOU OUT ON ref-ENSE." 



Christmas Display 
Fashioned By AWS 
Exhibited Sunday 

The "Sounds of Christmas" 
were reflected through imagi- 
native holiday displays Sunday 
as the college's Associated Wo- 
men Students presented their an- 
nual Christmas-at-Home Recep- 
tion in Varnado's Drawing Room. 

Fifteen display booths had 
been prepared by the 12 wo- 
men's dormitories, the Shreveport 
and Baton Rouge Campuses of 
Nursing School and the off-cam- 
pus AWS. Each display depicted 
a Christmas hymn, carol or other 
sounds of Christmas. 

More than 50 dolls, dressed in 
costumes centered around the 
theme were used in the displays. 
The clothing worn by each doll 
was designed and made by wo- 
men students. 

Hundreds of townspeople and 
College students attended Sun- 
day's reception to view the dis- 
plays and Students from city and 
parish schools visited the dis- 
plays Monday and yesterday. 



One Carat Diamond Ring 




to be given away at 

Sandefur Jewelers 

December 23, 1967 

All NSC students are invited to register. 
No obligations and you do not have to be 
present to win. 

Also available as a CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 
are our NSC charms at V2 price. 



117 St. Denis 



Phone 352-6390 







- 



It's What's Happening 



Wednesday, December 13 

SLTA Meeting, SU 320, 6:30 p.m. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Reception, 
SU 269-270, 6:30-9 p.m. 

Movie, "Guns of Navarone", SU Ball- 
room, 7 p.m. 

Psi-Si Frolies, Little Theatre, 8 p.m. 
Thursday, December 14 

Psychology Club Meeting, WE 309, 
6:30 p.m. 

Euthenics Club Meeting, Home Eco- 
nomics Living Room, 6:30 p.m. 

SLTA Meeting, Warren Easton Aud., 
6:45 p.m. 

Political Science Meeting, SU 321, 
7-8:30 p.m. 

Philosophy Club Meeting, SU 316, 
7-9:30 p.m^ 



Basketball Game — NSC vs Southeast- 
ern, Coliseum, 7:30 p.m. 

Friday, December 15 

All College Assembly, FA Audi- 
torium, 10 a.m. 
Saturday, December 16 

All-College Dance, Prather Coliseum, 
8-12 p.m. 
Monday, December 18 

SGA Meeting, SGA Room, SU, 6 p.m. 

Demeter Fraternity and Rodeo Club 
Meeting, SU Room 21, 6:30 p.m. 

Alli-College Assembly, FA Audi- 
torium, 1 p.m. 
Wednesday, December 20 

All classes dismissed for Christmas 
Holidays, 8 a.m. 



Debaters To Compete Against 
130 Teams at Millsaps Tourney 

Twelve members of the Debate the library has been an inval- especially grateful to Leola Loft- 
Squad, under the direction of uable aid to the debate students in, librarian in charge of govern- 
Ray A. Schexnider, will travel in preparing their cases. He is ment documents. 

to Jackson, Miss., Jan. 5 and 6 , . . — — 

for the 28th Annual Millsaps 
Collee debate tournament. 



Chicago Public Schools 

will have a representative 
on campus 
December 15, 1967 

For information about certification, 
procedures and teaching opportuni- 
ties, arrange for appointment at: 

College Teacher Placement Office 



One hundredt-thirty debate 
teams, representing 50 colleges 
and universities Ui the South, 
will participate. The topic for the 
debate is "Resolved, that the Fed- 
eral Goverment should guaran- 
tee an annual minimun cash in- 
come to all citizens." 

Hhe debaters will be organ- 
ized into three categories Men, 
women and Junior Division. 
Northwestern is entering the 
maximum of two teams in each 
category. First and second place 
trophies will be awarded in each 
category. 

Two other divisions of com- 
petition at the tournament will 
be oratory and extemporaneous 
speaking. Northwestern will en- 
ter two students in each of these 
events. First, second and third 
place winners will be chosen.. 

Schexnider is selecting the 12 
participants on the basis of their 
preoaration. Schexnider said that 




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IF YOU'RE REALLY TIRED NOTHING REPLACES SLEEP 
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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Wednesday, December 13, 1967 



Formals, Caroling 



Greek Parties Usher 
In Christmas Season 



Nancy Cole Selected Sweetheart for 
Blue Key; Organization Lists Plans 



Sorority and fraternity mem- 
bers are getting into the Christ- 
mas swing of things with a series 
of activities ranging from formal 
dances to caroling parties. On 
Saturday, Kappa Sigma presented 
its new officers and the Dream 
Court at its formal, Kappa Alpha 
had its semi-formal at the Natch- 
itoches Country Club, and soror- 
ities will be giving their annual 
parties this weekend. 

KAPPA SIGMA 

Doris Eaton was named 
Dream Girl of Kappa Sigma at 
its annual Christmas Formal Sat- 
urday night in the Student Un- 
ion. Others named to the Dream 
Court were Dianne Gilbert, Mitzi 
Brown, Sharon Wilson, and 
Royce Ann Simmons. 

Also recognized were the frat 
ernity's new officers. They in 
elude Lester Dalme, grand mast 
er; Jimmy Coco, grand scribe 
Gary Roshto, grand treasurer 
Ben Cooper, grand procurator; 
Larry Harrington, grand master 
of ceremonies; Bill Nolan and 
Dewayne Wicks, guards; Will 
Marston, pledge master; and 
Meyer Irby, assistant pledge- 
master. 

The formal preceded the an- 
nual Founder's Day Banquet Sun- 
day which commemorated the 
98th anniversary of the Fraterni- 
ty. Guest speaker for the event 
was J. Robert Mahoney, national 
secretary. 

Following the banquet, two 
men were initiated into brother- 
hood of Kappa Sigma. New initi- 
ates include Kenney Baker, grad- 
uate student in Student Person- 
nel Services from Gueydan; and 
Dr. Virgil Howe, professor of 
biolegy and the fraternity's 
sponsor. 

KAPPA ALPHA 

The Natchitoches Country Club 
formed the setting for Kappa 
Alpha's Christmas semi-formal. 
Highlighting the evening was the 
presentation of gifts to Mrs. J. 
T Lewis, wife of the chapter's 
alumnus advisor, and Patsy Lee, 
the KA rose. 



Another Christmas activity 
planned by the fraternity is a 
party tomorrow for the class of 
retarded children at George 
Parks Elementary School. "Santa 
Claus" will be portrayed by Don 
Welsh. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

Three men were initiated into 
Tau Kappa Epsilon recently at 
the Trinity Episcopal Churcn. 
They are Rick Jaggers, Charles 
Bowlero and Ronald Mayfield 

The fraternity has also added 
Terry Beriault to its pledge mem- 
bership. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

BiH Schwartz has been elected 
to the presidency of Sigma Tau 
Gamma for the coming year. 
Serving with Schwartz will be 
Russ Gielow, vice president; Bob 
Nida, secretary; Cecil Campbell, 
treasurer; Mike Wajler, pledge 
trainer; Dave Williams, sergeant- 
at-arms; George Gray, parliamen- 
tarium; Stan Parham, chaplain; 
Bob Cyphert; Jim Knapp, rush 
chairman; Mike Hiebel, intramur- 
al director; Paul Piatt, corres- 
ponding secretary; and Bob 
Murphy, Jr. IFC representative. 

SIGMA KAPPA 

A caroling party and barbecue 
supper is being planned for Sun- 
day night by Sigma Kappa. The 
event will be preceded by a par- 
ty given tonight by the pledges 
for the actives. 

TRI SIGMA 

Pledges and actives of Tri Sig- 
ma sorority will begin their 
Christmas festivities with a party 
at the Woufee tomorrow night. 
Friday night members attend 
their formal at Joe's Coffee Pot. 

DELTA ZETA 

Deta Zeta's Christmas activit- 
ies include a food drive for needy 
families, formal dance Saturday 
nifeht, and! a caroling perty 
Sunday night. 

Theme for the formal, which 
will be held in the Student Un- 
ion, will be "Bells of Qhrist- 
mas." 



Stepped-up activities along with 
the election of Blue Key Darling, 
Nancy Cole, exemplify the already 
active program of the Blue Key 
National Honor Fraternity. 

Nancy, a senior Social Studies 
major from Oberlin, is a member 




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Nancy Cole 

of the Purple Jackets as well as 
the scholastic honor fraternity, 
Phi Kappa Phi. She is also a mem- 
ber of the executive council of the 
Baptist Student Union. 

Members of the Blue Key Or- 
ganization are chosen on the basis 
of leadership in both extracurricu- 



lar and scholastic endeavers. Mem- 
bership is one of the highest 
honors that can be conferred upon 
a male student on this campus. 

Among the service projects that 
have taken place during the year 
have been responsibility for the 
cheerleader training camp during 
summer school, assistance at 
registration each semester, and as- 
sistance in numberless other 
areas in which the need has 
arisen. 

The members of this fraternity 
may be distinguished readily by 
their black blazers bearing a 
pocket crest of a golden eagle 
upon a blue background. These 
blazers have been furnished by 
the Student Government Associa- 
tion. 

President of the organization 
is Robert Mock who is responsi- 
ble for the coordination of the 
activities of the group. The facul- 
ty advisor is Dean Leonard O. 
Nichols who funishes the needed 
leadership. 

The calling out and initiation 
of new members will occur this 
spring. New members are taken 
from both the faculty and the 
students. 

FROLICS CANCELLED 

The Psi-Si Frolics scheduled 
for tonight at 8 o'clock have been 
cancelled according to the presi- 
dents of the two sponsoring or- 
ganizations, Susan Michael, Sig- 
ma Alpha Iota, and Bobby Kerr, 
Phi Mu Alpha. Both groups are 
honorary music fraternities. 



LUCK 
CONSTABLE JOHN 



Terry 



Cane Theatre 



710 Second St. 
Natchitoches, La. 
Phone 352-2922 



FRIDAY — SATURDAY 



SEE 

TARZAN 

CHALLENGE 
THE WORLD'S 
MOST Nt 
MODERN 
WEAPONS! 




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Alan Ladd — Jean Arthur 
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SHANE 



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SUNDAY - MONDAY - TUESDAY 




From the adventure continent 
one of its most exciting tales! 



PARAMOUNT 
PICTURES 

presents 



The 



Last Safari 



WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY 

"THE TEXAN" 

Starring 

Audie Murphy — Broderick Crawford 
PROJECTIONIST NEEDED 



—NOTICE— 

The Don and Chief Drive- 
in Theatres will be closed 
Tuesday Night, December 
19, Only. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
| Sat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 

[|] Tonight through 
Saturday 



Here is the shock- 
ing story of how 
and why each year 
thousands of young 
| girls disappear . . . 
Maybe in the 

"HOUSE OF 
100 DOLLS" 

Vincent Price 

In Color 

Starts Sunday 

Peter Fonda 
Susan Strasberg 
Dennis Hooper 

In 

"THE TRIP" 
Color 

Closed Tuesday 



CHI EF 



DRIVE-IN 





Tonight Bucknite 

Paul Newman 
Is 

"HARPER" 
— Co-Feature — 
Frank Sinatra 
"MARRIAGE ON 
THE ROCKS" 
Both In Color 

Thursday-Friday 

Audrey Hepburn 
"TWO FOR 
THE ROAD" 
In Color 

Saturday Only 

Don Knotts 
"THE GHOST AND| 
MR. CHICKEN' 
— Co-Feature — 
William Holden 
Richard Widmark 
"ALVAREZ 

KELLY" 
Both In Color 

Sunday-Monday 

Dean Martin In 
'MURDER'S ROW' | 

and . 

'THE SILENCERS"! 
Both In Color 

Closed Tuesday 



KARATE 
FOR BEGINNERS 

See Page 7 




urrent 



DARK 
AT THE TOP 

See Page 8 



Vol. LVI— No. 16 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 




The Mitchell Trio 
Leads Off Series 

Christy Minstrels Follow 
In SGA Big-Name Lineup 



JOHN, JOE, AND MIKE — Outspoken is a word often applied to the three young men who make up the 
Mitchell Trio. Sauce artist Diane Dickerson has captured the restless mood of social protest and the 
creative strength of conviction which lies behind two delightful performances that have made the group 
a prime choice for college concerts across the United States. 



The outspoken members 
of the Chad Mitchell Trio 
will initiate the Student 
Government Association's 
Spring entertainment sched- 
ule at 8 p.m. Thursday in 
Prather Coliseum. 

Merging concepts of entertain- 
ment and dissent, the lively 
threesome presents a running 
and unabashed commentary on 
contemporary life. The success 
of the trio is attributed to the 
fact that they utilize folk and 
pop-style music to speak their 
minds in an original manner. 

The group, comprised of Mike 
Kobulk, John Denver and Joe 
Frazier, have recorded ten al- 
bums and appeared on the To- 
night Show, Ed Sullivan Show, 
Steve Allen Show, Mike Douglas 
Show, and That Was the Week 
That Was. 

CHRISTY MINSTRELS 

The second nationally-known 
group to appear on campus this 
spring hardly needs to be intro- 
duced at all. The New Christy 
Minstrels have enthralled audien- 
ces all over the world since their 
formation in 1961. 

Six of the albums cut by the 



Newbury Must Choose 

SGA Council Refuses Approval Of Jamie Fair 
To VP Position, Calls For New Appointment 



By The Sauce 
Editorial Staff 

Student Government As- 
sociation President Dennis 
Newbury Monday night asked 
the SGA council for approval 
of his appointment of senior 
agri-business major Jamie 
Fair to the office of Student 
Body Vice President, but the 
council rejected the appoint- 
ment by a vote of 11-8. 

Citing Fair's lack of office- 
holding experience, the dissen- 
ters advised a more thorough 




suggested that senior govern- 
ment major David Faraldo, hold- 
er of the vice presidency in 1966- 
67, was "rumored" to be both 
available and qualified for the 
position. Faraldjo was defeated 
by Newbury in a heated race for 
the student body presidency last 
spring. 

Newbury held that his appoint- 
ment of Fair had been made 
after study and consultation with 
SGA adviser Dean Dudley Fulton, 
and that Fair was qualified be- 
cause 1 of his close association 
with Fowler and his membership 
on Fowler's Entertainment Com- 
mittee. SGA Parliamentarian and 
Entertainment Committee mem- 
ber Larry McCollum verified 
Fair's "hard work" and enthus- 
iasm in his position under Fowl- 
er. 

Other SGA members countered 



with the argument that spring 
bookings for entertainment had 
been completed, and now the 
school "needs a vice president, 
not a committee head." 

The voting, at Maxwell's re- 
quest, was done by secret ballot. 

Without council confirmation 
of his appointment, the initiative 
still lies with Newbury to name 
another replacement or repeat 
his request for Fair's approval. 
The announcement is expected 
at Monday's regular session at 
6 p.m. in the Student Union. 

In other action, the council 
heard reports and plans for 
spring semester activities rang- 
ing from "Choice '68" student 
surveys to constitutional elec- 
tions. 

"Choice '68" is a gropram by 
which students can register their 
preference in the national presi- 
dential race. On the campus level, 



students will be polled for their 
opinion on several constitutional 
amendments, including issues 
such as cheerleader election, 
mandatory student insurance, and 
student government scholarship 
funds. 

The constitutional amendments, 
which must be presented in a 
general election for official rati- 
fication, are being prepared by 
the Elections Board under the 
supervision of Chairman Henry 
Burns. 

Newbury announced plans for 
a "General Session" of the stu- 
dent body in the spring, a device 
he called a "kind of town meet- 
ing." A forum or symposium is in 
planning stages as a future tool 
for student involvment. 



New Ohristys have sold over 
five million copies. 

The group has taken other 
honors, being the first folk sing- 
ing group to have its own net- 
work television show. They then 
proceeded to set another prece- 
dent in being the first folk group 
to perform the soundtrack for 
a movie. This was the comic take- 
off on the Civil War, Advance 
To the Rear. 

Audience appeal for the New 
Christy Minstrels is to be found 
in the group's youthful lively 
spirit. Traditional folk ballads 
find expression in a background 
of guitars, banjos and a bass. 

Their "hits" include "Green 
Green", "Saturday Night", and 
"This Land Is Your Land". 

SOUL MUSIC GENIUS 

Also on the entertainment 
agenda is an April 2 concert by 
soul music genius Ray Charles. 

Driving to the heights of 
national prominence from the 
dual handicaps of blindness and 
poverty, Ray Charles has made 
hard work and dedication pay off. 
Charles has said repeatedly that 
he likes to give the audience a 
part of himself — he wants the 
people to "feel his soul." 

Nevertheless, Ray Charles is 
not the kind of entertainer who 
confronts audiences with slap- 
ped-together, hastily improvised 
numbers. On the contrary, he 
spends as much as seven sleep- 
less nights in a row in order to 
perfect a new number. Ray 
Charles is a perfectionist. 

In the Ray Charles Show, audi- 
ences will profit from that inimi- 
table touch of originality. Ray 
is the beginning of soul music. 

QUARTET HARMONY 

The sparkling performance of 
Anthony and the Imperials will 
culminate the Spring's big-name 
entertainment on May 24. 
Anthony and the Imperials have 
been a hit at colleges and uni- 
versities all over the nation and 
have solidly established them- 
selves as one of the leading cafe 
groups in the nation. 

Audiences can expect to see 
quartet harmony blended with 
frenetic dancing in an interest- 
ing combination. 

Booklets for all of the Spring 
entertainment are on sale at the 
information booth of the Student 
Union for $3.50. 



Ballet Concert Is 
Scheduled Tonight 



Dennis Newbury 
examination of qualified candi- 
dates to fill the office unexpec- 
tedly vacated last semester when 
=^A executive Bill Fowler trans- 
ferred to Loyola University Sem- 
inary. 

Leading the opposition in a 
rambhng, repetitive debate was 
wk Tr *« sor «r Scotty Maxwell, 
' qu««tioned the advisability 
Newbury's appointment, then 



The National Ballet will make 
its second appearance in Natchi- 
toches tonight on the stage of 
NSC Fine Arts Auditorium at 
8 p.m. 

Founded six years ago in Wash- 
ington, D C, the organization 
has expanded its traveling com- 
pany to 70 elements, including 
a symphony orchestra, soloists, 
and supporting troupe. 

"Serenade," with music by 
Tchaikowsky and choreography 
by Balanchine, will open the 
program. "Idylle," a Harold "pas 
de deux" choreographed by Jean- 
Paul Comelin, a member of the 
company, will follow. 



Balanchines' "Four Tempere- 
ments" is the third item on the 
program and will be followed by 
the concluding performance, 
"Con Amore," with music by 
Rossini and design by Law 
Christensen. 

Frederic Franklin, veteran of 
the Ballest Russe de Monte Carlo 
and the Slavenska Franklin Bal- 
let, is the Artistic Director of 
the company. 

Former Conductor for the San 
Francisco Ballet Company and 
the New York City Ballet, Ot- 
tavio de Rossa, will be Holder 
of the Baton. 




LEAPS — Members of the National Ballet are pictured here in one of 
their numbers, "Serenade," which will be presented tonight in the 
Fine Arts Auditorium at 8 p.m. This marks the National Ballet's 
second appearance at the college, the first being in 1966. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 



Politics and Academics 

Letters To The 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 

~3H 




''W&'RE LUCKY TO HAVEArtSUeS MOTHER 
WHO MPeZ6TAHPS> COLL£C£ 0ore.'' 



Diplomas Given 244 
At Fall Graduation 



A milestone in Northwestern's 
continuing progress was reached 
during fall commencement exer- 
cises January 25 when the Col- 
lege's first doctoral degree was 
conferred. 

State Superintendent of Edu- 
cation William J. Dodd was pre- 
sented an honorary doctor's de- 
gree in education by College 
President Arnold R. Kilpatrick. 
The doctorate was the first ever 
awarded by the College which 
received permission from the 
State Board of Education last 
month to begin offering doctoral 
degree programs in education 
next fall. 

Superintendent Dodd joined 
244 graduates in receiving de- 
grees during the fall graduation 
ceremonies. President Kilpatrick 
conferred bachelor's degrees on 
196 graduates and master's on 48. 

Topping the honor roll list of 
34 graduates was Mrs. Sue Gar- 
many DeFee of Logansport who 
graduated with a 3.88 average of 

Drug Addiction 
To Be Seminar 
Subject Monday 

Narcotics and drug addiction 
will be topics for a seminar on 
campus Monday sponsored by 
law enforcement agencies of Nat- 
chitoches Parish. 

Two sessions will be held in 
the Fine Arts Auditorium. The 
first at 1 p.m. will be attended by 
students and teachers in junior 
high and high schools, and the 
second at 7:30 p.m. is designed 
for college students and all inter- 
ested citizens. 



a possible 4.0. 

Eleven ROTC commissions were 
also awarded during the ceremo- 
nies by Lt. Col. Charles Avery of 
the College Reserve Officers 
Training Corps. 

Ted Fowler and Carol Hedleston 
were recognized as Distinguish- 
ed Military Graduates. Others 
receiving commissions were 
Charles Cash, Michael Sabino, 
William Ambler, Carey Blanchard, 
David Durr, John Sills, John 
Dousay, Michael Pearce and 
Alton Sanders. 

Named to the honor roll and 
to membership in Phi Kappa Phi, 
national honorary scholastic fra- 
ternity, were Neal Prather, Mary 
Kelly, Robin Butler, Catherine 
Wall, Linda Robicheaux, and 
Linda Sue Willis. 

Others graduating with honors 
were: Sue Garmany, Mary Stiles, 
Elease Williams, Judy Moncrief, 
Donald Turnbow, Patricia Ram- 
sey, Cheryl Moreland, Donald Cal- 
vert, Dunah Pevy, Edward Do- 
mangu, Helen McLain, Connie 
Grimball. 

Bernice Smith, Melva Hataway, 
Sandra Bryan, Judith Wallis, 
Joseph Simmons, Douglas Char- 
rier, Martha Grigg, Richard 
Smith, Jade Smith, Robert Mock, 
Suzanne Sanchez, Tommy 
Champlin, Lottie Hennigan 
Charley Mobley, Fay Ruth Tubb, 
and Jeannette Stephens. 



4*@urrent S 



auce 



ESTABLISHED 1914 



Entered as second class matter at the 
Natchitoches Post Office under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Published weekly, ex 
cept during holidays and test weeks, in 
the fall and spring, and bi-weekly in the 
summer by the Student Body of North- 
western State College of Louisiana. Sub- 
cription S3 the year payable in advance. 



To The Editor: 

Northwestern's fall commence- 
ment exercises ... or should I 
say, political rally . . . was well 
attended by hundreds from 
throughout the state. 

This was the golden oppor- 
tunity for many to see the top 
figures in the Louisiana State 
Government. Here on the NSC 
stage were none other than Bill 
Dodd and Mary Evelyn Parker. 

Mrs. Parker's campaign speech, 
lightly disguised as a commence- 
ment address, not only challeng- 
ed each graduate to be good 
citizens and strive for success, 
but also made it evident that to 
really do so, one must vote for 
Mary Evelyn Parker as State 
Treasurer. Other notables (like 
the couple who drove Mrs. Park- 
er to NSC) were also introduced 
and recognized. 

After a while, many in the 
audience forgot that this was a 
commencement exercise. But, 
finally, the diplomas were issued 
to the 244 bored graduates. 

Perhaps the spring graduation, 
which will not fall before any 
state election, will be free of 
party politics and campaigning 
and will bring more emphasis 
to the graduates in one of the 
most important ceremonies of 
their lives. 

Wayne Branton 
(Editor's note: It should be point- 
ed out that, following his policy 
of scheduling outstanding North- 
western graduates to speak at 
commencement exercises, Presi- 
dent Kilpatrick contacted Mrs. 
Parker more than a year ago, 
before she was a candidate for 
office, with his request that she 
appear at the Fall '67 gradua- 
tion.) 



To The Editor: 

I am aware that requests made 
for production of the Broadway 
musical comedy ONCE UPON A 
MATTRESS were turned down by 
those in positions of authority 
because of the suggestive use 
of the word "mattress". The play 
is based upon a children's fairy- 
tale about the princess and the 
ipea. The sjpeech department's 
desire for the play's production 
was stiffled and an alternate 
production was approved. THE 
SOUND OF MUSIC, the story of 
a nun apprentice living with an 
unmarried man with children, 
is now set for production. 

An administration - sponsored 
narcotics lecture is planned for 
the near future. 

Basketball players appear pub- 
licly with exposed armpits and 
thighs. 

Bra commercials appear night- 
ly on dormitory-housed televis- 
ions. 

Bless our administration for 
their moral actions in well-con- 
sidered censorship of the lust- 
ful and fleshy ONCE UPON A 
MATTRESS. 

Concernedly, 

E. L. Kittrell 



(Editor's Note: This letter re- 
ceived by the Sauce almost two 
months ago was not printed upon 
its receipt due to technical prob- 
lems beyond our control. Since 
it concerns objection to an article 
which appeared in the Sauce and 
was widely discussed, we pre- 
sent the letter now with apolo- 
gies for the delay.) 
Dear Editor: 

As students of Northwestern 
State College School of Nursing, 
Pineville Campus, we object to 



Editor 

the elementary impressions and 
ideas presented by Frances Toler 
in the article "Reflections on a 
Visit to a Madhouse" in the Cur- 
rent Sauce issue December 6, 
1967. 

As students in psychiatric nurs- 
ing, we realize that mental ill- 
ness is not a problem to be 
either glazed over with sugary 
words or dealt with sarcastically. 
We feel that it is rather ironic 
that Miss Toler, a psychology 
student, appears to view the 
problem of mental illness with 
such a shallow attitude. 

The title itself is highly ob- 
jectionable as it represents the 
asinine and archaic misconcep- 
tions of the general public rather 
than a college senior. Her unfor- 
tunate phrasology leaves the 
reader with the impression of a 
mental hospital as a "madhouse". 

We stand in support of the 
highly qualified staff and ad- 
ministrators of Central Louisi- 
ana State Hospital. Miss Toler 
seemed to ignore their obvious 
capabilities by her superficial 
and re redundant descriptions. 

We sincerely hope that the 
readers of "Reflections on a Visit 
to a Madhouse" do not share 
the author's apparent melodra- 
matic opinions of mental hospi- 
tals. 

NSC Nursing Students, 
Pineville Campus 

Gifford-Hill Forum 
To Be Held Here By 

School of Business 

Seven Louisiana and Texas 
businessmen will be guest speak- 
ers here Feb. 26 for the second 
annual Walter Porter Business 
Forum. 

Sponsored by the College's 
School of Business and the Gif- 
ford-Hill Companies of Dallas, 
the forum is named in memory 
of the co-founder and former 
president of Gifford-Hill. 

Opening at 9 a.m., the forum 
will be highlighted by a luncheon 
at 11:45 in the Student Union. 
President Arnold Kilpatrick will 
welcome guests, and the luncheon 
speaker will be Sam Wyly, pres- 
ident of University Computing 
in Dallas. 

Other guest speakers at the 
seminar will be James A. Whelan, 
Bill Lowery, T. O. Perry, Howard 
Jensen, Sebron Sneed, and Doug- 
las Maclay. 

Dear Administration: 

Is the unbelievable rumor true 
that classes will be held again 
this year on Mardis Gras Day, 
February 27, ? ? ? 



Discussing the problem of drug 
addiction will be Col. Wingate 
White, warden at the Louisiana 
State Penitentiary at Angola. 

Accompanying White will be 
three Angola inmates who have 
been cured of drug addiction and 
are presently working in th(e 
Narcotics Anonymous organiza- 
tion at the penitentiary. 

The meeting will be opened for 
questions following an address 
by White and comments by the 
three inmates. 

Cooperating in the organization 
and planning of the meeting are 
Natchitoches Parish Sheriff Sam 
James; Natchitoches Police Chief 
Boyd Durr; Lt. Gerald Jeansonne 
of the Louisiana State Police; 
and James Lee, chief of North- 
western Campus Security. 



Member of the Associated Collegiate 
Press 



Editorials reflect only the opinions of 
members of the staff. They do not re- 
flect the opinions of the student body 
or the administration and faculty of the 
college. 



Diane Nickerson Editor 

Jim O'Quinn Managing Editor 

Wayne Branton Business Manager 

Al Savoie Assoc. Business Manager 

Charles Skinner Campus Editor 

Vicki Weible News Editor 

Susie Chancey Profreader 

Jay Keppel Co-Sports Editor 

Bobby Ardoin Co-Sports Editor 

Jerry Pierce Faculty Advisor 

Reporters: James Cousins, James Davis. 
Pam Marcantel. James Walker Edward 
Thompson, Patsy Arnold, Linda Towry. 
Sid Turner, Gidget Maxwelll, Ja<* 
Montgomery, Steve Gunn, Tom Hardin. 
Ann Wooten, and Garland Kiddle. 



Tbi» paper is printed oy tha Graphic 
Aita Division of the Industrial Educa- 
tion Department of Northwestern. 



Editorial Policy 



Editorials aren't the most widely read features of a stu 
dent paper, but they do play a vital part in informing the 
student body as well as shedding light on certain college pro- 
blems. 

This year as in past years, the Editorial will be based on 
facts and will be the opinions of either the editor or her staff 
members. They might not correspond to those ideas held by 
some students, but those wishing to disagree are WELCOME 
tc express themsleves in letters to the Editor. 

This newspaper's primary purpose is to serve the student 
body and to provide a comprehensive report of student and 
faculty activities as well as adequate coverage of campus 
news. The Sauce is strictly a NEWSpaper for the students of 
Northwestern State College and shall remain as such through- 
out the school year. 

We are always open to constructive criticism and sug- 
gestion for the betterment of the Current Sauce. 

Letters to the Editor will be printed if signed by the 
author. However, if the writer so desires, his name may be 
deleted, but the deletion will depend on content and will not 
be granted automatically. 

The Current Sauce reserves the right to reject any letter 
because of content or character. 



It's What's Happening 



Thursday, February 8 

National Ballet, FA Auditorium, 8 p.m. 

Basketball Game, NSC vs. Tech, Col, 
7:30 p.m. 

Euthenics Club Meeting, Home Eco- 
nomics Living Room, 6:30 p.m. 

Friday, February 9 

Chamber of Commerce Banquet, 
Student Union Ballroom, 7 p.m. 

Saturday, February 10 

Intercollegiate Band Concert, FA Audi- 
torium, 7:30 p.m. 

FBLA District Meeting, SU Ballroom, 
9 a.m. -5 p.m. 



All College Formal, SU Ballroom, 
8 p.m. 

Monday, February 12 

Basketball Game, NSC vs. South- 
western, There 

Narcotics Seminar, FA Auditorium, 
1-7:30 p.m. 

Tuesday, February 13 

Superintendents Meeting, SU Ball- 
room, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 

SLTA Meeting, SU Rm. 320, 6:45 p.m. 

Mitchell Trio, Col. 8 p.m. 

Art Show, SU 2nd Floor Lobby, 
All day. 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 



SGA Additions 




New Frosh Execs 







WITH THE RESIGNATION last semester of Freshmen class president 
Macon Gean, the frosh vice-president, David Precht, (left) was auto- 
matically chosen by the Student Government Association to head the 
class. Upon assuming the presidency, Precht appointed Garland Rid- 
dle, unsuccessful candidate last fall for the freshman presidency, as 
vice-president of the class. 

Riddle, previously a freshman associate member of the SGA, will 
now join Precht and other freshmen officers as a voting Student 
Government member. 



Nine From NSC 

LSU Symposium 
To Honor State 
Student Leaders 

When Louisiana's first Col- 
lege-Business Symposium con- 
venes at LSU in Baton Rouge 
next Thursday, nine Northwest- 
ern student leaders will be among 
the 200 students attending the 
meeting. 

Student leaders from North- 
western and the state's seventeen 
other state colleges will be hon- 
ored by state businessmen at the 
symposium. 

The symposium affords junior 
and senior student leaders an 
opportunity to discuss in a "face- 
to-face" manner with outstanding 
businessmen pressing problems 
of interest and concern. Selected 
topics of general interest will be 
discussed in detail during the 
day-long program in the LSU 
Student Union. 

Representing the College at 
next week's meeting will be Loyd 
Sledge, Charles Skinner, Wayne 
Horn, Dennis Newbury, Bill 
Fowler, Richard Averitt, Joe L. 
Germany, Henry L. Burns.Charles 
Cherrier and John Ramsey, Jr. 




A MEMORIAL FUND in memory of Robert Wilson of Shreveport has 
been established by his wife. Receiving the bequest on behalf of the 
College is Ralph Butler, Alumni president, C. O. Holland, President 
Arnold Kilpatrick and E. H. Gilson. 

Future Business Leaders of America 
To Sponsor State Convention at NSC 



More than 500 students from 
12 parishes will participate in the 
annual Central District Future 
Business Leaders of America 
convention here Saturday. 

Some 50 high schools will be 
represented at the meeting with 
Natchitoches High School serv- 
ing as the host chapter. 

FLBA members will compete 
in six contests, including the Mr. 
and Miss FLBA election. Other 



competition will be in spelling, 
current events, parliamentary 
procedure and public speaking. 

Assisting in the annual meet- 
ing program will be Richard D. 
Clanton, director of business and 
office education for the State 
Department of Education, and 
Dr. Ralph White, head of the 
College's Department of busin- 
ess education and office admin- 
istration. 



'Prof of Year' 
Hears of Title 
On Radio Show 

by Alton Sanders 

Joseph W. Johnson, assistant 
professor of business education 
and office administration, was 
selected as "professor of the 
year" in a general election held 
last semester. 

Johnso;n, the medium-built, 
stern-faced professor who enjoys 
joking with his students while 
he instructs them, did not even 
know about the contest until he 
heard an announcement on the 
radio and was pleasantly sur- 
prised concerning the outcome. 

This year's ideal professor has 
a variety of interests which keep 
him on a rather tight schedule. 
His favorite pastimes are guns, 
hunting and fishing, but he finds 
time enough for professional or- 
ganizations to "teach and to stay 
up with the students." 

Other interests include read- 
ing numerous mystery novels and 
an assortment of trade journals 
and business-oriented magazines 
to complement his teaching 
interests. 

Johnson believes that the two 
most important teaching devices 
are simply hardline lectures 
with a dash of humor and prac- 
tical demonstrations of the prin- 
ciples being stressed. He ada- 
mantly encourages class partici- 
pation on all levels because he 
feels that this is the "best way 
for students to learn." 

Commenting on the protest 
movements on many college and 
university campuses today, John- 
son said that he was strongly 
against the demonstrations. He 
emphasized that if the students 
were trying to accomplish any- 
thing, or to reach any person, 
"they are certainly going about it 
the wrong way." 

To Johnson, the ideal student 
should have a willingness to 
learn and the ability to get along 
with others. He added that a 
student need not have an extrem- 
ely high mental capacity to suc- 
ceed in college if he did possess 
the other two qualities. John- 
son feels tht a student cannot 
fail to learn if he can boast of 
these attributes providing that 
the material is properly pre- 
sented. 

Johnson has been in the teach- 
ing profession for 15 years. He 
earned his bachelors degree at 
Northwestern where he has been 
a faculty member since 1956. 



Depends on the giant. Actually, some giants are just regular 
kinds of guys. Except bigger. 

And that can be an advantage. 

How? Well, for one thing, you've got more going for 
ycu. Take Ford Motor Company. A giant in an exciting 
and vital business. Thinking giant thoughts. About develop- 
ing Mustang. Cougar. A city car for the future. 

Come to work for this giant and you'll begin to think 
like one. 

Because you're dealing with bigger problems, the 
consequences, of course, will be greater. Your responsibilities 
heavier. That means your experience must be better — more 
complete. And so, you'll get the kind of opportunities only a 
giant can give. 

Giants just naturally seem to attract top professionals. 
Men that you'll be working with and for. And some of that 
talent is bound to rub off. 

Because there's more to do, you'll learn more. In 
more areas. 



You'll develop a talent for making hard'nosed, imagina' 
tive decisions. And you'll know how these decisions affect 
the guts of the operation. At the grass roots. Because you'll 
have been there. 

If you'd like to be a giant yourself, and your better 
ideas are in finance, product engineering, manufacturing, 
marketing and sales, personnel administration or systems 
research, see the man from Ford when he visits your campus. 
Or send your resume to Ford Motor Company, College 
Recruiting Department. 

You and Ford can grow bigger together. 



THE AMERICAN ROAD, DEARBORN, MICHIGAN 
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. 



What's it like 
to work 

for a giant? 



I'd like a big job please. 




Page 4 



iHE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 



Presidential Home To Be Located 
OnCampus 



nome i o oe Locaiea t t • j.i 
GreenNearColiseum Tech Tonight! 



A two-story colonial-style presi- 
dential home will soon be con- 
structed in the spacious area east 
of the College's Administration 
Building facing Chaplin's lake. 

A Natchitoches architectural 
firm designed the home, which 
will be constructed in Greek re- 
vival style in keeping with the 
popular architecture of early 
Louisiana. 

Featured at the front of the 
home will be six Doric columns 
such as the one which supported 
the east gable of the famous Bul- 
lard Mansion in the early 1800's. 
The Bullard columns, standing in 
front of Warren Easton Hall 
where the mansion once stood, 
have become the traditional sym- 
bol for Northwestern. 

Access to the two-story house 
will be by a circular drive off 



South Jefferson Street, which 
runs along the lake. 

Money for the presidental 
home project was allocated seve- 
ral years ago, according to State 
Board of Education member and 
former Northwestern graduate 
Dr. B. M. Woodard of Lake 
Charles, who was interviewed 
Monday by the Current Sauce. 

Funds for renovation and con- 
struction of homes for presidents 
of state colleges and universities 
come from revenue earned on 
oil holdings at Nicholls State 
College which receives half the 
earnings. The other half, stated 
Woodard, is allocated to other 
state colleges over a period of 
time for the purpose of renova- 
tion and construction of presi- 
dential homes. 
Since the project began, 



Nicholls State, McNeese and 
Southwestern have had homes 
constructed for the college presi- 
dent or have had existing homes 
renovated. 

The home presently occupied 
by Kilpatrick and his family was 
built in 1928 and have served as 
the residence of eight Northwest- 
ern presidents. 

When the new home is com- 
pleted, plans call for converting 
the present presidential home 
into a Home Management House 
for use by the Home Economics 
Department. 

The present Home Management 
House, located near the Student 
Union, will be moved along with 
Rebel Hall to make room for 
badly-needed parking lots, Presi- 
dent Kilpatrick said. 



QXt3RibQe 




Part-time Employment 
Need a licensed Beautician 
For information 

contact 
Mr. Jimmy Long 
Phones 
352-5201 or 352-3362 



REWARD. A $50 reward has 
been offered for the capture and 
return of a 15-month old male 
collie missing for the past two 
weeks. The animal weighs approx- 
imately 85 lb, and is the usual 
sable, brown and white. The dog 
is described by the owner as 
being "very friendly and gentle." 
The canine has a silver choke col- 
lar with a green vaccination tag. 
Persons with either the dog or 
information pertaining to his 
whereabouts are asked to contact 
Mr. Bill Scott at his residence, 
216 College Ave. 



Sandefur Jewelers 



First in Jewelry and First in Student Service 



The Jewelers with the 
DEMON touch 



117 St. Denis 



Phone 352-6390 



While in town stop in and browse around 



SATURDAY CONCERT 

Musicians Meet 
In Inter-College 
Band Session 

Conductor of the U. S. Air 
Force Academy Band, Lt. Col. 
Arnald D. Gabriel, will be the 
guest conductor tomorrow and 
Saturday when the College plays 
host to the 1968 Intercollegiate 
Band. 

Some 90 musicians from eight 
state colleges and universities, 
including NSC, make up the In- 
tercollegiate Band, which will 
present a concert Saturday night 
at 7:30 in the Fine Arts Audi- 
torium. 

Rehearsals for the all-collegi- 
ate state band have been set for 
3 p.m. tomorrow, according to 
J. Robert Smith, director of 
Northwestern's bands and co- 
ordinator for the two-day event. 

Guest conductor Col. Gabriel 
has received several military 
awards and has conducted bands 
in Europe and the U. S. before 
being named Commander and 
Conductor of the Air Force Band 
in 1963. 

The only active Air Force 
musician to hold the Legion of 
Merit, Col Gabriel received one 
of the nation's highest peace- 
time awards, The Legion of 
Merit, presented while he was 
Conductor of the U. S. Air Force 
Europe Band, "for improving in- 
ternational relations, through 
music, in 24 countries in Europe, 
North Africa and the Middle 
East. 

Representatives from North- 
western, Centenary College, 
Southwestern, the University of 
Southwestern Louisiana, McNeese 
State, Northeast State, Louisiana 
Tech and Louisiana State Univer- 
sity will attend the two-day con- 
cert session. 




(\\\v- by CHAGALL, 

VJ^ BASKIN, R0UAULT, 
DAUMIER, PICASSO, 
and many others 
-priced from $5. 

I :' • 

Student Union 
Second Floor 
Feb. 13 — 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 

wranwd by 
. RRMMAND TOTW 
ftAUIRIES, 

A BALTIMORE, MD. 



Demons Scalp NLSC Tribe, 
Face La. Techmen Tonight 



by John Keppel 

The Demon basketballers, 
led by a tremendous effort 
by junior James Wyatt, over- 
came the Northeast Indians 
Monday night in Monroe by 
a score of 117-114 in a thrill- 
ing overtime victory. 

In leading the Purple and 
White to its second win over the 
Tribe this season, Wyatt tallied 
31 points and set two school re- 
bound records. He snared 30 re- 
bounds during the game to break 
his old record of 25 that he had 
set last year, which put his sea- 
son's total at 336, shattering the 
old standard of 316, which he 
also established last season. 

The 117 point output by the 
Demons was the highest total' 
scored in Gulf States Conference 
action. The all-time high game 
for them is 125 points, set ag- 
ainst Mississippi College in 1962. 

The Indians had led the con- 
test throughout most of the game 
and were leading by a 52-40 
count at halftime. The North- 
east crew ran their lead to 14 
points as the scond half began, 
and were still atop by 13 with 
only 6:10 left in the squabble. 

However, the Demons lagged 
hind as if they knew exactly 
what they were going to do to 
the Indians all along. They pick- 
ed-away at the NLSC lead little 
by little until but 43 seconds re- 
maining, Pete Gray stole the ball 
and fed Jim Peffer who hooked 
it through the hoop to tie the 
score at 95-95. 

Glynn Saulters, the Northeast 
ace who got 42 points for the 
evening, pushed the Tribe back 



into the lead, 97-95, with 0:21 left, 
but that didn't daunt the De- 
mons, who contentedly drove 
down the court. With only eight 
secnds to go Andy Marusak, the 
unflustered freshman from Vir- 
ginia, lobbed a beautiful shot 
through the rim from far out in 
the corner to send the contest 
into overtime at 97-97. 

The Indians zippedi-ofi ( to a 
four-point lead on two quick 
baskets by Saulters as the extra 
period began, but the Demons 
struck back themselves and went 
ahead to stay with 1:31 to play, 
when sub Johnny Janese inter- 
cepted a pass and drove in for 
a layup to put the Purple and 
White up, 108-109. 

In addition to Wyatt's heroics, 
Jim Peffer, a sophomore from 
Hempfield Pennsylvania, mesh- 
ed a total of 27 markers for the 
night, while Gray added 23 more 
to the Demon cause. 

The squad returns to Prather 
Coliseum tonight for their re- 
turn engagement with the La. 
Tech Bulldogs. The "Animals" 
pulled-out a very narrow decision 
over the Demons earlies in the 
campaign at Ruston, and the De- 
mons would like nothing better 
than a victory this »>vt*ning 
against the arch rivals and their 
7'0 ft. star, Charles Bishop. 

The Demons have improved 
steadily during; their last few 
encounters, and they need the 
support of the student body. We 
strongly urge all students and 
faculty to come to the game to- 
night to rouse our crew on to a 
decisive rout over the Canine 
Invaders from La. Poly. 



How To Study? 



Cramming As An Art 



It was bound to happen. After 
all, this is the age of instant 
coffee, automatic dishwashers 
and TV dinners. Keeping with 
this trend, students have develop- 
ed instant education — sometimes 
known as cramming, comments 
the Collegian, University of the 
Americas, Toluca, Mexico. 

Cramming has been refined to 
an art form, and to cram well 
one must first learn the langu- 
age involved. The Collegian de- 
fined the essential terms this 
way: 

Cram — to jam your head so 
full of facts the night before an 
exam that all this knowledge 
will burst back out all over your 
exam paper. 

To pull an all-nighter— to stay 
up from the time the party breaks 
up until the hour of the exam 
tht next day. This time is usually 
devoted to cramming. 

Bennies — the magic little pill 
that keeps your mind bright 



and clear through the fuzzy-wuzzy 
hours of the morning. 

To pop a pill — the act of drop- 
ping a Benny. 

A Bear — an exam that defies 
cramming. 

Ace it — when the cram pays off. 

Frog (flag) it— when cram- 
ming process fails you, usually 
used in conjuction with a Bear. 

Crack a book— (vulgar) to 
study. 

Who resorts to cramming? 
First, the All American type who 
will later succeed in business 
without really trying. Second, the 
psuedo-intellectual, who spends 
his evenings solving the Vietnam 
war and the racial problem, say- 
ing he's too busy educating him- 
self to worry about class assign- 
ments. Third, believers in the 
philosophy, 'eat, drink, and be 
merry, for tomorrow you may 
die.' Many of them, indeed, find 
they are dead on the day of 
exams. 




Personal 
Posters 

18 x 24 

Send any B&W or Color Photo- 
graph, Negative, Colloge, Draw- 
ing, or Snapshot. All Posters 
B&W. Your original returned. 

Include School Name 

Only $3.75 

plus 25c Handling 

Psychedelic Phot* Co. 

P. O. Rax 3671 
St. Lewis, Mo. 43139 



fhursday, February 8, 1968 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Football Coach Gossett Man Of Many Faces, 
nitiates Athletic Reforms During Season 



Page 5 



By Jerry Pierce 
News Bureau Director 

When Glenn Gossett came 
to Northwestern State Col- 
lege last year as head foot- 
ball coach, he brought with 
him a reputation for getting 
things done. 

Gossett resigned as defensive 
coach at Southern Methodist Uni- 
versity to take the Northwestern 
job, and it prompted a Dallas 
sports columnist to write, "The 
Ponies are losing a class guy, a 
gifted coach of rare energy who 
did three men's work as well as 
three separate men might have 
handled it." 

A review of 
Gossett's first 
year at North- 
western is a 
study of a man 
w,i ti h 




rare 
energy, enthusi- 
asm and a sin- 
cere desire for 
excellence. 
Under Gosset's guidance last 
season the Demons finished with 
a 6-3 record and tied for second 
place in the Gulf States Con- 
ference. But winning football 
seasons are only part of Glenn 
Gossett's dream. 

Most of Gossett's first-year ac- 
complishments at Northwestern 
have never appeared in the 
record books or the newspaper 
columns but they are concrete 
evidence of progress, excellence 
and preparation for the future. 

"I felt that our primary object- 
ive as a new coaching staff," said 
Gossett, "was to do everything 
we could for the young men in 
our program. We wanted to give 
our boys a first-class operation 
from the time they report for 
their first practice session until 
they walk across the stage and 
accept their diploma. We feel the 
foundation has been poured for 
this kind of program." 

One of Gossett's first acts at 
Northwestern was the establish- 
ment of an organized study-aid 
program. He secured qualified 
and dedicated personnel to assist 
Northwestern football players in 
organizing study habits and work- 
ing toward academic excellence. 

Interest in academics is noth- 
ing new for Gossett, who was in 
charge of the study aid program 
at SMU. The value of the pro- 
gram at Northwestern was evi- 
dent at the end of the fall semest- 
er when the team suffered no 
academic casualties. 

Gossett also organized an ex- 
tensive recruiting program and 
saw to it that Demon coaches 
visited in virtually every high 
school in the state. Gossett and 
his staff personally attended 
more than 80 high school games 
during the season and evaluated 
hundreds of high school football 
.films. 

To aid recruiting, he helped 
organize the Demon Club, an or- 
ganization which lends financial 
support to Northwestern's athle- 
tic program and enables the col- 
lege to offer the number of scho- 
lorships allowed under NCAA 
and GSC regulations. 

For the first time in many 
years Northwestern football 
players are enjoying the benefits 
°f an athletic dormitory. Demon 
athletes live in Rapides Hall, a 
ne w, modern, air-conditioned 
building with first-class facilities. 

Gossett installed in his first 
ve ar a highly-organized off-sea- 



STAMP IT! 

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son program, featuring a well- 
equipped weight room which al- 
lows the entire team to go 
through a complete workout in 
just 40 minutes. He also had the 
dressing rooms air-conditioned. 

In the past 12 months, the 
coaching staff has been increased 
making possible more individual 
attention for players both on and 
off the football field. 

For the benefit of the players, 
Gossett has developed an exten- 
sive summer employment pro- 
gram, and during the season he 
set up a weekly award system to 
recognize outstanding perform- 
ances. 

A tough taskmaster, Gossett 
demands respect of his players, 
but he shows respect in return. 
He works diligently to gain 
recognition for members of his 
team. 

Last fall, primarily through 
Gossett's efforts, Northwestern 
had a weekly color television 
show which was seen throughout 
the Ark-La-Tex. During the 10 
weeks of the season, he had 26 
players on the show for guest 
appearances as well as his entire 
coaching staff and members of 
the administration. 

Northwestern also became the 
first Gulf States Conference 
school to use the services of Jim 
Laughead, the nation's leading 
sports photographer. And Gos- 
sett somehow found time to help 
organize the first GSC Sports- 
writers Tour. 

During Gossett's first season 
at Northwestern, home atten- 
dance records were established 
both for a single game and for 
the season. This made it neces- 
sary to increase the seating 
capacity of Demon Stadium. Side- 
line and end zone seats were 
brought in to make room for 
3,000 more fans than ever before. 

Gossett likes to share credit 
for the accomplishments of the 
past year with many people. "The 
success that we have attained in 
the last 12 months could not have 
been possible," he said, "without 
the cooperation and interest of 
President Kilpatrick and the en- 
tire administration, an excellent 
staff of assistants and a group of 
outstanding young men who 
make up the football team." 

Looking to the future, Gossett 
lists as his primary objectives 
an improved schedule, permanent 
expansion of the stadium and 
continuation of programs already 
begun. 

"My first year in Natchitoches 
has passed so rapidly," said Gos- 
sett, "that I have not been able 
to do many things which I hoped 
to. I am looking forward in the 
weeks ahead to getting out and 
becoming better acquainted with 
Demon fans, alumni, faculty 
members and students. I have 
many speaking engagements 
throughout the state which will 
give me an opportunity to tell a 
lot of people why we are all so 
proud of Northwestern and Nat- 
chitoches." 

Glenn Gossttt is a man of 
action. 




GLENN GOSSETT, head Demon football coach, is completing his first 
year at this school after quitting his duties at SMU. Also serving as 
assistant athletic director, Gossett has installed many helpful pro- 
grams around the campus to benefit college athletes. 



Gymnasts To Vie 
Minus Two Stars 
In LSU Dual Meet 

The college gymnestics team, 
minus All-American Richard Loyd 
and Bob Hermeann, will meet 
Louisiana State University tomor" 
row at Baton Rouge in a dual 
meet. 

Coach Armando Vega said that 
Loyd and Hermann, stalwarts on 
Northwestern's defending NAIA 
and AAU national championship 
team, will pass up their college 
competition this spring in order 
to return next year when NSC 
will concentrate on NCAA com- 
petition. 

"We want to give Richard and 
Bob the benefit of NCAA compet- 
ition," Vega said. 

Ten gymnasts, led by John El- 
las and Bob Carrerio, will go a- 
gainst the Tiger team. David Bed- 
ard, Joe Williamson, Richard 
Wadsack, Steve Weber, Jack 
Crawford, Tommy Pocus, Jerry 
Wang and Jay Biggs round out 
the squad making the trip to Ba- 
ton Rouge. 

Northwestern Has captured 
four of five meets so far this sea- 
son, its only loss coming at the 
hands of defending national 
champion Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity. 

Tomorrow's meet is a prelude 
to the Mid-South Championships, 
scheduled for Feb. 17, at North- 
western. 



Faculty Meets Red Heads 
In Fund-Raising Contest 



By Bobby Ardoin 

"The Queen of Big Time Basket- 
ball," the nationally famous all- 
girl Southern Red Head profes- 
sional team, will invade Natchi- 
toches High Gym Tuesday night 
to face the all-men "Wonders", 
composed of faculty members and 
former college basketball players. 

The contest will be sponsored 
by the Olympic Committee in 
order to raise sufficient funds 
to send athletes to the 1968 
World Wames in Mexico City. 

The Red Heads, who have been 
termed "America's most popular 
basketball team," tour the coun- 
try annually in special appear- 
ances against various men squads. 

During their short careers, the 
Red Heads have won 137 of 197 
contests, and feature some of the 
most superior feminine hard 
court talent in the country. 

Coached by Larry Emison, for- 
mer basketball and baseball 
great from Caraway, Ark., the 
Red Heads will be paced by Judy 
Lockhart, an All-American per- 
former in softball and basketball. 

Other members of the squad 
include Betty Everett, a six-foot 
guard from Magee, Miss.; Dora 
Cossey, a six footer from Cara- 
way, Ark.; Wilda Kelley, a set- 
shot artist from Florence, Miss.; 
Mary Emison, a former softball 
star; Pat Rakowitz, a rangy 6-3 
center who specializes in hook 
shots; and Sandy Bishop, a 6-2 
forward from Summerfield, La. 



Providing worthwhile competi- 
tion for the Red Heads will be 
the "Wonders" who earned their 
cognomen simply because of 
their wonderful basketball tal- 
ents. 

Heading the list of masculinity 
is Jimmy Adkins, head of the 
Student Union game area. Joe 
Sampite, basketball coach at St. 
Mary's High School; Jerry "The 
Kid Pierce, head of the college 
News Bureau; Jim Hawthorne, 
local radio announcer; Rick "The 
Flash" Woodson, Sports Publicity 
Director; Buddy Bonnette, Phy- 
sical Education instructor; James 
LaRoue, coach at East Natchito- 
ches Junior High; Ernest Morgan, 
Northwestern Junior High coach; 



Dick Brown, former Demon great, 
and Jim Bruning, head coach at 
Natchitoches High. 

The contest will be played ac- 
cording to men's rules, and will 
begin at 7:30 p.m. 

Prior to the game, the Demon 
Girl's Team will face the females 
from Southern State. Admission 
for the games will be $1.50 for 
adults, and $1.00 for students. 



Need ride to and from Shreve- 
port for class at 12 MWF. 
Please contact Mrs. W. B. By- 
ram, 133 East Robinson St., 
Shreveport. Phone 865-4481. 



Shop 



Gn 



illette Jewelers 



Home of the 



Keepsake Diamond Rings 



Watchmaking and Engraving a Specialty 



582 Front Street 



Phone 352-3166 




Every litter bit hurts 



Trash? Litter? Empties? Don't discard them as you drive! 
Carry a litterbag in your car. Hold everything for the first 
roadside basket or take it home for proper disposal. Re- 
member — our roads and highways belong to all of us. 
Litter spoils your view, menaces highway safety and 
costs tax dollars! Every litter bit hurts . . . YOU. Ameri- 
ca's beauty is your duty. Please help 

KEEP AMERICA BEAUTIFUL 

Published as a public service in cooperation with The Advenisina C 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 




JOHNNY JANESE freshman guard from LaGrange High in Lake 
Charles will provide extra reserve strength on the Demon bench to- 
night when the Demons take the floor against arch rival La. Tech 
in the Coliseum at 7:30 p.m. 



What's it like 

to work 
for a giant? 

Depends on the giant. If the 
giant happens to be Ford Motor 
Company, it can be a distinct 
advantage. See your placement 
director and make an appoint- 
ment to see the man from Ford 
when he is here on : 

February 20 



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Creel And Lovich 
Chosen In Draft 

Two linemen from the 1967 
Demon squad may have a pro- 
fessional football career ahead 
of them as David Lovich and 
Mike Creel were selected in the 
AFL-NFL player draft in New 
York last week. 

Lovich, a 6-3 218 pound defen- 
sive end, was picked by the St. 
Louis Cardinals in the 15th 
round, and Creel was nabbed by 
the Philadelphia Eagles in the 
16th round choosing. Both ball 
clubs participate in the NFL. 

Lovich, a product of New Or- 
leans, was a 1966 coaches' and 
La. Sports Writers Association 
all-GSC selection. 

Creel was a member of the 
Demon forward wall that was in 
part responsible for establishing 
a new school rushing and total 
offensive record. 

Demon head coach Glenn Gos- 
sett said that several other De- 
mon seniors including tackle 
David Dawson are likely to be 
signed as free agents by pro 
teams. 



G.S.C. STANDINGS 



Team 


Won 


Lost 


McNeese 


7 





Southwestern 


6 





Northeast 


4 


4 


La. Tech 


3 


4 


DEMONS 


3 


5 


Southeastern 


1 


4 


Nicholls 





7 



From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 



WE'RE GONNA TRY AGAIN 

To all of you who have returned anew to The Olde Alma 
Mater for one reason or the other (inherent fears of the 
working world, Viet Nam, no proposal of marriage as yet, 
etc., etc.) the Sauce sports staff extends its customary greet- 
ings to each of you, and a hope that you will have another 
prosperous (or lucky) semester (whichever the case may be). 

Now that the footballs have been put away for a month 
or two, the local sports scene appears a bit lifeless, except 
for the Demon basketballers — it is they who, prone to be 
wonderfully efficient one night and woefully elementary the 
next, are dragging through the tail end of another disappoint- 
ing season. The squad has run hot and cold throughout the 
campaign, but most recently has played up to its pre-season 
expectations, even in a couple of losing causes. 

PEFFER AND CREW 

Carrying the brunt of the load thus far have been Jim 
Peffer, Doug Watts and James Wyatt. Those boys have been 
turning in consistently fine performances all along the sched- 
ule. The season slate stands at 7-10, but with a little luck and 
a good night, we should chalk up another win this evening 
against La. Tech. The Demons threw a big shock at the Tech- 
men earlier in the year as they almost dumped the Dogs in 
Ruston. However, the rally fell short and the Polytechnic 
Piddlers pulled out a tranished winner. 

WHERE HAS ALL THE SPIRIT GONE? 

Before the football season had ended, a gross lack of 
spirit had developed among the normally vociferous Demon 
students and supporters. This unfortunate situation has been 
painfully obvious during the roundball season, too. We viv- 
dly remember near chaos breaking out in Prather Coliseum 
at virtually every game in support of a team which had more 
troubles than the present one, and a still poorer record. Cer- 
tainly we are not advocating a return of the Feb., 1967, USL 
"missle crisis" which left Gulf State Conference Commis- 
sioner Stanley Galloway somewhat perturbed (to say the 
least), but we do wonder why the cheering stopped. 

Tonight it's La. Tech, and (although State Fair is the show- 
down in the competing schools' athletic endeavors) be it 
basketball or ping pong, they are our rivals. Nothing is sweet- 
er than a victory over La. Poly, particularly when there is 
little else to get excited about. To the upperclassmen who 
know what NSC-Tech is all about, and to you freshmen who 
aren't quite sure, the sports department urges all of you to 
be in that number tonight and cheer the Demons on to a win. 
And let's not forget the two other remaining home encoun- 
ters with Nicholls State and Houston Baptist. 

AND ALL THE REST 

The poet, it is rumored, once said that in the Spring a 
young man's fancy turns to thoughts of love. But since this 
has become a perfectly natural year-round passtime, athletic 
amusements have developed wherever average Amerncan 
males congregate. 

Thus it is true with a group of men who have gotten North- 
western tremendous national prestige — and that's no exag- 
geration. The great Demon gymnasts, led by Pan-American 
champion Richard Loyd, have unobtrusively but brilliantly 
been engaged in six meets, losing only one to Southern Ill- 
inois University, the major college division champion. The 
Demons will be at home hosting a major meet Feb. 17, which 
the Sauce will cover next issue. 

The defending GSC champion basketball squad will begin 
serious drills in a few weeks, and track season is upon us. 
The tennis and golf teams will be getting into action in the 
coming weeks. And, then, of course, the old standby foot- 
ball will re-appear for spring drills. 



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Demons Dumped 
By 99-86 Count 
In GSC Battle 

After trailing by a slim 
44-42 margin at halftime, the 
McNeese Cowboys poured in 
55 points in second half play 
to overcome a stubborn De- 
mon five, and slip into first 
place in the GSC standings 
before a crowd of 2000 in 
the Coliseum Thursday night. 

Thursday night's win marked 
the 15th straight victory for the 
Cowboys who possess a 16-2 
overall slate, and also gives them 
an unblemished 7-0 record in 
league play. 

Coach Tynes Hildebrand's De- 
mons are now 7-10 for the season, 
and hold a 3-5 record in GSC 
competition. 

Probably the most outstanding 
factor in the Cowboy's victory 
was their ability to hit almost 
flawlessly from the field. Mc- 
Neese shooters hit on 38 of 58 
shots during the contest for a 65 
per cent average. 

On the other hand, the Demon 
shooters sank 30 of 68 attempts 
for a 44 per cent total. 

For the most part, the con- 
test proved to be a seesaw battle 
in which the lead changed hands 
13 times before the Cowboys pull- 
ed ahead to stay with 14:33 re- 
maining in the game. 

McNeese's Ed Green, a 6-3 for- 
ward proved to be the top scorer 
of the night for both teams 
with 29 points. Green, who had 
a mediocre 9.1 average prior to 
the ball game sank 11 of 16 shots 
from the field, and made 7 of 
10 free throws. 

Following Green in the scoring 
column was Dean Glenn who sank 

20 markers during the contest. 
Next for the Cowboys was Kent 
Andrews with 19 points and 
George Boyd with 17. John Haw- 
kins, who entered the contest 
late in the second period had 11. 

The Demon scoring Was led 
by junior Pete Gray who hit for 
26 points. Gray hit 7 of 14 from 
the field, and dumped in 12 of 13 
charity tosses. 

Center Jim Wyatt poured in 

21 points in the losing cause, 
and was high man in the rebound 
repartment on both squads with 
16 grabs. 

Other scorers for the Demons 
were Jim Peffer with 19, Odis 
Faust with 8, and Dougie Watts 
with 5 points. 

The Demons take the floor 
against another GSC foe tonight 
when they meet arch rival La 
Tech at the Coliseum. Tipoff is 
slated for 7:30. 

Gymnasts Win 
At Terre Haute 

Led by almost flawless per- 
formances by Ail-American Rich- 
ard Loyd, the Demon gymnastics 
team swept past Indiana State 
and Arizona State in separate 
dual meets in the Terre Haute, 
Ind. Tournament Thursday night. 

Loyd, who led the Demons to 
national championships in both 
the NAIA and AAU meets last 
spring, took a total of eight first 
places as the Demons won their 
third and fourth meets of the 
season. 

Loyd won the free exercise, side 
horse, parallel bars, and All- 
Round events in both meets. 

The Demons concluded a tour 
through the Midwest with three 
victories and only one loss tJ 
NCSS champion Southern Illint,^- 



College Manors 

College Avenue at Robeline Street 

One and two bedroom apartments 

Now Open for Renting 
Call L. A. Newman at 352-3169 or 352-3170 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 1 



Karate Club Sports Black Belt Specialists, 
Offers Instruction In Complex Art Of Defense 




SMALL AND FAST Joyce Wade, 
a sophomore from DeRidder, 
takes stance ready to oppose any 
unknowing attacker. Joyce de- 
monstrates the art with timing 
and self control rather than on 
shear strength. For details of the 
club, call George Eaton, presi- 
dent, at 352-8601. 

Faculty Briefs 

Dr. Tom H. Wells, associate 
professor of history, is the 
author of a book published last 
month by the University of Geor- 
gia Press. 

Entitled, "The Slave Ship Wan- 
derer," the book attempts to un- 
tangle the web of deliberately 
confused evidence surrounding 
the last successful introduction 
of slaves from Africa into the 
United States. 

Wells, a veteran of 25 years 
Naval duty, including command 
of a destroyer in \he Korean 
War, combines thorough schol- 
arship with a good sea story to 
produce what reviewers call "an 
interesting and historically sig- 
nificant book." 

Wells, a native of Austin, Tex., 
was graduated from the U.S. Nav- 
al Academy in 1940 and received 
his master's and doctor's degree 
from Emory University. 



Dr. W. G. Erwin, head of the 
department of biological scien- 
ces, has been selected to serve 
on a national committee to study 
standards for teaching high sch- 
ool and junior college biology. 

The National Association of 
Biology Teachers ch'ose Erwin 
to work on the committee of 
selected educators from through- 
out the nation to survey stand- 
ards and establish guidlines for 
the teaching of biology. 



John Raush, assistant director 
of bands and instructor of per- 
cussion, conducted a percussion 
clinic in the auditorium of Wer- 
lein's Music Store in New Or- 
leans recently. The clinic was 
sponsored by the music company 
and was open to all band direct- 



By Wooten 

"Karate is a means of molding 
personality. It is a mental, moral 
and physical culture based upon 
a unique martial art. The purpose 
is not and never has been one 
of aggression. It is most import- 
ant that students train morals 
along with technique." 

With this in mind, instructor 
Pat Harrington projects an 
atmosphere of learning and con- 
fidence into the training sessions 
of the school's newly-formed 
Karate Club. 

Students of Karate are taught 
to trust and respect both the 
instructor and each other. This is 
symbolized by the bow before 
and after training or actual com- 
bat. 

The Northwestern club has ap- 
proximately forty members on 
roll, meeting Thursday at 6 p.m. 
in the women's gym. The co- 
educational classes train for two 
hours, and are becoming effective 
with Knowledge, timing, and self 
strength. 

Makami, head instructor from 
Japan, is sixth black belt and 
three times Karate World Champ- 
ion. Makami attends the class 
once a month to instruct and 
test for belts of rank. 

Anyone interested is invited 
out, and membership will be 
open for a limited time at a 
date to be announced. Member- 
ship includes the privilege of 
working with the Shreveport 
Karate Club. 

Officers of the club are Presi- 
dent George Eaton, Vice-Presi- 
dent Joyce Wade, Secretary Ruth 
Brown, and Treasurer Butch 
Brown. 

ors and interested students. 

Raush, a native of Chicago, 
received his bachelor's degree 
from Northwestern. 



Dr. Rene Bienvenu. dean of 
arts and sciences, has been sel- 
ected by the Naitional Science 
Foundation to serve as a review 
panel chairman. 

Bienvenu and four other scien- 
tists will be in Atlanta, Ga., Feb. 
22-23 to review proposals for 
support requested of the NSF. 

More than 50 proposals under 
the Instructional Scientific Eq- 
uipment Program of the NSF 
will be studied by Bienvenu and 
other panel members. 



Melvin Stevens, assistnt pro- 
fessor of agriculture, has been 
granted a faculty fellowship for 
advance study by the National 
Science Foundation. 

Chosen from hundreds of ap- 
plicants, Stevens will recieve 
$11,000 to attend the college or 
university of his choice. In ad- 
dition, the institution which Ste- 
vens attends will receive up to 
$2,500 for equipment and sup- 
plies used by Stevens in his doc- 
toral degree program. 

Stevens plans to attend Louisi- 
ana State University in Baton 
Rouge to work toward a doctor- 
ate in agronomy. 

A graduate of the University 
of Arkansas, he received his mas- 
ter's degree in agriculture from 
LSU in 1956. 

He has been a member of the 
College faculty for six years and 
previously taught for six years 
at Southern State College in Ark- 
ansas and for 10 years in Arkan- 
sas high schools. 



Latest Styles for Spring now being offered at 

Billid 

House of Beauty 

By Dot Brungart, formerly of Modelette of Shreveport 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 




SMILING BUT DANGEROUS . . . Karate Black Belts (left to right) 
Golding, Makami and Harrington share honors training the approxi- 
mately 40 members of the newly formed club. Golding instructs the 
Shreveport Karate Club, and Makami, from Japan, attends class once 
a month to instruct and to test for belts of rank. 



Minutes of SGA 



SGA Minutes 
December 18/ 1967 

President Dennis Newbi^:y called 
the meeting to order. Th group had 
prayer and said the Pleadge of Allegi- 
ance. Minutes were read and approved. 
Rolled called. Absent were Vestal, 
Baker, Bella, Precht, Ramsey, Butler, 
B. Fowler, and Burns. Late was M. 
Fowler. 

Rispoli reported that the Student 
Services Committee suggested some 
type of NSC calendar for student's 
benefit. Dean Fulton suggested a 
large monthly calendar be placed in 
the Student Union. 

The questionnaires are being tabu- 
lated and results will be reported at 
a later date. 

The NSC highway signs have been 
checked into. The committee is await- 
ing results from the State highway 
dept. 

Committee meeting were announced. 

President Newbury recommended 
that NSC take an active part in 
"Choice 68" to be held on April 24, 
1968. A large groups of colleges and 
universities will vote on presidential 
candidates and other officials. There 
are to be 2,000,000 students partici- 
pating. Several Louisiana colleges are 
planning to take part. Financing and 
publicity will be by Time magazine. 
The purpose of this survey is to give 
the people an idea of how the college 
students feels about politics. Maxwell 
moved the recommendation be accepted. 
Seconded by Ferrera. Question called 
by Gray. Motion carried. 

The Student Union Committee has 
suggested that the crests of various 
organizations be placed in the Student 
Union. It was discussed and decided 
that a sort of school emblems be pre 
sented by the SGA rather than a 
crest. Ferrrea moved that the matter 
of a school crest be referred to Skin- 
ner and the Public Relations Commit- 
tee. Seconded by Rispoli. Landry Call- 
ed for question. Motion carried. 

A Freshman Board will be estab- 
lished and its function will be to eval- 
uate Freshman Orientation and find 
out how they feel about it, to bring 
back suggestions to the SGA about 
any problems the freshmen may have 
and to keep in close communication 
with the class as a whole. 

It was brought to the attention of 
the group that recruitment of inter- 
ested SGA H. S students for NSC is 
needed. Maxwell stated that the fresh- 
men interested in government, etc., 
should be invited to the summer pre- 
school workshop. The, when they came 
to school, more interest would be 
aroused. Appointments were made for 
this purpose. 

Maxwell moved that the cheer- 
leaders turn in their resignations if 
they are not going to cheer. Seconded 
by Ferrera. KervU called for question. 
Thirteen (13) voted for the motion and 
three (3) voted against it. Motion car- 
ried. 



Maxwell moved that the amendment 
in the Demon Hanndbook, Sec. 2, No. 
2 be changed to read "A sweater on 
having served for a second year as 
cheerleader." Seconded by Ferrera. 
After a discussion, Ferrera withdrew 
his second. 

Rispoli moved that committee be 
appointed to evaluate the amount of 
money being spent on the School 
Spirit Trophies. Lowe Seconded. Ques- 
tion called by Maxwell. Seven (7) voted 
for the motion and twelve (12) voted 
against the motion. Motion failed. 

Maxwell moved the meeting be ad- 
journed. Seconded by Townsend. Ques- 
tion called by Gary. Motion carried. 
Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Jan Warren, Secretary of SGA 

January 8, 1968 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. Precht led the group 
in prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance 
was said. Minutes were read and ap- 
proved. Roll was called. Absent were 
Vestal, Durbin, Bella, Bates , Landry, 
Lowe, Butler, Townsend, and Ferrera. 

Rispoli reported that he had talked 
with Mr. Joe for plans in the spring 
which include donut machines and 
hot chocolate machines in the cafeteria 
for the spring semester. He stated 
that the utensils are being cleaned 
and checked. Mr. Joe has also separat- 
ed the chairs and tables in the cafe- 
teria to help solve the seating prob- 
lem. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

Maxwell gave the treasurer's report. 
Balance was $3,459.16 which did not in- 
clude December. 

The second SUSGA Conference will 
be held at Hammond on February 23-24. 
The Executive Committee decided that 
five (5) delegates from NSC sholdr at- 
tend the conference. Names were taken 
down of those wishing to make the 
trip. 

The committee on Communications 
was appointed. The function of this 
committee will be to improve com- 
munications between the students and 
the SGA. 

Fowler reported that the Ray Charles 
contract has been confirmed. 

The next regular meeting of the 
SGA will be on Feb. 5, 1968 at 6:00 p.m. 

Kevill moved the meeting be adjourn- 
ed. Seconded by Precht. Motion car- 
ried. Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Jan Warren, 
Secretary of SGA 

Any male college student inter- 
ested in participating in varsity 
tennis during the spring semester, 
is advised to report ready for 
practice to the t'ennis courts 5 .. 
Mondays at 3 p.m. Coaching the 
squad for the coming season will 
be Joe Layman. 



Holiday Cleaners 

One day Service on Dry Cleaning 

Laundry Service 
Pants and Shirts in by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning by 9 out by 5 
In Friday Morning after 9 out Monday by 5 

706 College Avenue 
Conveniently located near the campus 



ALSO — visit the 

One-Hour Martinizing Cleaners 

Broadmoor Shopping Center 
SUPER-FAST SERVICE 



Literature Contest 
To Be Sponsored 
By Women's Club 

Students interested in creative 
writing are urged to enter a liter- 
ary contest sponsored by a Nat- 
chitoches women's organization, 
the Lesche Club. 

Cash awards of $15, $10, and 
$5 will be presented to authors 
of winning contributions in the 
contest's three catagories, poetry, 
prose and drama. There is no 
limit to the number of entries 
that may be submitted, but all 
entries must be in by March 1. 

Campus students may submit 
their entries to faculty members 
Mrs. Corinne Ryland and Dr. 
Edna West, members of the 
Lesche Club. 

Scuba Divers Plan 
Spring Activities 

The scuba-diving club will re- 
cieve its charter as an active 
campus organization this semes- 
ter. Having completed several 
trips to Florida, Arkansas, and 
Lake Bistineau near Shreveport, 
the club is now planning the 
present semester's activities. 

Ample equipment is available 
and those male and female stu- 
dents interested in scuba diving 
are cordially invited to attend 
the organizational planning meet- 
ings set for alternate Tuesdays 
throughout the semester. One 
may also contact Coach Howe, 
faculty advisor; Kenny Cochran, 
president; or Butch Summerlin, 
vice-president. 




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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 8, 1968 




SOCIAL SYMBOLS — Members of Sigma Tau Gamma, men's social 
fraternity, pose with a painted insigna before its installation in the 
Student Union cafeteria. Frats and sororities, as well as other campus 
groups, are preparing crests like this one for display. 

New Officers To Head 
Greek Organizations 



NSC's social sororities and fra- 
ternities have announced their 
officers for the spring semester. 

Elected to serve as presidents 
of the organizations were Lela 
Mae Lea, Pride, Alpha Sigma 
Alpha; Cheryl Terry, Shreveport, 
Delta Zeta; Mary Vacca, Shreve- 
port. Phi Mu; Annette Wallace, 
Sigma Kappa; Lynda Lawrence, 
Alexandria, Sigma Sigma Sigma; 
Lester Dalme, Bossier City, 
Kappa Sigma; Jere Daye, Shreve- 
port, Kappa Alpha; Joe Callaway, 
Shreveport, Sigma Tau Gamma; 
William Austin, Metairie, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon; and Tommy Fer- 
guson, New Orleans, Pi Kappa 
Phi. 

Other officers are: 

Alpha Sigma Alpha— Ann Gray, 
Shreveport, vice-president; Ann 
Hargis, Natchitoches, secretary; 
and Sandra Helms, Natchitoches, 
treasurer. 

Phi Mu — Linda Cunningham, 

Uniques To Play 
For Winter Ball 
In Union Saturday 

The Winter Ball, an all-college 
formal, will be held Saturday 
night in the Student Union Ball- 
room at -ight o'clock. 

Daphana Smith, a junior and 
this year's Winter Ball queen, 
will be presented with her court. 
Besides queen Daphana, the court 
consists of Trudy Bates, a sopho- 
more; juniors Linda Bacon, Louise 
Riehl, and Sandra Liberto; and 
seniors Wanda Willis, Jan Warren 
and Paula Wright. 

The band featured will be the 
"Uniques" who have played for 
several college dances in the past 
The "Uniques" are known nation- 
ally for such recordings as "Not 
Too Long Ago" and "All These 
Things". 



DeRidder, vice-president; Sally 
Wells, Natchitoches, secretary; 
and Phyllis Brasher, Lake Charles 
treasurer. 

Sigma Kappa— Connie Hebert, 
Sulphur, vice-president; Donna 
Middleton, Annandale, Va., secre- 
tary; and Judy Smith Morgan 
City, treasurer. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma — Sue Peter- 
son, Norfolk, Va., vice-president, 
Cheryl Wood, Shreveport, secre- 
tary; and Jean Ann Riley, Dallas, 
Tex., treasurer. 

Kappa Sigma — B e n Cooper, 
Shreveport, vice-president; Jimmy 
Coco, Shreveport, secretary; and 
Gary Rosto, Natchitoches, trea- 
surer. 

Kappa Alpha— Dickie Robert- 
son, Shreveport, vjce-president; 
Wayne Branton, Gretna, secre- 
ary; Larry Lieux, New Roads, 
treasurer. 

Sigma Tau Gamma— David But- 
ler, Alexandria, vice-president; 
Dale Magee, Shreveport, secre- 
tary; and Jim Granich, Port Sul- 
phur, treasurer. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon— Michael 
Millwee, DeQuincey, vice-presi- 
dent; Albert Lewis, Yazoo City, 
Miss., secretary; and Glen Ste- 
phens, Alexandria, treasurer. 

Pi Kappa Phi— Freddie Litton, 
George Mandeville, Bossier City, 
treasurer. 



Philosophy Club 
To Resume Talks 

The first meeting of North- 
western's newly organized Phi- 
losophy Club will be held Febru 
ary 15 from 7-9:30 p.m. in Room 
316 of the Student Union. 

Club spokesmen said that 
meetings will be scheduled for 
the first and third Thursdays of 
each month. Philosophy instruc- 
tor David Crawford, the club's 
discussion director, has report- 
ed that notable speakers from 
various college departments will 
be scheduled to speak at the 
meetings. 



TOWNHOUSE TEXACO 
SERVICE STATION 

offers all NSC Students 
a 2c discount on gasoline per gallon 



Located next to Townhouse Restaurant 



'Dark At Top Cast Is Announced; 
Braden, Martini n Dramatic Leads 



A tentative cast has been an- 
nounced for the College Theatre 
spring production of William 
Inge's comedy-drama "The Dark 
at the Top of the Stairs." 

The announcement was made 
Tuesday by director Marc Petta- 
way of the speech faculty after 
tryouts in the Little Theatre. 

Leading the cast will be senior 
speech major John Braden of 
Natchitoches and junior speech 
major Nancy Martin of Lake 
Charles in the roles of Rubin and 
Cora Flood. Susie Chancey, 
speech and journalism major of 

College First In 
New Program 
Of Education 

Speaking ealier this week in 
references to the school's newest 
innovation in higher education 
in a continuously expanding sys- 
tem, a doctoral degree program, 
President Arnold R. Kilpatrick 
said that "the response has been 
even greater than we expected." 

The College was granted per- 
mission in December by the State 
Board of Education to begin of- 
fering the doctoral degree pro- 
grams next fall in education. 

More than 150 application re- 
quests and letters of inquiry have 
been received from 10 states 
since the first announcement of 
the new program, according to 
Dean Leo T. Allbritten, Dean of 
the Graduate School. 

Administrators at the school 
have begun preliminary prepa- 
ration for what is expected to 
be a large influx into the Gradu- 
ate School during the summer 
and fall semesters. 

"In addition to the many new 
students who have expressed an 
interest in the doctoral program," 
advised Dr. Kilpatrick, "we now 
have 200 students who are en- 
rolled in the Specialist Degree 
program (the Specialist Degree 
is 30 hours beyond the Master's 
Degree), many of whom we ex- 
pect will go into our doctoral 
program." 

The College produces the 
second largest number of gradu- 
ates in Louisiana in the field of 
education. This is one reason why 
the hoped-for enrollment should 
be very high. Dr. Kilpatrick em- 
phasized this point when he said, 
"It is reasonable to assume that 
a great number of our graduates 
who received Master's Degrees 
in education will return to 
Northwestern to work toward ad- 
vanced degrees." 

Enrollment in the Graduate 
School exceeded 1300 this fall 
making it the largest of any of 
the state colleges. Of that total 
1,10 were in education. Last sum- 
mer, the post-graduate school 



DeQuincy, will play a leading 
role as Lottie Lacey. 

Ten year old Cal Schexnider of 
Natchitoches is cast as "Sonny," 
and speech major Leah Rivers 
completes the Flood family group 
as Reenie. Junior Byron Nail of 
Metairie will play Sammy Gold- 
enbaum. 

Also featured in the cast are 
Robert Cox as Morris Lacey, 
Sheri Saloff as Flirt Conray, and 
Russell Luker as a newsboy. 

Assistant to the director for 
the production is Bruce Kalman. 



College Budget 
Gains Approva 

The Northwestern State Col- 
lege operating appropiations 
budget for t|he 1968-69 fiscal 
year has been approved by the 
State Board of Education. Presi- 
dent Kilpatrick cited the new 
figure at $7,605,789, a 22.8 per- 
cent increase over the current 
fiscal year. 

Using a standardized, three- 
facet computation, the State 
Board awarded Northwestern its 
full implementation. Upon its 
request, the college also was 
allocated the $614,305 compen- 
sation for the state's failure to 
complete full budget payments 
in the current fiscal year. 

The radical increase in state 
funds requested was, in part, an 
attempt by the college to meet 
the added expense of an all-time 
high enrollment of 6,331 students 
with an increase of 1,128 students 
over the fall of 1966. 

The State Board of Education 
must now place its request for 
the fullfillment of the North- 
western budget and that of all 
other state colleges and univer- 
sities before the State Legislature 
in May. 

surpassed even Louisiana State 
University's enrollment in fields 
of education. 

The school had become (in 
1954) the first state college to 
be authorized to confer Master's 
Degrees. Presently, the school 
has awarded more that 1,350 
Master's Degrees, of which there 
were 1,244 in education. 

"More than one-third of our 
faculty members have doctor's 
degrees at this time, and many 
others will be completing their 
doctoral work in the next year," 
said Kilpatrick. 

After the completion of the 
new Arts and Sciences Building, 
expected to be ready sometime 
during the present semester, the 
College will have the largest 
classroom buiding on any college 
or university campus in the state. 
The four-story complex is being 
constructed at a cost of $3.2 mil- 
lion. 



Let 



Styles, Styles, Styles 

Billia # House of Beauty ^ 

you in STYLE for Spring 
Call on the following operators: 



Dot Brungart 
Irma Lowrey 
Sue Regions 
Tressie Sneed 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 



"Dark at the Top of the Stairs" 
will be presented March 5, 7 and 
8 in the Little Theatre. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
Sat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Tonight through 
Saturday 



Michael Caine 
Jane Fonda 
'Hurry Sundown" 
Color 

Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 

Eli Wallach 
Ann Jackson 
in the comedy hit 
"The Tiger 
Makes Out" 
Color 

Starts Wednesday 

Jody McCrea 
Jock Mahoney 
"The Glory 
Stompers" 
Color 



CH I EF 

D R I VE- 1 ! N 



Last Time Tonight 

James MacArthur 

Susan Oliver 
"The Love-Ins" 
Color 

Saturday Only 

Stewart Granger 
"Red Dragon" 
— Co-Feature — 
Sandra Dee 
George Hamilton 
"Doctor You've Got 
To Be Kidding" 

Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 

Haley Mills 
John Mills 
Hywel Bennett 
"The Family Way" 
Color 

Wednesday 
Buck Night 

Sonny & Cher 
"Good Times" 

Color 
— Co-Feature — 
James Garner 
Julie Andrews 
"Emily" 



Drug Forum 



See Page 2 




urre 



s 



auce 



Trio Review 

See Page 8 



Vol. LVI— No. 17 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Thursday, February 15, 1968 



Fair Named VP 

SGA Prexy Shuts 
In Face Of Public, 



Doors 
Press 



By The Sauce Editorial Staff 

The Student Government 
Association illegally exclud- 
ed non-voting associates, Cur- 
rent Sauce reporters, and 
several other students from 
the general meeting Monday 
evening, while they debated 
and voted on the appoint- 
ment of a new student body 
vice president. 

Senior agri-business major 
Jamie Fair was approved by a 
vote of 17-2 in an unconstitution- 
al closed session which lasted one 
hour and ten minutes. The press 
and non-voting observers were 
instructed to leave the session 
by SGA President Dennis New- 
bury moments after the meeting 
convened at 6 p.m. 

"They have no right to send 
any student out of a general 
meeting," Dean Dudley Fulton 



told Sauce reporters in a tele- 
phone conversation at 6:15 p.m. 
Fulton, advisor for the council, 
was not present at the meeting, 
but was represented by his as- 
sistant, graduate student Tommy 
Keys. Keys was also sent out of 
the meeting, 

Newbury explained his action 
as the removal of "outside in- 
fluences on the voting." 

NO ADMITTANCE 

In spite of guarantees in the 
student body constitution that all 
•general SGA meetings shall be 
public and that "it shall be the 
duty of the editor to see that a 
staff reporter is present at all 
SGA sessions" (Article XI, Sec- 
tion 2), neither Sauce Editor 
Diane Nickerson nor the staff 
members accompaning her were 
allowed admittance to the con- 
ference room. 

Newbury told reporters that 



Candidates Named 
For AWS Elections 



The Associated Women 
Students at Northwestern 
State College will elect new 
officers during all-day ballot- 
ing Tuesday. 

Twenty coeds have been nomi- 
nated for the organization's 
eight offices. Campaign speeches 
will be given Monday at 7 p.m. 
in the Student Union Ballroom, 
and voting will be on the second 
floor of the Student Union from 
8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tuesday. 

All women living on campus 
are eligible to vote. The new 
officers will assume their duties 
in April. 

Mary Bernard of Natchitoches 
and Edith DeWitt of Alexandria 
will be running for the president 
and vice-president positions. The 
one receiving the most votes will 
be president, and the other will 
assume the vice-presidency. 

Other nominees are: 

Intercollegiate AWS Represen- 
tative, Patricia Green, sophomore 
business major, Jeanerette; Lynda 
Henderson, sophomore social 
studies major, Winnfield; Patty e 
Robinson, sophomore business 
education major, Bossier City. 

Corresponding Secretary, Mai 



Dixon, freshman nursing major, 
Natchitoches; Linda Hollings- 
worth, junior social studies ma- 
jor, Alexandria; Christine Reed, 
freshman home economics major, 
Alexandria; 

Recording Secretary, Karen 
Butler, freshman social studies 
major, Alexandria; Janet Church- 
man, freshman medical technol- 
ogy major, DeRidder; Anna Davis, 
freshman English major, Shreve- 
port. 

Social Chairman, Anne Mat- 
thews, junior anthropology major, 
Raceland; Marjorie Padula, sop- 
homore social studies major, Bos- 
sier City; Kathryn Posey, junior 
primary education major, Mans- 
field. 

Treasurer, Fran Arnona, fresh- 
man physical education, New Or- 
leans; Ethel Gibson, freshman 
medical technology major, Cou- 
shatta; Cynthia Osborne, sopho- 
more business education major, 
Grand Cane. 

Publicity Chairman, Marsha 
Bella, freshman government ma- 
jor, Berwick; Karen Karisny, 
sophomore are education major, 
Ball; Cheryl Shaub, junior upper 
elementary major, Haughton. 





during the closed session his pre- 
liminary nomination of Dave 
Faraldo to the office of vice 
president failed to receive coun- 
cil approval by a vote of 13-6. 
The council then approved New- 
bury's original appointment of 
Fair, which failed last Week by 
a vote of 11-8. 

Sauce Campus Editor Charles 
Skinner, w/ho remained at the 
meeting in his voting capacity as 
president of the junior class, re- 
ports that Newbury explained 
during the closed session why 
Faraldo was his "second choice" 
for the vice-presidency. Faraldo's 
resignation from his position as 
state SUSGA enterainment chair- 
man last spring, Skinner points 
out, was one of the reasons cited. 

The ostracized students return- 
ed to the meeting at 7:15 p.m. 
to hear committee reports from 
Freshman Board Chairman David 
Precht, Student Services head 
Tony Rispoli, Elections Board 
Chairman Henry Burns, and Stu- 
dent Body Treasurer Scotty Max- 
well. 

IN ON SOMETHING 

Quipping that the SGA should 
"finally let the Current Sauce 
in on something," Maxwell re- 
viewed the Sauce budget for 
1967-68 and presented it to the 
council. The budget, which in- 
cludes an addition of one scholar- 
ship for student staff members, 
was unanimously approved. 

Maxwell later announced his 
decision to become a candidate 
for the SUSGA chairmanship, 
and received unanimous endorse- 
ment from his fellow SGA of- 
ficers. 

Grad student Keys, formerly 
vice president of the LSU stu- 
dent body, explained the "Choice 
'68" elections program, which 
will be conducted in conjuction 
with similar programs in colleges 
throughout the United States. 
Northwestern was invited, Keys 
reported, by Time magazine to 
participate in an election April 
24 on certain referendum ques- 
tions and possible presidential 
candidates for 1968. 

The council also accepted the 
resignation of Senior Class Pres- 
ident John Eamsey for reasons of 
Class conflicts with SGA sche- 
dules, and that of Gaylon Landry, 
junior class vice-president, for 
personal reasons. 




VIETNAMESE BEAUTY— Twenty-two-year-old NSC coed Tran Thi 
Yuy Ngoc, nicnamed Jo-Jo, says she "likes American clothes and food 
and just everything." In this picture she wars a Vietnamese dress 
with a long-sleeved tunic slit from hem to waist. See story on Page 4. 



CIRCLE K PROGRAM 



Local Stores To Extend Discounts 
To Participating NSC Consumers 



By Vickie Weible 

Through the efforts of the 
Circle K Club, student dis- 
count cards will go on sale 
Monday. The cards, priced 
at $1, may be purchased 
from Circle K members in 
a booth outside the Student 
Union Bookstore. 

The reason for initiating the 
card discount system, according 
to Circle K Pres. Wayne Branton, 
is that since so many college stu- 
dents are doing business with 
the town merchants, the mer- 
chants "owe something" to the 



students. By giving this discount, 
the merchants are able to show 
their appreciation. 

Branton also said that the pro- 
fits the club receives from the 
sales will be used for campus 
service projects, possible scholar- 
ship funds, and community ser- 
vices. 

A student owning one of the 
cards will be given a discount 
when he trades with the follow- 
ing merchants: 

Holmes Record Shop, 3% on 

all items 

(See Discounts, Page 8) 



Campus Participation Is Planned 
n 'Choice '68' Experimental Poll 

_. . .. , i__n_4 .1 „^,„Mo thncp in nositions of nation; 



IN THE UNION — Members of the Union committies and other stu- 
dents relax after a session of plan-making for upcoming SU activities. 
Included on the spring semester roster of events are movie showings, 
ar t and novelty exhibits, and Union dances. 



By Charles Skinner 

Approximately two million 
college students, previously 
voiceless, will command 
national attention in the 
presidental primary for col- 
lege students, "Choice '68." 
This election will be adminis- 
tered loyally by the Student 
Government Association. 

The SGA will be responsible 
for obtaining maximum student 
participation, providing financial 
support, and regulating the elec- 
tion on the campus in accordance 
with the regulations set by the 
Board of Directors. 

The Board of Directors will 
establish basic guidelines for the 
presidential primary, design the 



national ballot, and provide 
national leadership and direction. 
The board is composed of eleven 
student leaders representing dif- 
ferent geographical locations and 
all types of campuses. 

The poll is hoped not only to 
provide an outlet for college en- 
thusiasms, but should merit na- 
tional attention and consideration 
as well-informed students make 
their views known not only con- 
cerning presidential preference, 
but also concerning other much 
debated national and internation- 
al issues. 

It is hoped that "Choice '68" 
will result in a heightened politi- 
cal awareness among students 
and promote a greater dialogue 
between college students and 



those in positions of national 
leadership. 

SGA President Dennis New- 
bury has stated that one of the 
principal activities of the SGA 
in the coming semester will be 
the taking active participation 
in "Choice '68." 

Other schools in the state which 
have pioneered this presidential 
primary are Louisiana Polytech- 
nic Institute, Louisiana State 
University, Northeast Louisiana 
State College, Southern Univer- 
sity, Tulane University, and the 
University of Southwestern Lou- 
isiana. 

Participation in the program 
is open to every college, univer- 
sity and junior college in the 
nation. 



Page 2 



Editorial 1 . 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 15, 1968 



Illegality And The SGA 



The Student Government Association 
unconstitutionally met in an illegal session 
Monday night for one hour and ten minutes. 
During this time all non-voting SGA mem- 
bers and three Current Sauce staff editors 
were excluded from the meeting by orders 
of Student Body President Dennis Newbury. 

Newbury had ordered all non-voting 
members from the meeting so that the exec- 
utive officers could act on the selection of 
a new vice-president to fill the vacancy 
created last semester with the resignation 
of Vice-President Bill Fowler. 

The special session, called only minutes 
after the meeting opened, was designed, 
stated Newbury, so that each SGA member 
could speak openly without fear of being 
misquoted in the Current Sauce and with- 
out pressure from "outside sources." 

When a student government member 
is elected — be he class secretary or SGA 
president — he must remember that he is 
a representative of the students and must 
reflect the opinions of the students. As a 
representative, he, just like a United States 
Congressman or Senator, is responsible to 
his electorate and must answer to his pub- 
lic. Each vote that he casts should and 
must be made public for he is voting not 
just for himself but for hundreds of stu- 
dents. Every student has the right to know 
what his representative says in a public 
meeting, as well as how he votes. 

If a student government representative 
is not willing to have his opinions printed 
in the student newspaper, he should never 
even consider seeking election to an SGA 
office. 

Newbury's order that the press and 
others be barred from the special session 
was totally unconstitutional according to 



The Two Faces Of Drugs 



The Current Sauce extends its thanks 
to the Campus Security, the Natchitoches 
Sheriff's Department, the state troopers, 
and inmates of the state penal system for 
their joint effort in revealing the poisonous 
absurdity of the plastic world of society 
economics, and politics and, in contrast, the 
anecdotic beauty and aesthetic goodness in 
the flowery world of Love and Drugs. 

Chester Rout and Norman Parish, nar- 
cotic addicts from Angola, addressed a 
crowd of 350 persons in the Fine Arts Aud- 
itorium this Monday night. While here 
under the auspices of a Narcotics Forum, 
the two speakers drawled away at their 
tragic existance which had been ruined by 
their insatiable desire for drugs. Amidst 
audience flurries of applause and choral 
"Amens," the young men reflected on the 
past in tragic discourse guaranteed to re- 
substantiate the moorings of the surface- 
seeking majority. 

Yet, there were some people in the 
house who saw the dominant underlying 
cause for the addicts' drug usage; they saw, 
through the young men's eyes, the disen- 
chantment, disinterest, and disgust with a 
society of which they refused to become a 
part. 

Here lies the essence of their Love-like 
realization. They alienated themselves 
from inadequate educational systems, 



blind-faith followers of blind leaders, gov- 
ernmental hypocrites, war-mongers, and a 
double moral standard. They refused to 
participate in the sucking, stabbing, ulcer- 
ating climb to "make the buck." They re- 
fused to vote in an election with no candi- 
date. They refused to accept without ques- 
tion the words of the Elders. God knows 
that this, in itself, is grounds for imprison- 
ment. 

Yet, they couldn't quite leap the gap be- 
tween the beautiful worid and the plastic 
world. They found escape through hard 
addictive drugs and not enlightnment 
through the sophisticated drugs of Haight- 
Ashbury, D.C., and New Mexico Flats. The 
economical aspect of their adventure be- 
came a torment. They stole and violated 
pharmaceutical laws instead of finding the 
gr ^ ov !„ of stree t-begging, poster-painting, 
and affluent friends to "turn you on " 

They were arrested and had traumatic 
nang-ups and come-downs while in prison 
Yet, many Flower People have mastered 
Hindu meditation, which transposes them 
into a pure and perfect oneness with a cell, 
steel bars, and the entire universe — and 
everything is groovy. 

One feels sorry and grieved for their 
failure, but can appreciate their bloody rev- 
elation on the right and the wrong way to 
"Drop Out." J 



the bylaws of the student body constitution. 
First the document specifies in Article XI, 
Section 2 that "it shall be the duty of the 
editor to see that a staff reporter is present 
at all SGA sessions and that these sessions 
are reported in the Current Sauce in order 
that all members of the Association can 
know of the official action of the governing 
body." This article, alone, should have pre- 
vented the expulsion of the Sauce editors. 

Though the constitution does provide 
for special meetings, SGA President New- 
bury did not follow the provision allowing 
for such a session. Article V, Section 2 
states, "all meetings of the Government 
Association shall be public except when a 
majority of the Association deem it necess- 
ary to go into executive session." Newbury 
did not ask the members to vote for an 
executive session, nor did any member 
come forth to request such a vote. 

It seems awfully irregular that not one 
single SGA member objected to Newbury's 
unusual actions Monday night. Of all the 
members present, not one made any pro- 
test whatsoever to the president's actions. 

Perhaps, you say, this was because each 
member had been prewarned that an exec- 
utive session was planned — unfortunately, 
this was not the case. Newbury, who called 
the special meeting, was the only one who 
knew of the private session. 

The damage has already been done. 
The SGA has closed its doors to the public 
and cast its ballots in secret, thus shat- 
tering the basic tenets of democracy — free- 
dom of speech and freedom of the press. 
All that we can do now is suggest that the 
SGA adhere to its constitution so that, in 
the future, the governing body will be able 
to operate effectively and have the com- 
plete cooperation of the student body 



QXtiRiOQe 




1 MORNING FRIEND!. 



Letter t The Editor 



To The Editor: 

Are we really going to be re- 
quired to attend classes on Tues- 
day, February 27 — with Mardi 
Gras and, glorious, erdtic and 
unbelievable New Orleans only 
250 miles away? LSU's BR & NO, 
Nicholls State, Southwestern and 
Southeastern all are off com- 
pletely. Northeast at least has a 
Mardi Gras ball, McNeese gets off 
two days for a rodeo, leaving 
only the two old state Baptist 
schools (us and Tech) without 
any sort of revelry. After all, 
Fat Tuesday (or Mardi Gras) is , 
a Christian festival to commemo- 
rate the final day of feasting and 
fun before the fasting, penitence 
and abstinence period of Lent 
begins on Ash Wednesday, the 
day after Mardi Gras. 

This rule requiring students 
to attend classes on Mardi Gras 
seems unfair because it deprives 
many students of the privilege of 
seeing the "Greatest Free Show 
on Earth" in person. This is par- \ 



ticularly true of students who 
may live in say, California or 
New York. Besides these facts, 
many students will cut classes 
anyway in order to attend. Of 
course those who do not choose 
to go to New Orleans could go 
to class or maybe just have a 
day off to catch-up on back work 
or term papers. 

This writer feels that the 
school could at least look into 
this situation — it wouldn't hurt 
anyway. 

John H. Keppel 



UNION MOVIE 

The Student Union will sponsor 
the movie "CAT BALLOU" on 
Feb. 22 and 23. The two showings 
will be at 3 and 7 p.m. in the 
Ballroom. Admission charges will 
be 25c for students. 



National Ballet Gives 
Classic Performance 



It's What's Happening 



Friday, February 16 

High School Speech Tournament, Stu- 
dent Union, All Day. 

La. Invitational Basketball Tournament 
Coliseum, 4 p.m. 

Saturday, February 17 

High School Speech Tournament, SU, 
All Day 

Sigma Alpha Iota State Day, All Day 
Little Theater 

Sigma Alpha Iota Luncheon, SU 269- 
270, Noon. 

Invitational Basketball Tournament 
Coliseum, All Day. 



Sunday, February 18 

North Louisiana Historical Associ- 
ation, SU Ballroom, 2:30 p m 
Library Meeting, SU 241, 2:30 p m 
Monday, February 19 

AWS Election, SU Ballroom, 6 p.m 
SGA Meeting, SU Conference Room, 
6 p.m. 
Tuesday, February 20 

Guidance Conference, Student Union, 
All Day 

AMS Meeting, SGA Room, 7pm 
Phi Delta Kappa, SU 269-270, Noon 
Demon Divers Meeting, SU 313, 6pm 
Wednesday, February 21 

Band Concert, SU Ballroom, 7:30 p m 



By Kit Kittrell 

A bit of the enchantment and 
aesthetic beauty in the classic 
artistry of the National Ballet 
found its way to the soul of the 
large, newly-enlightened audience 
of Natchitoches as they viewed 
the troupe's second production 
in our area last Thursday. 

"Serenade," a classic study 
brought to production, typified 
the genius of Blanchine and the 
pure art of beauty through uni- 
son. A crescendo of over-head 
carries high-lighted the finale of 
the first selection. 

Undoubtedly, the stimulating 
energy of Jean-Paul Comeline 
and the pert grace of his at- 
tractive partner made the folk 
"pas de deux" overcome the Ring- 
ling Bros, stylism. 

Comeline's informal passing of 
the house's applause to the sob- 
er, sterile aloofness of the 
met with clinched batons 
bows but nearly brough|t 
house to their feet. 

"Four Temperaments," the 
third item on the program, was 
a prime example of the dual 
talents of the lead dancers, for, 
while experimenting in modern 
dance interpretation, the exercis- 
ed a coalition with the classic 
ballet form. 

The final performance, "Con 
Amore," by Rossini, was a light 



and comical exhibition of the 
troupe's talent at appearing eas- 
ed and relaxed as they comically 
scampered through varied scenes 
from Rossini's popular dual-plot- 
ted "pas de comicale." 



urrant S^ur^ 



ESTABLISHED lt14 



Pit 
and 
the 



x,^ iff ** »»*ond «!*•» miner at tba 
Natchitoches Peat Office cuter the eet 
of March 3. 1879. Paetiahed weeeOr ei 
cept durins kelidars ud teat weafc*. In 
the fall and aortas, aaut Vi trufcM at the 
summer br the Btadeot tod; tJ -i.rlb- 
-eetern Mat. Crikc .t I^Wiaiin. 
cnption S3 Mm rear parable u hImn. 



Member ef the Aoeeriatod Celle 



mii^ aI i "SP"* •n'y opinion, of 

"**" Thm ? *<> "< in- 
flect the opinjoas a* the .tadent body 
or the admnUatr.Me. and fa.ulr/ «f the 



Diane iVickerson .... Bdltor 

Jim O'Quinn Manaiing Editor 

Wayne Bran ton Bueinee. Manager 

Ai iaroie Aeeoe. Buaineee Manager 

v-A, ir s £i nn » r C.mpu. Baiter 

Suns 1 Chancer Profreader 

u!L "7^ •• Co-Sporte Bditor 

Bobby Ardoia. Comport. Bailor 

Jerrj Pieree r.eeltr AdTiaor 

Keportere: Jaatee Ceoauu. Jaaaee Darts. 
Pam lfareaatet. Jaaaee Walker Bdward 
T^ompw,,. P.tay Arm**. Liada T.wrj, 
Sid Turner. «H*ee* Maxwell*. Jack 

^Z^wXSL •***• *™»" Tea. Mar. 
Ann Wee t eeu a ad taraa* Kiddle. 

Atm Brnetea "« . 

e» No 



^-Thu rsday, February 15, 1968 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 3 



D'Avanzo Takes Staff On Tour Of 
Large-Scale Dining Hall Facilities 



Cartons upon cartons of mash- 
ed potatoes, rows of canned vege- 
tables and sacks of onions corn 
meal, rice and sugar fill the 
cafeteria storerooms housing 
enough food for 7000 meals a 
day, 30 days a month. 

All this food is needed in the 
preparation of the meals for stu- 



dents eating in Iberville Dining 
Hall stated Joe D'Avanzo, direc- 
tor of food service, as he led a 
group of Current Sauce staffers 
on a tour of the cafeteria last 
Wednesday. 

While touring thefacilities of 
the dining hall, the staff in- 
inspected the frozen food lockers, 




SOME LIKE 'EM HOT — Student Service Committee Chairman Tony 
Rispoli (left) confers with Food Services Director "Mr. Joe" D'Avanzo 
across an enormous vat of steaming green beans. The machinery 
keeps food hot in volume during serving to the student body. 



food storage rooms and the food 
preparation areas. 

The evening meal was being 
prepared by' the cafeteria staff 
while the tour was in progress so 
staff members were able to see 
the mammoth grills, ovens and 
streamers in operation. The 
steamers, large 40 gallon vats, 
can cook and heat vegetables in 
just five seconds. 

D'Avanzo, who assumed the 
management of the two student 
cafeterias in Spring 1966, has 
initiated numerous improvements 
in the dining halls within the 
past two years. Coke and milk 
machanies have been installed, 
and wider selections and varie- 
ties of foods are now being of- 
fered due to changes adopted by 
D'Avanzo and his staff. 

TWELVE BELOW — Iberville 
workers congregate in the Demon 
Deep-freeze. Here huge heaps of 
frozen meat are stored at a con- 
sistent temperature of -12 degre- 
es F., until preparation for serv- 
ing begins. The cavernous meat 
lockers have electrical release 
systems to prevent workers from 
being trapped inside. 




Teacher's Exam 
Will Be Given 
Locally April 6 

National Teachers Examina- 
tions will be given here April 6, 
according to Dr. Tandy McElwee, 
director of Testing and Guidance. 

Deadline for regular registra- 
tion for the tests will be March 
15, and a $3 late registration fee 
will be charged after this date. 

Four Louisiana parish school 
systems require applicants to 
submit scores, and 14 states use 
the scores for certification and 
related purposes. 

The tests consist of a Common 
Examination to measure profes- 
sio nal and general education, and 
a Teaching Area Examination to 
measure mastery of a specific 
subject area. 

Further information and regis- 
trational forms may be obtained 
from the Office of Testing and 
Guidance, Northwestern State 
College. 

Placement Office 
Sets Interviews 

Four business concerns will 
be in he Placement Office this 
week to interview seniors inter- 
ested in prospective employment. 

Thursday electronics majors 
and those having 13 hours of 
math, physics, chemistry, or en- 
gineering will have an opportun- 
ity to discuss employment with 
a representative from Keesler 
Air Force Base in Mississippi. 

Tuesday a representative of 
the Ford Motor Company will in- 
terview students interested in 
employment in the Shreve-port 
area or other areas the Ford 
Company has business concerns. 

Also on Tuesday education ma- 
jors may discuss employment 
with two representatives seeking 
prospective teachers for Neder- 
land and Brazosport (Freeport), 
Texas. 

Interviews may be made at the 
placement office in the union or 
Phone 357-5621. 



Depends on the giant. Actually, some giants are just regular 
kinds of guys. Except bigger. 

And that can be an advantage. 

How? Well, for one thing, you've got more going for 
you. Take Ford Motor Company. A giant in an exciting 
and vital business. Thinking giant thoughts. About market- 
ing Mustang. Cougar. A city car for the future. _ 

Come to work for this giant and you'll begin to think 

like one. , 

Because you're dealing with bigger problems, the 
consequences, of course, will be greater. Your responsibilities 
heavier. That means your experience must be better— more 
complete. And so, you'll get the kind of opportunities only a 
giant can give. . 

Giants just naturally seem to attract top professionals. 
Men that you'll be working with, and for. Marketing and 
sales pros working hard to accelerate your advancement. 
Because there's more to do, you'll learn more. In more 



areas. You may handle as many as three different assignments 
in your first two years. 

You'll develop a talent for making hard-nosed, imagina' 
tive decisions. And you'll know how these decisions affect 
the guts of the operation. At the grass roots. Because you'll 
have been there. , 

If you'd like to be a giant yourself, and you ve got 
better ideas in marketing and sales, see the man from Ford 
when he visits your campus. Or send your resume to Ford 
Motor Company, College Recruiting Department. 

You and Ford can grow bigger together. 




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Page 4 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 15, 1968 



For Young Coed 

Viet Language Class 
Is Tough Assignment 



Spring Concert Band 
To Perform In Union 



Petite, vivacious, ambitious 
Miss Tran Thi Tuy Ngoc, nick- 
named Jo-Jo (because Ngoc seem- 
ed difficult for her friends to pro- 
nounce) is already a teacher as 
well as a student. Next summer 
she will face her toughest assign- 
ment so far — teaching Vietna- 
mese to enlisted men at the Ft. 
Polk Education Center. 

Colonel Daniel E. Lynch arrang 
ed for Jo-Jo to be sponsored by 
the Leesville Rotary Club and 
for her enrollment in NSC after 



Send any B&W or Color 
Photograph, Negative, Col- 
lage, Drawing or Snapshot 

Only 3.75 

plus 25c handling 

All Posters B&W 
2 weeks delivery 
Your original returned 
Include School Name 
Psychedelic Photo Co. 

P. O. Box 3071 
St. Louis, Mo. 63130 



her father, Colonel Tran Ba, 
Vietnamese regimental comman- 
der, expressed a desire for his 
daughter to go to school in Amer- 
ica. 

Jo-Jo will have her degree in 
business administration in Janu- 
ary, 1969, after only three years 
at NSC. When she arrived at 
school, Jo-Jo had already had one 
year of university work in the 
Republic of Vietnam, but most of 
her credits were not accepted 
here. Because of this fact and her 
slight knowledge of the English 
language, her goal seemed almost 
unattainable 

Even with perfected English, 
getting a degree in three years 
would be a major project for any 
student. 



The college symphonic band 
will present a midwinter concert 
Wednesday Feb. 21 at 7:30 in the 
Student Union ballroom. It will 
be the first formal concert of the 
symphonic band. 

The band, directed by J. Robert 
Smith, will perform a variety of 
numbers. Compositions incluge 
"Chicago Tribune," a march; 
"French Festival," a tone picture; 
"Trittico" by Vaclave Nelhybel, 
an extremely modern piece of 
band literature; and "Second 
Prelude" by George Gershin. 

Other pieces are "Carnival of 
Venice" with variation for three 
trumpets arranged by Don Jacoby, 
"The Man of La Mancha", and 
an "American Folk Dance Suite." 
The precussion ensemble, recent- 



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Join a firm that'll 
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first day at work. 




Now, that's a pretty funny thing for a 
civilian firm to say. A boss ? Right out of 
college? The first day? 

Butthe Air Force can make such offers. 

As an officer in the world's largest 
technological organization you're a 
leader. Engineer.Scientist. Administrator. 
Right where the Space Age break- 
throughs are happening. 

Or how about the executive respon- 
sibility of a test pilot clocking 2,062 mph 
in a YF-12A jet? 

That could be you, too. 

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Air Force to move fast. With your college 
degree you zip into Officer Training 
School, spin out an officer, speed on 
your way as an executive, in the fore- 
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Right on the ground. 

The Air Force moves pretty fast. 

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ly back from a clinic performance 
in New Orleans will also perform 
under the direction of John 
Raush. 

The concert is free to the pub- 
lic. 



SWIMMING TIME 

The Spring 1968 recreational 
swimming schedule went into ef- 
fect early and will continue till 
Friday, May 24. 

The hours that the pool will 
be open are: 

Monday-Wednesday, 6:00 to 
8:00 — Women only. 

Tuesday-Friday, 6:00 to 8:00 — 
Men only. 

Thursday night, 6:00 to 8:00— 
Neptune Club. 

Saturday-Sunday, 2:00 to 3:00 
—Women only. 3 : 00-4 : 00— Men 
only. 



Annual Forensic Tourney Scheduled 
This Week-End; Schexnider To Direct 



The thirty-first annual Demon 
Forensic Tournament will occupy 
the facilities of the Student Un- 
ion Ballroom as thirty-four high 
schools from Louisiana and one 
from Texas converge on the cam- 
pus tomorrow and Saturday. 

Among returning speech tour- 
ney favorites are Lake Charles 
and C.E. Byrd High Schools of 
Shreveport The lone out-of-state 
entry is Vier, Texas High. 

The areas of competition of- 
fered are drama/it interpreta- 
tion, extemporaneous speaking, 
television newscasting, story tell- 
ing, and debate. 

This year's events include an- 
revitalized dramatic interpreta- 
tion. According (to tournament 
director Ray Schexnider of the 
Speech Department, the most 
popular division in the annual 



television news- 
are twenty-eight 



affair is the 
casting. There 

entries at present in this area. 

There are four divisions in all 
the different events of competi- 
tion, and junior and senior classes 
in each of the men's and women's 
events. 

A special emphasis is being 
placed on comfort for the com- 
petitors this year. A preview of 
the forthcoming production of 
''Dark at the Top of the Stairs" 
is listed as one of the main at- 
tractions for the tournament. A 
movie is also expecjted to be 
shown for the forensic attenders' 
entertainment. 

College students enrolled in 
Speech 101 will assist in organ- 
izing the tournament and will 
also post results and time of vari- 
ous events. 



Ka 
He 



□pa Alpha Meet 
d in Student Union 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Kappa Alpha celebrated Con- 
vivium this week with the cere- 
mony held Monday night in the 
Student Union Ballroom. 

After this celebration of the 
birthday of Robert E. Lee and 
the founding of the Order, the 
KA's began growing their beards 
for the annual "Old South" fes- 
tivities, to be held April 26-28. 

The active chapter of Kappa 
Alpha is very proud of its pledge 
class this semester. Twenty of 
the twenty-five ipledges qualif- 
ied scholastically for initiation. 
These twenty pledges had a 
grade point average of more than 
a 2.4 with David Shaw having a 
perfect 4.0. 



treasurer; Barbara Slack, regis- 
trar; Londa Hollingsworth, sen- 
ior panhellenic delegate; and 
Jan Mancuso, rush chairman. 



PI KAPPA PHI 

Phi Kappa Phi Fraternity has 
increased its roll of actives to 30 
Friday after initiating five new 
members. Tjhey Were David 
Sanders, Donnie Myers, Bill 
Hatcher, Stan Russell and Syl- 
vanus Thaddeus (Dick) Howell HI. 

Officers for this school term 
are; Tommy Ferguson, president; 
Larry Gracie, secretary; Paul 
Jeansonne, treasurer; Chris 
Dacolas, warden; Tommy Tynes, 
historian; and Lynn (Choo-Choo) 
Dalton, chaplian. 



SIGMA KAPPA 

The Delta Mu Chapter of Sig- 
ma Kappa sorority has set March 
9 as the initiation date for their 
fall pledges. A total of 12 girls 
will join the ranks of the Sigma 
Kappa actives. 

Officers for the Chapter this 
semester are: Connie Jones, pres- 
ident; Becky Smith, first vice- 
president; Gidget Maxwell, sec- 
ond vice-president; Donna Mid- 
dleton, recording secretary; Mar- 
garet Atchinson, corresponding 
secretary and assistant pledge 
trainer; Kathleen Eddlemon, 



Officers listed for the Greek 
organizations in last week's pa- 
per were incorrect. Spring sem- 
ester officers are: 

Kappa Alpha — Jere Day, presi- 
dent; Mike Tingle, vice-president; 
Wayne Branton, recording secre- 
tary; Al Savoie, corresponding 
secretary; Bob Herrmann, histor- 
ian; Larry Lieux, treasurer; Jim 
MaGee, parliamentarian; Tony 
Howes, doorkeeper, and Don 
Welsh, sergeant at arms. 

Sigma Tau Gamma — Bill 
Swartz, president; Russ Gielow, 
vice-president; Bob Nida, secre- 
tary; Cecil Campbell, treasurer; 
Mike Waller, pledge trainer; 
Paul Piatt, corresponding secre- 
tary; Jim Knapp, rush chairman; 
George Gray, parliamentarian; 
Dave Williams, sergeant at arms; 
and Stan Parham, chaplain. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma — Linda 
Lawrence, president; Sue Peter- 
son, vice-president; Loretta Lake- 
ly, secretary; Cheryl Woods, cor- 
responding secretary; Ann Davy, 
keeper of the grades; and Jean 
Ann Riley, treasurer. 

Phi Mu — Mary Vacca, presi- 
dent; Linda Cunningham, vice- 
president; Sally Wells, recording 
secretary; Jo Lynn Kilpatrick, 
corresponding secretary; Karen 
Austin, parliamentarian; and 
Beth Leach, rush chairman. 

Officers listed last week for 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity were re- 
ported to be correct. 

Delta Zeta Sorority will hold 
elections for new officers within 
the next two weeks. 

No list of officers was turned 
in by Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorori- 
ty or Tau Kappa Epsilon Fra- 
ternity. 



Let 



Billies' House of Beauty ^ 



you in STYLE for Spring 



Call on the following operators: Dot Brungart, 
Irma Lowery, Sue Regions, and Billia 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 



Thursday, February 15, 1968 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 




Page 5 



Top U.S. Gymnast To Vie 
At Annual Mid-South Meet 



REACH FOR THE SKY— Demon guard Jim Peffer (24) attempts to 
haul in a stray shot in the Tech game as it bounces off the back- 
board. Battling Peffer for the ball are Bulldogs Wayne Smith(31), 
and George Corley (13). Watching the action is the Demon's Odis 
Faust (42). 

Bulldogs Wrecked 
In Prather Coliseum 



By Bobby Ardoin 

Relying mainly on the ac- 
curate shooting of forwards 
Pete Gray and Odis Faust, 
the Demon basketball team 
jumped to an early lead over 
arch rival La. Tech, then held 
on to preserve a 97-89 GSC 
victory in a Coliseum en- 
counter Thursday night. 

The hard fought win proved 
significant allowing the Demons 
to garner their second straight 
conference contest, and enabling 
them to become the sole posses- 
sors of third place in league 
standings. 

Gray and Faust proved to be 
the most prolific scorers in the 
night's action, totaling 58 points 
between them. 

Gray, a 6-1 forward from Mar- 
thaville sank 30 markers making 
12 of 14 attempts from the field, 
and proved equally accurate at 
the foul line hitting on six of 
eight charity tosses. 

Faust, who secured a starting 
position during mid-season, 
pumped in 28 points from his 
corner position, and proved flaw- 
less at the foul line hitting on all 
four tries. 

Faust also proved valuable on 
the rebounding boards grabbing 
nine enemy tosses that failed to 
hit the basket. 

Following Gray and Faust in 
the scoring column was junior 
center James Wyatt, who bucket- 
ed 24 markers. Wyatt was tops in 
the rebounding department for 



the Demons hauling in 19 stray 
Canine shots. 

Other individual scorers were 
Dougie Watts with seven, Jim 
Peffer with five, and Johnny 
Janese, with three points. 

Observing the teams statistics, 
the Demons made 38 of 74 at- 
tempts from the field for a 53 
per cent average, and sank 21 of 
27 free throws for a 78 per cent 
norm. 

Malcolm Smith managed 28 
points in a losing effort for the 
Canine scoring honors, and was 
followed by Jim Pruett with 14. 

Charley Bishop, the Bulldogs' 
7-0 center pursued the pack with 
13, and was followed by sopho- 
more Wayne Smith who scored 
nine after entering the game in 
the second period. 

Tech team totals showed the 
rangy wrecks from Ruston mak- 
ing 37 of 77 field attempts, and 
15 of 18 free throws. 

Probably the most important 
factor in the Demons victory was 
their ability to surge to a de- 
cisive first quarter lead, and 
never allow the pursuing Bull- 
dogs to come within threatening 
range. 

Halftime statistics showed the 
Demons with a 51-38 lead, with 
the closest Tech point deficit 
being eight points in the second 
period. 

The Demons face another stern 
task tonight when they face the 
Nicholls State Colonels at the 
Coliseum. Game time is 7:30. 



By James Walker 

The top-ranked Demon 
gymnastics team, fresh from 
a big victory over LSU, are 
host for one of the oldest and 
biggest meets in the South 
Saturday when approximate- 
ly 150 contestants, compris- 
ing 10 teams meet in the an- 
nual Mid-South AAU Gym- " 
nasties Championships. 

Such perennial powers a s 
Northeast State, LSU, South- 
western and Texas A&M will en- 
ter teams, while several indi- 
viduals from major college 
champion Southern Illinois, the 
only team to defeat the Demons 
this year, are entered. 

Coach Armado Vego's Demons, 
minus their two brightest stars, 
Ail-American Richard Loyd and 
Bob Herrmann, managed a bril- 
liant 1-2-3 sweep in the trampo- 
line from Richard Wadsack, Joe 
Williamson and Steve Weber to 
give them the edge for a narrow, 
174-172 victory over LSU Satur- 
day. 

The pair will miss the NAIA 
championships in Kansas City in 
April when the Demons defend 
their title, but both will com- 
pete in May when the Demons 
lay their AAU championship on 
the line in Los Angeles against 
such powers as UCLA, Southern 
Cal and Penn State. 

With Loyd, a definite Olympic 
threat, and Herrmann out of 
NCAA competition, the bulk of 
the team load will fall to talent- 
ed sophomore John Ellas, junior 
Bob Correro and junior Dave Bed- 
dard. 

Ellas came up with three sec- 
onds and a first Saturday against 
LSU, while Correro took first 
place in the rings and high bar, 
and Beddard won the side horse. 
F ollowing Saturday's Mid-South 
meet, the Demons will travel to 
Monroe to take on Northeast in 
a dual meet before the NAIA 
championships. The team's sea- 
son ends with the AAU champ- 



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ionships but Loyd and Ellas will 
compete in the Olympic trials, 
with Loyd almost a certainty to 
make the team. 

Vega is in his first year at the 
helm of the Demons, after three 
years as coach of the Mexican 
National Team. 

The Demon mentor was a mem- 



Gray Gets Going 

The fortunes of the Demon 
baskteball team have been sud- 
denly enhanced by the superb 
performance of junior forward 
Peter Gray. 

Gray, a 6-1 sharpshooter from 
Marthaville is the Demons' second 
top point scorer so far this season 
averaging 17.2 points per game, 
and sinking at least 25 markers 
in his last six court appearances. 

Gray's emergence into the hard 
court limelight seems ironical 
since he appeared in only 12 
games last year, scoring 23 points 
during the whole season. 



mat's it like 

to work 
for a giant? 

Depends on the giant. If the 
giant happens to be Ford Motor 
Company, it can be a distinct 
advantage. See your placement 
director and make an appoint- 
ment to see the man from Ford 
when he is here on: 

February 20 



I'd like a big job please 




ber of the 1956, 1960 and 1964 
U. S. Olympic teams, and gained 
all-american honors while lead- 
ing Penn State to three national 
championships in 1957, 1958 and 
1959. 

Preliminaries in the Mid-South 
meet will be held at 1:30 p.m., 
with the finals slated for 7:30. 




On Campus 

(By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!", 
"Dobie Gillis," etc.) 



with 
MaxShuIman 



MORNINGS AT SEVEN. . . AND 
THERE'S NOTHING YOU CAN DO 
ABOUT IT 

Any man who says morning is the best time of day is 
either a liar or a meadow lark. 

There is only one way to make morning enjoyable: 
sleep till noon. Failing that, the very best you can do is to 
make morning tolerable. This, I am pleased to report, is 
possible if you will follow three simple rules: 

1. Shave properly. 

By shaving properly I mean shaving quietly. Don t use 
a blade that whines and complains. Morning being a time 
of clanger and anger, use a blade that neither clangs nor 
angs. Use a blade that makes no din on your chin, no 
squeak on your cheek, no howl on your jowl, no rip on 
your lip, no waves while it shaves. Use, in short, Personna 
Super Stainless Steel Blades. 

I have been shaving for 71 years (not too impressive 
until one considers that I am 49 years old) and I am here 
to tell you that the quietest blade I know is Personna. I not 
only shave with Personna, but I also admire it. Old vir- 
tues reappear in Personna; old values are reborn. Per- 
sonna is a modest blade, an undemanding blade. Personna 
does not rasp and tug, yelling, "Hey, lookit me!" No, sir, 
not Personna! Silently, respectfully, unobtrusively, Per- 
sonna whisks your whiskers with nary a whisper. It 
shucks your soil and stubble without toil and trouble. 
Why, you hardly know it's there, this well-bred Personna 
blade, this paragon of punctilio. 

Moreover, this crown of the blade-maker's art, this 
epitome of epidermal efficacy, is available both in Double- 
edge style and Injector style. Do your kisser a favor : get 
some. 

2. Breakfast properly. 

I assert that a Personna shave is the best of all possible 
shaves. But I do not assert that a Personna shave, brac- 
ing though it may be, is enough to prepare you for the 
hideous forenoon ahead. After shaving you must eat an 
ample breakfast. 

Take, for example, the case of Basil Metabolism, a soph- 
omore at VM.I. Basil, knowing there was to be an inspec- 
tion by the Commandant one morning, prepared by stor- 
ing up energy. He recognized that coffee and juice would 
not sustain him, so he had a flitch of bacon, a clutch of 
eggs, a batch of bagels, a notch of ham, a bunch of butter, 
a swatch of grits, a hutch of honey, a patch of jelly, a 
thatch of jam, a twitch of pepper, and a pinch of salt. 




The idea was right ; the quantities, alas, were not. When 
the Commandant arrived, Basil, alas, was so torpid that 
he could not raise his bloated arm in a proper salute. He 
was, of course, immediately shot by a firing squad. Today, 
a perforated man, he earns a meagre living as a collander 
in Cleveland. 

S. Read properly. 

Always read the paper at breakfast. It inhibits bolting. 
But do not read the front page. That is full of bad, acid- 
making news. Read a more pleasant part of the paper— 
the Home and Garden section, for example. 

For instance, in my local paper, The Westport Peasant, 
there is a delightful column called "Ask Harry Home- 
spun" which fairly bristles with bucolic wisdom and 
many an earthy chuckle. I quote some questions and 
answers : 

Q: I am thinking of buying some power tools. What 
should I get first? 
A : Hospitalization. 
Q : How do you get rid of moles f 
A : Pave the lawn. 

Q: What is the best way to put a wide ear in a narrow 
garage ? 
A: Butter it. 

Q: What do you do for elm blight? 
A : Salt water gargle and bed rest. 
Q: What can I do for dry hair? 
A: Get a wet hat. 

• • • ©1*8. Mmi ShBkMa 

Personnels partner in shaving comfort is Burma- 
Shave, regular or menthol. Together, Personna and 
Burma-Shave make a considerable contribution toward 
forenoon survival. 



Page 6 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, p. 






WAYNE LEE, 5-10 guard, will provide the extra strength the Demons 
need if they are to secure a victory over rival Nicholls State tonight. 
Game time is set for 7:30 p.m. 




All You Need Is Love 

After all, it's what mokes the world go 'round in 
that wonderful, once-in-a-lifetime way. The en- 
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your love . . . and should it be a Keepsake, the 
word is "perfect." A brilliant diamond of fine 
color and modem cut guaranteed perfect (or 
replacement assured) . Just look for the name 
Keepsake, in the ring and on the tag at your 
Keepsake Jeweler's store. He's in the yellow pages 
under "Jewelers." 



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From Down Under 

With Jay Keppel 

A Proud Night 

After the surging Demon cagers had zipped-away to a 
10-point lead in the opening minutes of the game against 
arch rival La. Tech last Thursday at Prather Coliseum, they 
were treated to a resounding standing ovation after the 
Canines called a time-out in an attempt to break the Demon's 
streak. 

This was perhaps the finest display of school spirit which 
has been evidenced all year. It was the kind of moment when 
you were tremendously proud to be a Demon. 

There can be no doubt in this writer's mind that those 
few moments were an immense psychological boost to our 
team. As they hustled toward the sidelines for the short rest, 
many of them appeared awed at the reception from their 
fans, and when they returned to the heat of the action, one 
knew just which was the superior of the two squads. The 
Demons left no doubt. 

The red-hot Purple and White hoopsters have now run 
their season's slate to 9-10 including 5-5 in conference games. 
Pacing the team overall this year has been the redoubtable 
James Wyatt, a junior from little Belmont. Wyatt is cur- 
rently leading the squad in total points, with 407 (all stats 
are recorded as of the Monday afternoon deadline, USL ex- 
cluded); he is also setting the scoring pace by sporting a 
21.4 average, as well as running away with rebounding 
honors having grabbed 355 for a 17.8 average. 

Close behind Wyatt are Pete Gray and Jim Peffer with 
scoring averages of 17.8 and 15.9 respectively. Wyatt also 
holds all of the single game highs for the season. These in- 
clude most points scored; most field goals scored; most free 
throws made; most free throws attempted; and the highest 
number of rebounds (30). 

The roundballers return to the friendly confines of the 
Coliseum tonight to wage battle against the other NSC in 
Louisiana, the Nicholls State College Colonels, a team which 
the Demons thrashed earlier this year in Thibodeaux, by 
a 91-77 count. 

The sports staff once again urges all of you to be at 
the contest and to bring along some of that "Tech-type" 
spirit which you displayed last week. Our squad has been 
improving steadily, and they are deserving of our applause 
and cheers. 

Odds and Ends 

If you happen to be a basketball buff, we'd like to call 
your attention to the basketball tournament which is to be 
staged here tomorrow and Saturday in both the Men's Gym 
and the Coliseum. It will feature 10 of the finest girl's basket- 
ball squads in the entire South. Admission is free, and our 
own "Darling Damsels of Demonland" are serving as the 
host (actually "hostess") team. 

Also on the local sports scene is the annual Mid-South 
Gymnastics Meet which will be held in Prather Coliseum 
all-day Saturday. The meet will feature many of the most 
prolific gymnasts in the country, headed of course by the 
reigning NAIA and AAU champion Demons. 

Also on the agenda for the 23rd and 24th of February 
is the annual indoor track meet sponsored by the Graduate 
"N" Club. The high schools' run the first night while the 
collegians will take to the floor for the second night's action. 
Northwestern has the only indoor track in the state. 

It is to be pointed out that this event is not a school- 
sponsored affair. The "N" Club has to pay rental fees etc., 
for the use of the "Roof" and therefore must charge ad 
mission. 

The very small cost will be $.75 each night. 



Sandefur Jewelers 



First in Jewelry and First in Student Service 



The Jewelers with the 



DEMON touch 



117 St. Denis 



Phone 352-6390 



While in town stop in and browse around 




CENTER JAMES WYATT mil be 
a prominent factor in tonight's 
contest agaisst Nicholls State Col- 
lege in the Coliseum. The junior 
post is tops in the rebounding de- 
partment for the Demons, and is 
their leading scorer with a 21.2 
average. 

Women's Tourney 
Begins Tomorrow 

Thirteen women's teams will 
vie for honors in the annual Col- 
lege Women's Invitational Basket 
ball Tournament scheduled for 
Friday and Saturday on campus. 

Joan Cronan, head coach of the 
Demon team stated that the 
largest turnout in the meet's 
history is expected. 

Action will begin at 2:00 p.m. 
Friday afternoon, with games 
slated for both the Men's Gym- 
nasium and Prather Coliseum. 

Teams entered in the meet 
thus far are Northeast, Nicholls 
State, USL, McNeese, and the 
Demons. 

Other schools include Stephen 
F. Austin, LSU, LSUNO, William 
Carey of Hattesburg, Miss., the 
University of Southern Missis- 
sippi, and Centenary. 

Powerful Sam Houston State 
will return to defend the title 
that it won last year, but South- 
ern State of Magnolia, Ark., is 
rated as a top threat to dethrone 
Sam Houston. 

The Demon females completed 
their weekend action with wins 
over Centenary, 63-15, and the 
hosts freshman squad 61-33. 

Two members of the Demons 
squad, Phyllis Love and Donna 
Crawford, were named to the all- 
tournament-team. Other members 
of the squad, Jane Green, Dianne 
Thomas, Susan Cartwright, Nancy 
Bonnette, Fern Martin, Pat Tau- 
zin, Marcie ELkins, Julia Parker, 
Sharon Bartlett, Judy Bright, 
Carolyn Comer and Chris Buck. 



Part-time Employment 
Need a licensed Beautician 
For information 

contact 
Mr. Jimmy Long 
Phones 
352-5201 or 352-3362 



Thursday, February 15, 1968 
— — 

Set For March 15 

Craig Spence 
Talk Is Again 
Rescheduled 

Craig Spence, special cor- 
respondent for the Mutual 
Broadcasting System, will 
address an all-college assem- 
bly in <he Fine Arts Audito- 
rium Friday, March 15, at 
9 a.m. 

Spence was schedule4 tto 
address the student body on two 
previous occasions in the fall 
semester but both of these en- 
gagements had to be postponed 
because of prolonged illness. 

Unlike the majority of the cir- 
cit university speakers, and be- 
cause of the timely presentation 
of his lectures on current world 
affairs and the Viet Nam situa- 
tion, Spence will devote the en- 
tire day to NVrthwestern and 
will be available as speaker for 
many different campus organi- 
zations. 

In addition to his national 
broadcasts, Spence has written 
extensively on Vietnam for the 
North Atlantic Newspaper Alli- 
ance, a news-gathering agency 
for papers around the world. 

During the past few years 
Spence has toured all of South 
Vietnam and has covered every 
type of combat — setting up am- 
bush traps with the Austrailians 
in war zone D, travelling with 
U.S. Marines in operations in Da 
Nang, Flying on B-58 bombing 
and strafing raids under Viet 
Cong fire and fighting with the 
First Cavalry as a door gunner on 
a helicopter in the Central High- 
lands. 

Spence is' a graduate of Boston 
University and now makes his 
headquarters in Boston. 

Pi Omega Names 
New Officer Slate 

Pamela Hankins has been chos- 
en president of the Alpha Nu 
Chapter of Pi Omega Pi, national 
honorary business educational 
fraternity. 

Other officers named by the 
organization were Cindy Thomas, 
vice-president; Margaret Purcell, 
secretary; Sharon Bantlett, trea- 
surer; Judy Eggleston,, chaplain, 
Virginia Procell, reporter and 
Vickie Williams, social chairman. 

Twelve new members have 
been named to the organization, 
reports S. W. Robbins, faculty 
sponsor. Joining Pi Omega are 
Royce Simmons, Margie Wilson, 
Judy Veuleman, Vickie Williams, 
Waylan Nattin, Kathryn Gray, 
Virginia Procell, Sharon Bartlett, 
Judy Eggleston, James Groves, 
Ann Gallien, and Carolyn Pey- 
ton. 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Page 7 



Air Force Conductor 
Leads Collegiate Band 



TAPES! 

Just arrived: 400 popu- 
lar tapes 4 and 8 track 
tapes. 

All current popular re- 
cords and albums. 

If we don't have the one 
you want-weil get it. 

HOLMES 

Radio & Record Shop 
701 4th Street 
Ph»ne 352-2549 



Two National Grants Awarded College 
For Use in Student-Teacher Programs 



By Wooten 

The college hosted what was 
called the most successful inter- 
collegiate band in years this past 
weekend. Some 90 musicians 
from seven colleges including 
NSC made up the band conduted 
by Lit. Col. Arnold D. Gabriel, con- 
ductor of the Air Force Band in 
Washington. 

Intercollegiate band is a learn- 
ing experience and challenge for 
all involved. Musicians who are 
the best in their respective col- 
lege bands unite into one band to 
play music they have never seen 
before in a grueling schedule of 
concentrated rehearsal. 

Beginning Friday at 3 p.m. the 
band rehearsed approximately 
12 hours before the performance. 
The Saturday night concert, in- 
tense in musical content and out- 



standing in musicianship, includ- 
ed a variety of compositions. 
Gabriel with dramatic force and 
confidence challenged the band 
Pacifico by Roger Nixon, con- 
sidered the most difficult on pro- 
gram. 

Other pieces the band played 
included three spirited marches, 
Variations on a Korean Folk 
Song by John Barnes Chance, 
and Estampie by Vaclav Nehybel, 
an interesting piece of modern 
literature for band and antipho- 
nalbrass. The band attained a 
mellow sound in Man of La Man- 
cha as t hel2 French horns car- 
ried the melody of Impossible 
Dream. 

The concert closed with Tchai- 
kovsky's 4th Symphony, ending 
superbly the best concert ever 
played by an inter-collegiate 
band at this college. 



Northwestern's Departments of 
Biological Science and Special 
Education have both been award- 
ed special grants. 

The biology department has re- 
ceived a $44,920 grant by the 
National Science Foundation, 
while the special education de- 
partment was awarded $29,900 
from the U. S. Education Office's 
Bureau of the Handicapped. 

The biological Cooperative Col- 
lege-School Science Program is 
under the direction of Dr. W. 
Grady Erwin, department head. 

Twenty-four high school biology 
teachers will be selected to par- 
ticipate in the project, scheduled 
for June 3 through Aug. 1. 

Members of the project staff 
will meet with the teachers on 
four Saturdays during 1968-69 to 
assist with the solution of prob- 
lems encountered in the class- 
room and discuss future labora- 
tory procedures. 

Dr. M. J. Cousins, NSC's direc- 
tor of special education, said that 
department's grant will be used 



for traineeships and fellowships 
in mental retardation and speech 
pathology during the 1968-69 
academic year. 

Northwestern, Louisiana's first 
state college to be approved by 
the office of Education for train- 
ing of personnel in special educa- 
tion, offers teacher certification 
in the areas of mental retarda- 
tion, physical handicaps, emo- 
tional disturbances, and speech 
pathology. 

Injured NSC Coed 
Progressing Well 

Nan Rosa, Northwestern Home 
Ec major who was critically in- 
jured in a car wreck six weeks 
ago, has made remarkable pro- 
gress in her recovery. 

Doctors anticipate that Nan 
will be able to go home to 
Florida at the end of this month. 
Nan herself is confident that 
she will be able to return to 
NSC in the fall. 



Performance 
drop-in 




NEW DODGE CORONET "SUPER BEE" 
Scat Pack performance at a new low price. 

Punching a Super Bee is like dropping a bowling ball down an elevator shaft. It starts rather 
suddenly and improves from there. Owning a Super Bee is discovering that Piper-Heidsieck 
is selling at beer prices. Let's face it. When you put a hot cammed 383 V8 in a light coupe body, 
hang all the good stuff underneath, and price it below anything as quick, something's got to 
happen. The good stuff is listed below. The kicks are waiting at your nearby Dodge Dealer's. 
Let it happen to you. 

■ POWER PLANT: Standard: 383 CID V8. Cart: 4-bbl. Compression ratio: 10:0. Horsepower: 335 at 5200 RPM. Torque: 
425 lbs.-ft. at 3400 RPM. Air cleaner: unsilenced, both standard and optional V8. Optional: Hemi 426 CID V8. Hemi- 
spherical combustion chambers. Carb: dual, 4-bbl. Compression ratio: 10.25:1. Horsepower: 425 at 5000 RPM. Torque: 
490 lbs.-ft at 4000 RPM. 

B TRANSMISSION: Standard: Foor-ipeed raff syncftromesh manual. Floor-mounted shift. 
Optional: TorqueFlite automatic three-speed. Cotomn-moonted shift. 

gj SUSPENSION: Heavy-duty springs and shocks, all four wheels. .94-inch dia. sway bar standard. 

@ BRAKES: Heavy-duty standard on afl four wheels. 11-inch drums, cast iron. Shoes: Front discs optional. Self-adjusting 
Bendix type. 

Q ADDITIONAL OPTIONS: High-performanw axle package consisting of 3.55 axle ratio with Sure Grip. High-capacity 

radiator, 7-Wade slip-driw fan with shroud. 
B INSTRUMENTATION AND APPOINTMENTS: Padded RaTfye-type dash 

standard, matte black, includes circular speedometer, oil and temperature 

gauges, electric clock. Matching tich optional. Matte Mack grille, power hood, / V/ I Jgy 

Red Line wide-tread tires, seat btfts, front shoulder bete, carpeting, foam 

seats, bumblebee striping and special omamentaGoa standard. Vinyl roof 

optional. 




Dodge mkm 




FILL OUT A NO B«JL TO: 
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Enclosed is a check or money order (made payable to Hn^iee- 
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Page 8 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 15, 1968 



Trio Comes On Strong With Protest, Comedy, 
But Accompanist Shows Off Real Folk Style 



■ 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



By Jim O'Quinn 

The first performer to walk 
on the stage Tuesday night 
in the Coliseum was a dark- 
suited, grizzly-bearded little 
man with a guitar. He start- 
ed by setting up sound equip- 
ment, but before the evening 
was over he had proven his 
mettle as an extraordinary 
musician and copped the 
heartiest applause of the 
show. 

Paul Prestipino was his name, 
a«d John Denver introduced him 
as the "ethnic conscience" of the 
Mitchell Trio. 

Prestipino previewed his show- 
stopping style in short but splen- 
did banjo rides between verses 



of the songs in the first half of 
the concert. But it was not un- 
til he cut loose in solo, mag- 
nificiently manipulating the five 
strings of his instrument in varia- 
tions on folk themes and rag- 
time, that the audience recogniz- 
ed where those good string sounds 
had been coming from. 
PROTEST MATERIAL 

The best part of the singing 
segments of the show was the 
protest material, which the 
Mitchell Trio, duded up in white 
double-breasted suit and psy- 
chedelic ties, performed with 
nerve and verve. 

The college audience respond- 
ed gamely to numbers such as 
"We Think It's Great That You're 
Governor, Lurleen!" (which ex- 



Minutes of SGA 



Monday/ February 12, 1968 

President Dennis Newbury called the 
meeting to order. He led. the group 
in prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance. 

President Newbury asked that the 
regular procedure be dispensed with 
in order to get to the election of the 
Vice-President. President Newbury re- 
quested that the room be cleared of 
all non-voting mmbers for the purpose 
of reducing the possibility of any out- 
side influence. 

President Newbury nominated David 
Faraldo for the office of Vice-President. 
Seconded by Maxwell. Following the 
nomination, the members discussed 
their views and convictions on the 
question. Rispoli called for question. 
The vote was by secret ballot. The 
results of the voting was 13 against, 
and 6 for the motion. Motion failed. 

After a brief interpretation of Parlia- 
mentary Procedure, Maxwell moved to 
rescend the vote made at the meet- 
ing of February 5, 1968, concerning 
Jamie Fair as the nomination for the 
Vice-Presidency. Seconded by Town- 
send. Question called by Ferrera. Vote 
was unanimous. Motion carried. This 
made it possible to reconsider Fair 
for the position. 

President Newbury nominated Jamie 
Fair for the office of Vice-President. 
Seconded by Burns. A discussion fol- 
lowed concerning this nomination. War- 
ren moved that Jamie Fair be accepted 
for Vice-President of the SGA. Willis 
seconded. Question called by Ferrera. 
The group voted by secret ballot. The 
outcome of the vote was 17 yes and 
2 no. Motion passed. 

Resignation of John Ramsey was pre- 
sented to the SGA because of a math 
class from 6:00-9:00 p.m. on Monday 
night which is a requirement for 
graduation. President Newbury asked 
Ferrera, President of the Senior Class, 
to bring an appointment to next week's 
meeting for this position. 

President Newbury announced the 
resignation of Gaylon Landry due to 
personal reasons and President New- 
bury asked that Charles Skinner bring 
a nomination for the position to the 
next meeting. 

Minutes were read and corrected to 
read the Student Service Comm. will 
look into book store hours and prices. 
Roll called. Absent were Vestal and 
Fowler. 

Precht President of the Freshman 
class, reported that the Freshman Board 
suggests that the girls wear bows and 
the boys wear beanies this coming 
fall and that they be sold, close to 
where registration fees are paid. The 
board felt that this would boost school 
spirit. Also, it was suggested that the 
I.D. picture be made so that the fresh- 
men would have to wear them to 
athletic event for a certain period 
of time in order to get in. More em- 
phasis on cheerleader tryouts by the 
use of signs and. announcements would 



Discounts— 

(Continued from Page 1) 

DeBlieux and McCain, 10% on 
all items except fair share goods 
(big name brands such as Rem- 
ington, etc.) 

Uhrbach's Studio, 10% on all 
photos and frames 

Colonial Flower Shop, 10% on 
all purchases 

Flower Nook, 10% on all pur- 
chases 

Waddle Inn and Wee Waddle 
Inn, 3% on all items 

Brasher Texaco, 10% on tires, 
batteries, and other accessories; 

5% on oil, 3% on gas 

One Hour Martinizing and 
Holiday Cleaners, 5% on dry 
cleaning only 

Gunjter's Shoe Service, 10% 
on all merchandise 

Town House Texaco, 2% dis- 
count on each gallon of gaso- 
line 

Broadmoor Restaurant, 10% on 
all Ala Carte orders 

The cards will remain on sale 
the entire semester at the Lost 
and Found Booth in the Union. 



tolled "bigotry, with a woman's 
touch") and "Your Friendly 
Neighborhood Ku Klux Klan." 
College sex was cleverly lampoon- 
ed in "My God, I Appreciate Your 
Bod," and the running commen- 
tary on race became explicit in 
songs like Joe Frazier's soapy- 
sentimental but effective "See 
The Little Brown Girl." 

Other music ranged from the 
heavily-accented Welsh marching 
song "The Bells of Rhymmey," 
orchestrated by miracles on 
Frazier's 12-string guitar, to a 
slow, blue-moody arrangement of 
John Lennon's "She Loves You." 
IMPLICIT IDEALISM 
The peak of the performance 
came with Frazier's solo perfor- 
mance of "How It feels to Be 
Free," a spine-tingling explica- 
tion in the folk idiom of that 



idealism behind the disillusion- 
ment and unrest of today's col- 
lege generation. 

However, it takes more than 
energy, good material, and pro- 
digious individual talent to put 
across genuine folk professional- 
ism. And that is what lacked at 
Tuesday's concert. The Mitchell 
Trio, now at a stage of re-organi- 
zation (nine-year member Mike 
Kobluk left the group less than 
two weeks ago), did not manage 
to convey the authenticity of 
performance which made the 
original Chad Mitchell group 
such an artistic success. 

But that professionalism and 
authenticity was not completely 
absent from the Coliseum stage 
Tuesday night — Paul Prestipino 
played his banjo. 



increase school spirit and interest. 

Precht moved that freshman beanies 
for boys, and bows for girls be sold 
at the fee area of the coliseum during 
registration and that their purchase 
be mandatory for freshmen. Also, that 
the student I.D. card for freshmen 
will be taken with the beanies on. 
Seconded by Ferrera. Question called 
by Kevill. Motion carried. 

A discussion took place as to the 
possibility of entertainment for visit- 
ing debate teams and other high school 
visitors on campus during the spring 
semester. Maxwell moved the SGA 
appropriate funds for a film for Satur- 
day night for the entertainment of the 
debate teams. Seconded by Townsend 
Question called by Burns. Motion car- 
ried. It was recommended that not only 
displays but programs be presented at 
rallies in the future to stimulate 
interest in high school students for 
NSC. 

Bryant reported for the Freshman 
Recruiting Committee. He gave an 
outline of what his committee has done 
and will do in the future. He explained 
the kind of programs presented at the 
high schools. He listed possible plans 
Ifor next year's program. Maxwell 
moved that the SGA commend the 
good work of this committee. Seconded 
by Townsend. Questions called by 
Rispoli. Motion carried. 

Burns presented the election's board 
committee report on amendments to 
be voted on March 7. Mr. Tommy 
Keys spoke on Choice '68, voting by 
students on certain referendum ques 
and presidential candidates. He stat- 
ed that this is a good opportunity 
for the SGA to create interest so that 
NSC will be well presented in the 
Choice '68 poll. 

Maxwell presented the Current Sauce 
budget and a discussion followed. SGA 
members directed questions to the 
Current Sauce editors present. MaxweU 
moved the Current Sauce Budget be 
accepted. Seconded by Ferrera. Ques- 
tion called by Rispoli. Motion carried 
by unanimous vote. 

Maxwell gave a presentation show- 
ing the use of committee reports plus 
evaluations to help these same com- 
mittees next year. 

Burns reported that the AMS Execu- 
tive Committee will be meeting during 
the week and that emphasis will be 
placed on the Litter Campaign, Insignia 
for the Student Union, and the Tutor- 
ing program. 

Committee meetings were announced. 

Maxwell suggested that a constitu- 
tional amendment be made as to who 
would take the place of an Executive 
council member. 

Ferrera asked that we consider rais- 
ing registration fees in order to con- 
tinue cheerleader scholarships during 
the spring semester too. 

Rispoli moved the meeting be "ad- 
journed. Seconded by Townsend. Ques- 
tion caUed by Maxwell. Motion carried. 
Meeting adjourned. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Ian Warren, Secretary of SGA 



Topics Are Scheduled 
For 'Encounter' Talks 



ENCOUNTERa two-part forum 
jointly presented by the area 
Episcopalians, Lutherans, and 
Presbyterians will be held Wed- 
nesday night at 7 p.m. in room 235 
of the Student Uuion throughout 
the months of February and 
March. 

The Reverends David Lange, 
Lutheran; Pete Apple, Presbyter- 
ian; and Robert Luckett, Episcop- 
alian, will conduct the program 
planned to orient and enlighten 
interested persons with all phases 
of married life. The first phase 
of ENCOUNTER will deal with 
Man and Woman and is entitled 
"Fig Leaves, Figures, and Fami- 
lies". 

Rev. Apple, Presbyterian chap- 
lain for the campus, will speak 
this week on the topic "Listen- 
ing to Love." 

The second phase of the EN- 
COUNTER program begins 
March 6, with a series of "honest 
inquiries by men with various 
perspectives." Speakers are 
scheduled from the areas of bio- 
logy, anthropology, history and 
psychology to discuss "What, 
then is Man?" 



UNION ART SHOW 

An exhibition of the sellable 
prints and originals from the Ro- 
ten Art Gallery was displayed 
in the lobby of the Student Un- 
ion this Tuesday. 

The Picasso orginal, artistic 
and financial focal point of the 
hanging, was going at $1,700. It 
was a signed, legitimate oil with 
only 50 existent copies. 

This was, by no means, the 
only culturally aesthetic element 
of the exhibition. Representa- 
tives of the Roten Gallery led the 
buyers, critics, and viewers 
through the maze of oils, water- 
colors, and etchings by the re- 
nowned and those not so dubbed, 
perhaps, soon to be. An original 
by Mark Chagall, worth $1,200, 
was hung with $150 Lenard Bas- 
kin prints and etchings by Abbles. 

The Natchitoches phase of the 
tour was completed and the 
Roten Gallery moved to the Cen- 
tenary campus to reconvene its 
viewing. 



Latest Styles for Spring now being offered by 

DOT BRUNGART 

At Billia' House of Beauty 

Located corner of Kyser & Hwy. 1 Phone 352-4536 

Next to Warren's Market 




We invite you to shop at 

GUILLET STUDIO 

to see the new things we are doing in color Photography. 



Folk Night, a program featur- 
ing local talent, will be held at 
Duty's Pizza House next Tuesday 
night. Bring your guitar and 
make your plea. 



NATCHITOCHES 
THEATRES 



DON 



Box Office Opens 
Mon-Fri — 5:45 
| Sat, Sun — 12:45 

I — Admissions — 
Adults — 1.00 
Children — 50c 

For Movie 
Information, Don 
and Chief, Dial 
352-5109 



Tonight through 
Saturday 



Jody McCrea 
Jock Mahoney 
"The Glory 
Stompers" 
Color 

Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 

Doug McClure 
Nancy Kwan 

"Nobody's Perfect" 

Color 

Starts Wednesday 

Michael Caine 
"Billion Dollar 

Brain" 

Color 



; CHI EF , 

DRIVE ! N , 



Last Time Tonight] 

Kirk Douglas 
Jean Simmons 
Tony Curtis 

"Spartacus" 
Color 

Saturday Only 

Audie Murphy 
"The Texan" 
— Co-Feature — 
George Hamilton 
"Jack Of 
Diamonds" 
Both in Color 

Sun.-Mon.-Tues. 

Lee Marvin 
Angie Dickinson 
"Point Blank" 
Color 

Wednesday 
Buck Night 

Ann Margaret 
Elvis Presley 
"Viva Las Vegas" 
— Co-Feature — 
Jane Fonda 
"Sunday In 
New York" 
Both in Color 



1 




Current S 



auce 



Vol. LVI— No. 18 



Northwestern State College, Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Thursday, February 22, 1968 



In Viet Nam 

A 
Trip 

To 

The 

PX 

By Tom Hardin 

Written by Journalism major 
Tom Hardin from Lake Charles, 
"A Trip to the PX" reflects the 
author's opinion of a incident 
occurring while he was stationed 
in Viet Nam. Hardin, a twenty 
month Viet Nam veteran, was 
stationed at Ai Van, some 15 
miles north of DaNang. 

It wasn't a bad place to be. 
You could expect a mortar at- 
tack and a suicide squad every 
two or three months, but being 
so close to air support, it was 
usually pretty quiet. 

You had about twelve hours of 
guard a day. When you were off, 
you slept, or read a book, or you 
played poker or drank beer. It 
wasn't a bad place to be. You 
talked a lot. 

And you lived for your PX 
runs. At the PX you could get 
the latest Playboy, a couple of 
new paperbacks, cigarettes, all 
kinds of stuff. 

No trucks had been allowed 
up or down the hill for the past 
month. There'd been a lot of 
action around us. All supplies 
were flown in by helicopter. You 
forgot what beer tasted like. 

C Rations. Nothing but C Ra- 
tions. Man. 

Well, today we were finally 
getting a PX run. Just one truck. 
Just eight men. I had to practical- 
ly sell my soul, but I was one of 
those eight men. The truck was 
leaving at eight. Then it was 
leaving at ten. The truck is sup- 
posed to leave at twelve. 

And it looks as though it might 
make it. Here comes the driver. 
Guess we're going after all. Yeah, 
up and rolling. 

The mist was just clearing in 
the noonday sun. Da Nang Bay 
lay shining below — blue as blue 
can be. We rolled the canvas 
top back and stood up into the 
air. It was about the most beauti- 
ful day I had ever seen. Every- 
body was so happy just to be 
there— breathing. 

Then, from a couple of miles 
down the side of the hill an ex- 
plosion sounded. Some smoke 
came up, then steady automatic 
fire for about a minute. Some 
truck had been hit. 

We reached the pass. All traf- 
fic was stopped. There were about 
fifty trucks, cars and busses pam- 
med together. The people had 
gotten down from the busses and 
left their cars. They congregated 
over by the stores and pushed 
together by the edge of the hill, 
trying to see. 

The vendors were everywhere. 
»ellmg everything. Soda pop, ice 
cream, fresh fruit, cold beer, 
washpans, various pornography, 
combs, brushes, marijuana, smok- 
m § jackets. Everything. And the 



talking 



never stopped. 



11 was three o'clock before 
any more trucks were allowed to 
go down. After the traffic clear- 
ea . we went on. 
A couple of miles later, there 
was. A truck just like ours. 
Charred. Black. 

A truck just like ours. There 
ere m en in it. Now they're just 
(See A Trip, Page 8) 




DeWitt Is Elected 
AWS President 

Eight Officers Chosen In 
All-Campus Vote Tuesday 



HALFWAY down the hill we heard an explosion. 



Edith DeWitt, sophomore 
speech therapy major from Alex- 
andria, has been elected presi- 
dent of the Northwestern State 
College's Associated Women Stu- 
dents. 

She defeated Mary Bernard, 
sophomore education major from 
Natchitoches, in a tight race for 
the presidency. Miss Bernard 
will become the new vice-presi- 
dent in accordance with election 
rules which provide that the 
second place finisher in the 
presidential race automatically 
inherits the vice-presidential 
post. 

Linda Henderson, sophomore 



Faraldo Speaks To SGA Counci 
As Fair Takes Over In VP Post 



By The Sauce Editorial Staff 

Taking office and serving 
for the first time on the SGA 
during its session Monday 
night was newly-chosen Vice- 
President Jamie Fair, who 
was selected by secret ballot 
last week by the SGA during 
an hour-long closed session 
called by President Dennis 
Newbury. 

Appearing and speaking at the 
meeting Monday night was ex- 
SGA vice-president David Faral- 
do, who was also considered by 
the SGA for the vice-presidency 
appointment which went to Fair. 
Faraldo stated that he had come 
to the meeting not to disagree 
with the group's decision, but 
to explain why he had resigned 
as State SUSGA Entertainment 
chairman last year. 

He explained that he had taken 
the job to coordinate the year's 
entertainmnet by blockbooking 
for NSC and other schools, but 



upon returning from summer 
military camp, he discovered that 
Bill Fowler, then NSC entertain- 
ment chairman, had already lined 
up the College's entertainment. 

REQUEST DENIED 

Faraldo said he then resigned 
the state post so that Fowler, 
who was in a better position to 
handle the state entertainment, 
could head the state committee. 

Faraldo stated that hie had 
asked President Newbury before 
last Monday night's meeting if 
he could attend the session and 
explain the situation to the SGA, 
but Newbury, according to 
Faraldo, stated that he was 
holding a closed session. Faraldo 
said that he then requested New- 
bury to allow him to come and 
speak with the SGA prior to the 
meeting but Newbury, stated the 
ex-vice-president, denied the re- 
quest. 

This explained Faraldo, was 



Cast Crew Of Dark' 
In Final Rehearsals 



What happens in the dark at 
the top of the stairs? 

Ten-year-old Cal Schexnider, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Schex- 
nider of Natchitoches, plays Son- 
ny Flood, an outspoken youngster 
in the William Inge comedy- 
drama scheduled March 5, 7, and 
8 in the Little Theafe. "The dark 
is in front of you," Sonny tells 
his mother one night, afraid to 
climb the stairs to bed. "you 
don't know what's waiting for 
you there." 

Sonny's problem becomes rep- 
resentative of the enigmatic situ- 
ations of other character in 
"The Dark at the Top of the 
Stairs," and, in the course of 
the play, light comes to dispel 
some of the darkness in each of 
their lives. 

Pettaway Directs 

Speech instructor Marc Petta- 
way is director of the College 
Theatre production. 

Junior speech major Nancy 
Martin and senior speech major 
John Braden lead the cast as 
Cora and Rubin Flood, Sonny's 
parents. Miss Martin's College 



Theafe credits include the lead- 
ing role of Katrin in the 1967 
production of "I Remember 
Mama," and the part of the 
mother in "Barefoot in the 
Park", during Summer Theatre. 
Braden last appeared as the War- 
rior in "Amphitryon 38." 
Intesive Rehearsals 

Junio r speech and journalism 
major Susie Chancey will play 
a leading role in "Dark" as Son- 
nie's Aunt Lottie. Speech major 
Leah Rivers of Natchitoches is 
cast as Reenie, the sister, and 
junior Byron Nail of Metairie 
will be her Jewish suitor, Sam- 
my Goldenbaum. Robert Cox 
Sheri Saloff and Russell Luker 
will appear in supporting roles. 

F^ank Magers of the Speech 
and Journalism Department is 
technical director for the pro- 
duction. Pettaway's assistant is 
Bruce Kalman. 

Intensive rehearsals for the 
show are now in progress on a 
partially-completed set in the 
Little Theatre. Curtain time for 
the show will be 8 p.m. each 
evening. Students will be admit- 
ted by showing their I.D. cards. 



his only gripe. Upon completing 
his speech, Faraldo received ap- 
plause from the SGA members 
and others present. 

SGA APPOINTMENTS 

Two new SGA voting members 
were appointed to fill class of- 
ficer vacancies Monday night. 
Wayne Horn was appointed and 
SGA as the new Senior Class 
president. Horn, recommended 
by Senior President Duan Fer- 
rera, replaces John Ramsey who 
resigned his post last week. 

A vacancy in the office of Jun- 
ior Vice President was also filled 
by the unanimous approval and 
appointment of Terry Alario to 
replace Gaylon Landry who also 
submitted his resignation last 
week. Alario, endorsed by Junior 
President Charles Skinner, vied 
last spring for the junior vice- 
presidency against Landry. 
PUBLICATIONS BOARD 

The formation of a more ef- 
fective publication board with 
editors of both publications as 
permanent members was the sug- 
gestion proposed Monday by 
Current Sauce Editor Diane 
Nickerson as she reported on the 
■publication, workshop attended 
her and two other college publi- 
cation members last week in Sa- 
vannah. 

Miss Nickerson recommended 
that the board meet more often 
and also set down guide lines 
for the operation, control and 
censorship of the Sauce. These 
guidelines, stated Miss Nicker- 
son, would help eliminate contra- 
versies over editorial policy and 
censorship which tend to change 
each week. 



social studies major from Winn- 
field, was elected as the inter- 
collegiate AWS representative. 

Janis Lowe won the recording 
secretary spot. She is a junior 
business education major from 
Haynesville. 

Runoffs will be held Monday 
for the other four AWS positions. 
Two coeds will be on the ballot 
for each office and according to 
Dean of Women Lucille Hend- 
ricks, the polls would be open 
from 8 a.m. until approximately 
7 p.m. 

Chris Reed, freshman home 
economics education major from 
Alexandria, and Linda Hollings- 
worth, junior social science ed- 
ucation major from Alexandria 
will vie for the corresponding 
secretary position. 

Seeking the office of social 
chairman will be Kitty Posey, 
Junior primary education major 
from Mansfield, and Marjorie 
Padula, sophomore social studies 
major from Bossier City. 

On the ballot for publicity 
chairman will be Cheryl Shaub, 
junior upper elementary educa- 
tion major from Haughton and 
Marsha Bella, freshman govern- 
ment major from Berwick. 

New officers were elected in 
campus-wide balloting with all 
women living on campus eligible 
to vote. 




Edith D 



Union Movie 

Academy Award winner Lee 
Marvin and Hollywood star Jane 
Fonda lead the cast of the award- 
winning movie "Cat Ballou," 
which will be shown today and 
tomorrow in the Student Union. 
Features are scheduled for 3 and 
7 p.m. both days. Admission will 
be 50 cents per student. 




DAD 




POSTERS AND THINGS — The Union has been the scene of conven- 
tions, tournaments, political contests, and all sorts of student gather- 
ings already in 1968, and the Union Committees, under the direction 
of Union supervisor Lynn Hargrave, have announced activities for 
the spring semester. See story on page 4. 



Page 2 



THE CURRENT SAUCE 



Thursday, February 22, 196a 



A Random Survey 



Grading? Prejudice? SGA? 



LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS 



There has always been the 
sincere effort by the staff of this 
newspaper to better the content 
and create a mode toward en- 
lightened thought on topics of 
public concern and interest. 

We have proposed several 
questions to individuals within 
the student body who were ran- 
domly encountered during the 
afternoon of Monday, Feb. 19. 
This editorial is a statement 
based upon the answers we re- 
ceived from those interviews. 
We sight them as representative 
of the individual only and appeal 
to the student body, the vocal 
majority and determining ele- 
ment of the essense of this cam- 
pus' existense, to stimulate per- 
sonal interest in these subjects. 
We hope the questions asked 
touch on at least one topic which 
interests, perturbs, or disturbs 
you. If so, we invite your opin- 
ions in a "Letter to the Editor" 
of the "Current Sauce," to be 
published with the intent sighted 
previously. 

The question was asked: "Do 
you find the present system of 
education at Northwestern to be 
adequate?" The majority an- 
swered "no." Though some said 
that their particular curricula, 
Business and P r e - L a w had 
created no cause for disapproval, 
others found their major was too 
dominated by "non-oriented gar- 
bage." Some said that the grad- 
ing system was jpfoor. Several 
students said that they believed 
the grading system in the Eng- 



lish Department was too high 
and relating to English, said 
that the synthezation of a lengthy 
theme for those classes in an 
hour's time was extremely mis- 
leading as evidence of a stu- 
dent's capability. Others saw a 
need for more "New Blood" a- 
mong the faculty and adminis- 
tration and sighted noticable 
changes they could observe with- 
in the system where non-NSC- 
oriented teachers were present. 

A strong majority seemed dis- 
enchanted by what was termed 
the "rediculous absurdity" of the 
present attendance regulations. 

Some students said they saw 
evidence of a lack of departmen- 
tal cooperation. Certain members 
of departments were accused of 
penalizing, without reason, stu- 
dents while showing favoritism 
with others. 

When asked if they were aware 
of any prejudice on